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  • 1
    Book
    Book
    2020
    ISBN: 0231185081  ISBN: 9780231185080 
    Language: English
    Description: Perpetrator Cinema explores a new trend in the cinematic depiction of genocide that has emerged in Cambodian documentary in the late twentieth- and early twenty-first centuries. While past films documenting the Holocaust and genocides in Yugoslavia, Rwanda, and elsewhere have focused on collecting and foregrounding the testimony of survivors and victims, the intimate horror of the autogenocide enables post-Khmer Rouge Cambodian documentarians to propose a direct confrontation between the first-generation survivor and the perpetrator of genocide. These films break with Western tradition and disrupt the political view that reconciliation is the only legitimate response to atrocities of the past. Rather, transcending the perpetrator's typical denial or partial confession, this extraordinary form of "duel" documentary creates confrontational tension and opens up the possibility of a transformation in power relations, allowing viewers to access feelings of moral resentment. Raya Morag examines works by Rithy Panh, Rob Lemkin and Thet Sambath, and Lida Chan and Guillaume Suon, among others, to uncover the ways in which filmmakers endeavor to allow the survivors' moral status and courage to guide viewers to a new, more complete understanding of the processes of coming to terms with the past. These documentaries show how moral resentment becomes a way to experience, symbolize, judge, and finally incorporate evil into a system of ethics. Morag's analysis reveals how perpetrator cinema provides new epistemic tools and propels the recent social-cultural-psychological shift from the era of the witness to the era of the perpetrator.
    Subject(s): 1975–1979 ; In motion pictures ; Cambodia ; Peace & Conflict Studies ; Psychology ; Genocide in motion pictures ; History ; Documentary films ; Genocide ; Political atrocities ; Film Studies ; History and criticism ; Mass murderers ; Politics and government
    ISBN: 0231185081
    ISBN: 9780231185080
    Source: De Gruyter eBooks
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  • 2
    Language: English
    In: Journal of Perpetrator Research, 2018-12-16, Vol.2 (1), p.13-19
    Description: Post-World War II Holocaust studies, followed by genocide, trauma, and postcolonial studies, set the triangulation of perpetrator, victim, and bystander at the heart of their discussion of both the ethical legacy of the Holocaust and the aftermath of other twentieth-century catastrophes. Aiming at the constitution of an appropriate instrument to deal with transitional justice issues, during the 1990s the South African Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) interwove these subject positions, thereby attesting to a major transformation in post-genocide reconciliation processes, though not altering their basic foundation. Other theorizations, especially of the perpetrator, for example, expanded the scale of sociological characterization of the triangulation or confronted its call for interpellation and identification (most prominently in the fields of criminology and literature, respectively), but further reflected the same triadic foundation. The exploratory opposition between subject position and action provoked by Gudehus in his ‘Some Remarks on the Label, Field, and Heuristics of Perpetrator Research’ (in this issue) follows the twentieth century’s legacy as well. Undoubtedly, opposing epistemology (subject position) and ontology (the action-able), as his essay suggests, contributes to our renewed efforts to comprehend perpetratorhood, recently kindled by the initiation of the Journal of Perpetrator Research and its pioneering editorial. However, I suggest that while adhering to the twentieth-century legacies – from Hilberg’s triad to Primo Levi’s ‘Gray Zone’ – it is necessary to comprehend perpetratorhood in light of the shift from the victim era, defined as such by the seminal works of Felman and Laub and particularly Wieviorka, to the perpetrator era.
    ISSN: 2514-7897
    E-ISSN: 2514-7897
    Source: Directory of Open Access Journals
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  • 3
    Article
    Article
    2012
    ISSN: 0270-5346  ISSN: 1529-1510 
    Language: English
    In: Camera obscura (Durham, NC), 2012, Vol.27 (2), p.93-133
    Description: This essay proposes a new paradigm for cinema trauma studies: the trauma of the perpetrator. Recognizing a current shift in interest from trauma suffered by victims to that suffered by perpetrators, it seeks to break the repression of the abhorrent figure of the perpetrator in cinema and psychoanalysis literature. This new paradigm is driven by the emergence of a new wave of Israeli documentaries such as Ari Folman's , Tamar Yarom's , and Avi Mograbi's , one that for the first time includes female IDF (Israeli Defense Forces) veterans. Israeli cinema, attached on one side to the legacy of the Holocaust and on the other to the Israeli occupation, proves a highly relevant case for probing the limits of both types of traumas. Taking as a point of departure the distinction between testimony given by the victim and confession made by the perpetrator, the paper addresses the questions of whether the trauma of the perpetrator indeed exists; how we might understand the somatic and epistemological conditions of guilt; how we should define the perpetrator's trauma in contrast to the victim's; and whether this cinematic trend indeed paves the way for Israelis to assume responsibility for their deeds. Analyzing the characteristics of perpetrator trauma defined as crises (of evidence, disclosure, gender, audience, narrativization) finally leads to a preliminary reflection on the possible relevance of this model for analyzing related new-war films in twenty-first-century world cinema.
