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  • 1
    Language: English
    In: Educational evaluation and policy analysis, 2002-12-01, Vol.24 (4), p.305-331
    Description: We developed a zero-to-five index of the strength of accountability in 50 states based on the use of high-stakes testing to sanction and reward schools, and analyzed whether that index is related to student gains on the NAEP mathematics test in 1996-2000. The study also relates the index to changes in student retention in the 9th grade and to changes in high school completion rates over the same period. The results show that students in high-accountability states averaged significantly greater gains on the NAEP 8th-grade math test than students in states with little or no state measures to improve student performance. Furthermore, students in high-accountability states do not have significantly higher retention or lower high school completion rates.
    Subject(s): Outcomes of education ; Grade repetition ; High school students ; Basic skills ; Test scores ; Mathematics ; High schools ; Coefficients ; Survival rates ; Hispanics
    ISSN: 0162-3737
    E-ISSN: 1935-1062
    Source: JSTOR Arts & Sciences IV
    Source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
    Source: © ProQuest LLC All rights reserved〈img src="https://exlibris-pub.s3.amazonaws.com/PQ_Logo.jpg" style="vertical-align:middle;margin-left:7px"〉
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  • 2
    Language: English
    In: Biological psychiatry (1969), 2006, Vol.60 (7), p.722-729
    Description: Pre-clinical and clinical studies have shown acute stress may impair working memory and visuo-spatial ability. This study was designed to clarify the nature of stress-induced cognitive deficits in soldiers and how such deficits may contribute to operational or battlefield errors. One hundred eighty-four Special Operations warfighters enrolled in Survival School completed pre-stress measures of dissociation and trauma exposure. Subjects were randomized to one of three assessment groups (Pre-stress, Stress, Post-stress) and were administered the Rey Ostereith Complex Figure (ROCF). All subjects completed post-stress measures of dissociation. ROCF copy and recall were normal in the Pre- and Post-stress groups. ROCF copy and recall were significantly impaired in the Stress Group. Stress group ROCF copy performance was piecemeal, and ROCF recall was impaired. Symptoms of dissociation were negatively associated with ROCF recall in the Stress group. Baseline dissociation and history of traumatic stress predicted cognitive impairment during stress. Stress exposure impaired visuo-spatial capacity and working memory. In rats, monkeys, and humans, high dopamine and NE turnover in the PFC induce deficits in cognition and spatial working memory. Improved understanding of stress-induced cognitive deficits may assist in identification of soldiers at risk and lead to the development of better countermeasures.
    Subject(s): survival school ; pre-frontal cortex ; Cognition ; military performance ; trauma exposure ; dissociation ; Fundamental and applied biological sciences. Psychology ; Human ; Psychology. Psychoanalysis. Psychiatry ; Memory ; Psychology. Psychophysiology ; Biological and medical sciences ; Learning. Memory ; Humans ; Military Personnel - psychology ; Male ; Dissociative Disorders - etiology ; Memory Disorders - etiology ; Space Perception ; Adult ; Female ; Form Perception ; Pattern Recognition, Visual ; Memory, Short-Term ; Stress, Psychological - complications ; Training ; Medical colleges ; Soldiers ; Military personnel ; Short-term memory ; Index Medicus
    ISSN: 0006-3223
    E-ISSN: 1873-2402
    Source: Backfile Package - All of Back Files EBS [ALLOFBCKF]
    Source: © ProQuest LLC All rights reserved〈img src="https://exlibris-pub.s3.amazonaws.com/PQ_Logo.jpg" style="vertical-align:middle;margin-left:7px"〉
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  • 3
    Language: English
    In: Technium Social Sciences Journal, 2020-04-26, Vol.7, p.74-85
    Description: Currently, teachers’ salaries in Zimbabwe are insufficient to sustain the harsh economic situation yet teachers seem to be meeting their monthly livelihood demands. A study to explore different survival strategies engaged by teachers under this current flopping economy was conducted in the Gweru urban. A total of 55 participants were randomly selected from five different schools. Questionnaires and in-depth interviews were used to collect data. Descriptive statistics and Chi-Square test for association (SPSS version 21) were used to analyse the data. Findings revealed that teachers have adopted 15 survival strategies to augment their meagre salaries. Over 50% of the teachers indicated that borrowing money from banks/microfinance institutions, conducting extra lessons, poultry production, cross border trading, part-time teaching at private schools, production of horticultural produce and selling of goods (maputi “dried corn”, sweets, peanut butter, snacks etc...) were pillars to their survival in this collapsing economy. Gender influenced the adoption of cross border trading (χ2 = 4.558; p 〈0.05) and hair dressing (χ2 = 10.102; p 〈0.005). Delivery of extra lesson was significantly associated with job title (χ2 = 5.026; p 〈0.05) constituting 70% teachers and 20% headmasters. It was observed that teachers with higher qualifications had a greater chances of being hired as part time private tutors in private schools. A greater proportion of the respondents (70.91%) agreed that venturing into these survival strategies impacted seriously on pupils’ overall performance. Thus teachers are recommended to balance their profession and private business to ensure that pupils’ performance is not compromised.
