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  • 1
    Language: English
    In: Communication Quarterly, 01 April 2013, Vol.61(2), pp.217-235
    Description: This study explores how talent-based reality shows with different thematic content influence gratifications obtained (GO) by viewers. Participants completed surveys regarding their reasons for watching reality programs, in general, and their reasons for watching specific talent-based reality shows (American Idol, Dancing With the Stars, and America's Got Talent). Results identified 2 gratifications not previously observed in other gratifications research (TV personalities and schadenfreude), and that correlations exist between the content of talent-based programs and GO.
    Subject(s): Popular Culture ; Television ; Journalism & Communications ; Languages & Literatures
    ISSN: 0146-3373
    E-ISSN: 1746-4102
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  • 2
    Article
    Article
    2013
    ISSN: 0891-2432 
    Language: English
    In: Gender & Society, February 2013, Vol.27(1), pp.82-105
    Description: Uptalk is the use of a rising, questioning intonation when making a statement, which has become quite prevalent in contemporary American speech. Women tend to use uptalk more frequently than men do, though the reasons behind this difference are contested. I use the popular game show Jeopardy! to study variation in the use of uptalk among the contestants’ responses, and argue that uptalk is a key way in which gender is constructed through interaction. While overall, Jeopardy! contestants use uptalk 37 percent of the time, there is much variation in the use of uptalk. The typical purveyor of uptalk is white, young, and female. Men use uptalk more when surrounded by women contestants, and when correcting a woman contestant after she makes an incorrect response. Success on the show produces different results for men and women. The more successful a man is, the less likely he is to use uptalk; the more successful a woman is, the more likely she is to use uptalk.
    Subject(s): Gender ; Speech ; Popular Culture ; Sociology & Social History ; Women'S Studies
    ISSN: 0891-2432
    E-ISSN: 1552-3977
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  • 3
    Article
    Article
    2015
    ISSN: 0021-8294 
    In: Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion, September 2015, Vol.54(3), pp.596-615
    Description: We investigate the location patterns of organizations that embody key religious‐spiritual traditions and that have grown to prominence in the latter 20th and early 21st centuries: evangelical churches, yoga, and martial arts. The distribution of key cultural organizations depends on the degree to which they are able to frame themselves in relation to one another and to core American traditions. Organizations associated with the American religious divide are more polarized in their social appeal and spatial distributions, and those framed as broadly neutral elements of popular culture are more widely distributed. Using a national database of local amenities, we find that theologically conservative churches are popular in many neighborhoods but concentrated in less‐educated and nonwhite areas. Yoga studios are less geographically dispersed and more spatially concentrated in college‐educated and white areas. Compared to these, martial arts schools, sports clubs, and other pop‐culture amenities are more widely distributed across different types of areas.
    Subject(s): Religion ; Yoga ; Martial Arts ; Cultural Divide ; Popular Culture
    ISSN: 0021-8294
    E-ISSN: 1468-5906
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  • 4
    Article
    Article
    2014
    ISSN: 0022-3840 
    Language: English
    In: Journal of popular culture, Jan 2014, Vol.47(6), pp.1296-1313
    Description: Dungeons & Dragons (D&D) is often described as a childhood game of "Cops & Robbers," but with rules to settle the inevitable "I shot you first!" This article considers the implications of adding rationalized rules to imaginative play for understanding the relationship between disenchantment and (re)enchantment in the modern world, as demonstrated in the history of Dungeons & Dragons.
    Subject(s): Games of Strategy ; Popular Culture ; Modernity ; Protestant Ethic ; Sociology
    ISSN: 0022-3840
    E-ISSN: 15405931
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  • 5
    Article
    Article
    2013
    ISSN: 00223840 
    Language: English
    In: Journal of Popular Culture, Aug 2013, Vol.46(4), pp.868-885
    Description: The number of paparazzi has grown dramatically, and confrontations between paparazzi and celebrities also have increased. As the paparazzi ranks have swelled, many young newcomers to the business have flouted "old-school" techniques such as not being seen while following and photographing celebrities.
    Subject(s): Celebrities ; Photographers ; Popular Culture
    ISSN: 00223840
    E-ISSN: 15405931
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  • 6
    Language: English
    In: Journal of popular culture, Jan 2014, Vol.47(6), pp.1122-1138
    Description: It is the thesis of this essay that a specific chronotope has recently come to dominate many contemporary cinematic texts and that this chronotope demands to be named so as to mark its emergence as distinctive and so as to understand its function and semiotic weight. While Bakhtin describes the chronotope as a fulcrum of time/space and declares the human form to be intrinsically chronotopic, it is our thesis that representations of the body are increasingly central to contemporary narrative. The importance of this chronotope virtually demands its naming. We take "soma," to signify "the body of an organism," and, "tope," to signify "place." Hence, the body place4 names the somatope.