    Subject(s): Theory and Philosophy ; Media Studies ; Gender and Sexuality ; Feminist Theory ; trauma ; guilt ; Folman, Ari ; gender ; film genres ; To See If I'm Smiling ; Israeli-Palestinian conflict ; film ; Waltz with Bashir ; ethics ; documentary film ; Lir'ot 'im 'ani me?ayekhet ; Yarom, Tamar ; dramatic arts ; soldier ; Z32 ; Israel ; Israelis ; Mograbi, Avi ; Vals 'im Bashir
    ISSN: 0270-5346
    ISSN: 1529-1510
    E-ISSN: 1529-1510
    Source: Duke University Press
    Source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
    Source: © ProQuest LLC All rights reserved〈img src="https://exlibris-pub.s3.amazonaws.com/PQ_Logo.jpg" style="vertical-align:middle;margin-left:7px"〉
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  • 4
    Article
    Article
    2008
    ISSN: 0742-4671  ISSN: 1934-6018 
    Language: English
    In: Journal of film and video, 2008-10-01, Vol.60 (3/4), p.3-24
    Subject(s): Terrorism ; Memory ; War ; Movies ; Suicide ; Identity ; Suicide bombers ; Boards of trustees ; Documentary films ; Paradise ; Terrorism in motion pictures ; Israel ; Motion pictures and the uprising ; Intifada, 1987-1993 ; trauma ; Paradise Now ; dramatic arts ; terrorism ; Israeli-Palestinian conflict ; film ; Al-Jannah al-an ; Ha-Harug ha-17 ; Ofek, David ; Abu As'ad, Hani ; Evaluation ; War films ; Motion pictures, Israeli ; Analysis ; War in motion pictures
    ISSN: 0742-4671
    ISSN: 1934-6018
    E-ISSN: 1934-6018
    Source: Communication & Mass Media Complete
    Source: JSTOR Arts & Sciences V
    Source: Project MUSE - Premium Collection
    Source: © ProQuest LLC All rights reserved〈img src="https://exlibris-pub.s3.amazonaws.com/PQ_Logo.jpg" style="vertical-align:middle;margin-left:7px"〉
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  • 5
    Article
    Article
    2020
    ISSN: 0270-5346 
    Language: English
    In: Camera obscura (Durham, NC), 2020-05-01, Vol.35 (1), p.77-107
    Description: The remarkable gendered renaissance of post–Khmer Rouge (KR) New Cambodian Cinema is evidenced in recent years through first- and second- generation post-traumatic films. This article analyzes one prominent example—Lida Chan and Guillaume P. Suon’s Noces Rouges (Red Wedding, Cambodia/France, 2012)—showing how the Cambodian genocide is for the first time dealt with as a gendered genocide, breaking the taboo issues of forced marriage (a unique form of genocide in the world) and rape. A detailed analysis of Red Wedding describes how the meaning of forced marriage and rape is framed by both the cinema and the relevant national and international discourses embodied by the KR tribunal (also known as the ECCC) and the controversies its proceedings caused. The article compares the cinematic testimony per se and that testimony transferred into legal testimony in court to reflect on the role of cinema in promoting women’s history. Furthermore, it raises highly controversial subjects, such as how to analyze the layers of gendered silencing surrounding both women’s traumatic history and women perpetrators of these sexual crimes; the influence of former KR cadres within current Cambodian society; and the necropolitical function of the killing fields as “truth spaces.” Female testimony, putting forth necrophagic ethics, ultimately becomes the foundation of traumatic history. The conclusion suggests that these intense, embodied first-generation memories resist remembering and instead continue to haunt the individual and the collective; it thus proposes some reflections on the unique role of gendered cinema in healing post- traumatic society in a postgenocide era.