    Subject(s): Popular Culture ; Technology ; Gender ; Literary Theory ; Time ; Films ; Cinema ; Visual Culture ; Bakhtin, Mikhail ; Haraway, Donna ; Cameron, James ; Sociology ; Anthropology
    ISSN: 0022-3840
    E-ISSN: 15405931
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  • 7
    Article
    Article
    2013
    ISSN: 00223840 
    Language: English
    In: Journal of Popular Culture, Dec 2013, Vol.46(6), pp.1330-1347
    Description: In 2004, Loren Glass observed that the academic study of celebrity could be considered a "growth industry" (3). Though Richard Dyer's 1979 book Stars is widely considered to have ushered in a more systematic, analytical study of celebrity, it took at least a decade for the growth that Glass discerned to take root. But with the appearance of valuable studies like Joshua Gamson's Claims to Fame (1994), P. David Marshall's Celebrity and Power (1997), Chris Rojek's Celebrity (2001), and Graeme Turner's Understanding Celebrity (2004), the industry was indeed booming, as multiple, competing paradigms for understanding public visibility began to take shape. Many of those paradigms marked a shift away from a theory of celebrity as a purely top-down hegemonic production; nudged in this direction by Dyer's work, which decried the lack of attention to audiences' active engagement with celebrity texts; theorists lined up to disavow the manipulation thesis: the notion that, in Dyer's words, "both stardom...
    Subject(s): Popular Culture ; Celebrities ; Business
    ISSN: 00223840
    E-ISSN: 15405931
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  • 8
    In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, February 2018, Vol.74(2), pp.310-317
    Description: To purchase or authenticate to the full-text of this article, please visit this link: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/jan.13452/abstract Byline: Margaret McAllister, Donna Lee Brien, Lorna Piatti-Farnell Keywords: ethics; love; nurses; nursing image; popular culture; professional issues Abstract Aims To discuss representations of nursing in popular culture using the Contemporary Gothic theory. Background Nursing is stereotypically known as a caring profession. Caring in both the natural and professional perspectives is inextricably attached to love and love, we are told, is universal. In popular culture, however, there are numerous examples of nurses being portrayed in ways where love-its expression and its practice-has been transgressed or tainted. Exploring this dark side of nursing, even if fictitious, is significant because it illuminates social and cultural tensions. Design Discussion paper. Data sources CINAHL, Scopus and Humanities International Databases were searched for terms related to nursing, love, abject and the gothic, published between 1990-2016. Four popular culture texts which ranged in genre and gothic elements were selected for analysis. Implications for nursing The types of transgressive love these nurses express to patients ranges from the obsessive and the pornographic, to the monstrous. We suggest this positioning illuminates a hidden reality that nursing work is at once intimate and personal but also hidden, profane, repellent, horrifying and feared. Nursing's allure for storytellers may rest in its association with the abject. How nurses find redemption, satisfaction and meaning in these locations is relevant for how we can imbue our lives and work with greater humanity. Conclusion The Contemporary Gothic is a useful tool in exposing and exploring ambiguous, challenging and taboo aspects of nursing in society. Such and analysis helps to explain phenomena-including nursing itself-which exists in the shadow of dominant and often stereotyped discourses. Article Note: Funding information This research received no specific grant from any funding agency in the public, commercial or not-for-profit sectors.
    Subject(s): Ethics ; Love ; Nurses ; Nursing Image ; Popular Culture ; Professional Issues
    ISSN: 0309-2402
    E-ISSN: 1365-2648
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  • 9
    Language: English
    In: Sex Roles, Jan 2016, Vol.74(1-2), pp.78-91
    Description: We conducted a content analysis of children's products in U.S. popular culture that depict male and female characters to determine the extent to which gender stereotypes were portrayed. We examined popular Halloween costumes (90 female costumes and 90 male costumes) from popular retail websites, 79 popular dolls and 71 popular action figures from national store websites, and Valentines found at two national stores (portraying 54 female and 59 male characters). The coding system was adapted from several different studies. Female characters were far more likely than male characters to be depicted with traditional feminine stereotyped cues (e.g., decorative clothing) and sexually submissive, hyper-feminine cues (e.g., revealing clothing). Male characters were far more likely to be portrayed with traditional masculine characteristics like functional clothing and the body-in-motion, and they were often depicted with hyper-masculine accessories such as having a weapon. Implications for children's...
    Subject(s): United States–Us ; Sex Roles ; Children ; Sex ; Patriarchy ; Stereotypes ; Child Development ; Popular Culture ; Sex Stereotypes ; Content Analysis ; Gender Differences ; Stereotypes ; Children & Youth ; Popular Culture ; Feminist/Gender Studies; Sociology of Gender & Gender Relations ; American Psychological Association
    ISSN: 03600025
    E-ISSN: 15732762
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  • 10
    Article
    Article
    2014
    ISSN: 00987484 
    Language: English
    In: JAMA, Jul 9, 2014, Vol.312(2), p.125
    Description: Controversies about the proper content of school-based sex education continue, but in some fundamental sense they have been matched by other pressing realities. For example, there are increasing demands that school resources be dedicated to teaching the basics of reading, writing, and math and to upgrading the attention given to science education. Many communities find that meeting these legitimate demands places substantial pressure on school hours and budgets, often at the expense of such areas as art and physical education as well as health education, which often includes sex education. Moreover, limited budgets can also decrease the amount of training made available to sex education teachers. Here, Strasburger and Brown comment on the sex education in the 21st century.
    Subject(s): Popular Culture ; Sex Education ; Conflict ; School Schedules ; Teaching Methods
    ISSN: 00987484
    E-ISSN: 15383598
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