    ISSN: 0270-5346
    E-ISSN: 1529-1510
    Source: Duke University Press
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  • 6
    Article
    Article
    2019
    ISSN: 1911-0359 
    Language: English
    In: Genocide studies and prevention, 2019-12, Vol.13 (3), p.176-177
    ISSN: 1911-0359
    E-ISSN: 1911-9933
    Source: Directory of Open Access Journals
    Source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
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  • 7
    Article
    Article
    2008
    ISSN: 0306-7661  ISSN: 1559-7989 
    Language: English
    In: Framework, 2008-04-01, Vol.49 (1), p.121-133
    Subject(s): Fear ; Terrorism ; Passengers ; Memory ; Buses ; Cameras ; Sound ; Movies ; DOSSIER ON MORPHING REALITIES: The Current Status of the Real in Film and Television ; Ring tones ; Musical rhythm ; Motion pictures ; Israel ; Psychic trauma in motion pictures ; short film ; trauma ; memory ; dramatic arts ; terrorism ; film genres ; sound ; Israeli-Palestinian conflict ; 2002-2004 ; film ; Social aspects ; Psychic trauma ; Portrayals
    ISSN: 0306-7661
    ISSN: 1559-7989
    E-ISSN: 1559-7989
    Source: Project MUSE - Premium Collection
    Source: © ProQuest LLC All rights reserved〈img src="https://exlibris-pub.s3.amazonaws.com/PQ_Logo.jpg" style="vertical-align:middle;margin-left:7px"〉
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  • 8
    Article
    Article
    2006
    ISSN: 1529-1510  ISSN: 0270-5346 
    Language: English
    In: Camera obscura (Durham, NC), 2006, Vol.21 (61), p.146
    Subject(s): Girl, Interrupted ; dramatic arts ; Hungerjahre ; Leigh, Mike ; Mangold, James ; bulimia ; film ; Life Is Sweet ; Brückner, Jutta ; Bulimia ; Health aspects ; Mentally ill ; Portrayals
    ISSN: 1529-1510
    ISSN: 0270-5346
    E-ISSN: 1529-1510
    Source: Duke University Press
    Source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
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  • 9
    Article
    Article
    2012
    ISSN: 0270-5346 
    Language: English
    In: Camera obscura (Durham, NC), 2012-09-01 (80), p.93
    Subject(s): Folman, Ari ; Motion pictures, Israeli ; Filmmakers ; Criticism and interpretation ; Analysis ; Forecasts and trends ; Works
    ISSN: 0270-5346
    E-ISSN: 1529-1510
    Source: Duke University Press
    Source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
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  • 10
    Lexicon Article
    Lexicon Article
    2016
    ISBN: 0199840733  ISBN: 9780199840731 
    Language: English
    In: Jewish Studies, 2016-05-26
    Description: The canon of Israeli/Jewish/Hebrew cinema studies proposes a unitary conception in regard to the major periods, genres, and trends that have characterized this corpus since its inception (1910 for nonfiction and 1932 for fiction films). The ongoing endeavor of both Israeli fiction and nonfiction cinemas is to constitute national identity cinematically and document Israel as a community of memory and as a national/regional cinema of conflict. The Israeli corpus is defined in research according to how it addresses issues of identity (trans)formation and negotiation of the I- (ethnic) other in a condition of incessant conflictual (and traumatic) relations: Zionist Realism films (1930s–1960s) were dedicated to the establishment of three myths—Aliya (immigration to Israel), Mizoug Galuyot (integration), and the Sabra (New Jew)—all of which oppose the Jewish Diaspora and embrace Zionism. The heroic-nationalist genre (1930s–1950s) represents the Sabra as an ideal warrior figure. During the mid-1960s, two new types of films emerged—modernist and popular. The former (also known as personal cinema, the Israeli New Wave, or the New Sensibility) was low budget and focused on urban Tel Aviv. Using experimental techniques, it staged an aesthetic opposition to the scarifying ideal elevated by the heroic-nationalist ethos. Criticism of Zionism and the Sabra and a desire to disconnect filmmaking from hegemonic politics stand at its core. At the same time, popular cinema formulated as ethnic comedy (the Bourekas genre) depicted the inter-ethnic conflict between Ashkenazi Jews (of European origin) and Mizrahi/Sephardi Jews (of Middle Eastern or North African origin) ambiguously solved through mixed marriage, ostensibly reaffirming the integration myth. Dealing, albeit through escapism, with the repression of the Mizrahi/Sephardi Jew, the Bourekas films subverted the Zionist-national heroic films. The golden years of the genre ended with the 1977 rise to power of the right-wing Likud, a Mizrahi/Sephardi-oriented party. Cinema made during the 1970s, after the Yom Kippur War (1973), including the beginnings of women’s cinema, further subverted previous masculine and feminine hegemonic concepts. Critical cinema of the 1980s paved the way to representation of the Palestinian as a positive protagonist (the Palestinian Wave), simultaneous with the total breaking of all previous Israeli masculine myths. Thus, it is not by chance that the major scholarly works on Israeli cinema began to appear during these years. The First Intifada (Palestinian uprising) (1987), and especially the Second Intifada (2002), marked both a continuing debate over the issues of victimhood and perpetration and the enthusiastic international and local reception of the New Israeli cinema.
    Subject(s): Judaism and Jewish Studies
    ISBN: 0199840733
    ISBN: 9780199840731
    Source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
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