    Subject(s): flopping economy, survival strategies, teachers, school, livelihood
    ISSN: 2668-7798
    E-ISSN: 2668-7798
    Source: HeinOnline Law Journal Library
    Source: Directory of Open Access Journals
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  • 4
    Language: English
    In: Technium Social Sciences Journal, 2020-04-01, Vol.7, p.74-85
    Description: Currently, teachers’ salaries in Zimbabwe are insufficient to sustain the harsh economic situation yet teachers seem to be meeting their monthly livelihood demands. A study to explore different survival strategies engaged by teachers under this current flopping economy was conducted in the Gweru urban. A total of 55 participants were randomly selected from five different schools. Questionnaires and in-depth interviews were used to collect data. Descriptive statistics and Chi-Square test for association (SPSS version 21) were used to analyse the data. Findings revealed that teachers have adopted 15 survival strategies to augment their meagre salaries. Over 50% of the teachers indicated that borrowing money from banks/microfinance institutions, conducting extra lessons, poultry production, cross border trading, part-time teaching at private schools, production of horticultural produce and selling of goods (maputi “dried corn”, sweets, peanut butter, snacks etc...) were pillars to their survival in this collapsing economy. Gender influenced the adoption of cross border trading (χ2 = 4.558; p 〈0.05) and hair dressing (χ2 = 10.102; p 〈0.005). Delivery of extra lesson was significantly associated with job title (χ2 = 5.026; p 〈0.05) constituting 70% teachers and 20% headmasters. It was observed that teachers with higher qualifications had a greater chances of being hired as part time private tutors in private schools. A greater proportion of the respondents (70.91%) agreed that venturing into these survival strategies impacted seriously on pupils’ overall performance. Thus teachers are recommended to balance their profession and private business to ensure that pupils’ performance is not compromised.
    Subject(s): flopping economy, survival strategies, teachers, school, livelihood
    E-ISSN: 2668-7798
    Source: HeinOnline Law Journal Library
    Source: Directory of Open Access Journals
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  • 5
    Language: English
    In: The New England journal of medicine, 2016-01-07, Vol.374 (1), p.43-53
    Description: Antilymphocyte globulin (ATG) added to the conditioning regimen before allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation resulted in a lower rate of chronic graft-versus-host disease at 2 years than the rate without ATG (32% vs. 68%), with no apparent increased risk of relapse. Chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is a major complication of allogeneic stem-cell transplantation that results in later illness and death and a reduction in quality of life. 1 , 2 Risk factors for chronic GVHD are the use of peripheral blood as a source of stem cells, a history of acute GVHD, and the use of donated stem cells with high numbers of T cells. 3 – 7 In a meta-analysis, the Stem Cell Trialists’ Collaborative Group reported an incidence of extensive chronic GVHD of 47% after peripheral-blood stem-cell transplantation from an HLA-identical sibling. 4 In 2012, more than 70% of the stem-cell transplantations performed in . . .
    Subject(s): Graft vs Host Disease - epidemiology ; Prospective Studies ; Humans ; Immunosuppressive Agents - therapeutic use ; Middle Aged ; Proportional Hazards Models ; Child, Preschool ; Male ; Survival Rate ; Transplantation, Homologous ; Incidence ; Young Adult ; Disease-Free Survival ; Graft vs Host Disease - mortality ; Adolescent ; Antilymphocyte Serum - therapeutic use ; Adult ; Female ; Graft vs Host Disease - prevention & control ; T-Lymphocytes - immunology ; Child ; Chronic Disease ; Prevention ; Treatment outcome ; Graft versus host reaction ; Immunoglobulins ; Dosage and administration ; Analysis ; Graft-versus-host reaction ; Transplants & implants ; Leukemia ; Stem cell transplantation ; Lymphocytes T ; Preventive medicine ; Hemopoiesis ; Globulins ; Risk assessment ; Peripheral blood ; Stem cells ; Bone marrow ; Histocompatibility antigen HLA ; Index Medicus ; Abridged Index Medicus
    ISSN: 0028-4793
    E-ISSN: 1533-4406
    Source: Single Journals
    Source: © ProQuest LLC All rights reserved〈img src="https://exlibris-pub.s3.amazonaws.com/PQ_Logo.jpg" style="vertical-align:middle;margin-left:7px"〉
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  • 6
    Book
    Book
    2013
    ISBN: 0816674299  ISBN: 0816674280  ISBN: 9780816674282  ISBN: 9780816674299 
    Language: English
    Description: In the late 1960s, Indian families in Minneapolis and St. Paul were under siege. Clyde Bellecourt remembers, "We were losing our children during this time; juvenile courts were sweeping our children up, and they were fostering them out, and sometimes whole families were being broken up." In 1972, motivated by prejudice in the child welfare system and hostility in the public schools, American Indian Movement (AIM) organizers and local Native parents came together to start their own community school. For Pat Bellanger, it was about cultural survival. Though established in a moment of crisis, the school fulfilled a goal that she had worked toward for years: to create an educational system that would enable Native children "never to forget who they were." While AIM is best known for its national protests and political demands, the survival schools foreground the movement's local and regional engagement with issues of language, culture, spirituality, and identity. In telling of the evolution and impact of the Heart of the Earth school in Minneapolis and the Red School House in St. Paul, Julie L. Davis explains how the survival schools emerged out of AIM's local activism in education, child welfare, and juvenile justice and its efforts to achieve self-determination over urban Indian institutions. The schools provided informal, supportive, culturally relevant learning environments for students who had struggled in the public schools. Survival school classes, for example, were often conducted with students and instructors seated together in a circle, which signified the concept of mutual human respect. Davis reveals how the survival schools contributed to the global movement for Indigenous decolonization as they helped Indian youth and their families to reclaim their cultural identities and build a distinctive Native community. The story of these schools, unfolding here through the voices of activists, teachers, parents, and students, is also an in-depth history of AIM's founding and early community organizing in the Twin Cities-and evidence of its long-term effect on Indian people's lives.
    Subject(s): Schule ; Indianer ; Minnesota ; Geschichte (Histor) ; History ; Education ; Sociology ; Native American Studies ; United States ; SOCIAL SCIENCE ; State & Local ; Midwest (IA, IL, IN, KS, MI, MN, MO, ND, NE, OH, SD, WI) ; Ethnic Studies ; HISTORY ; Wine industry ; Vintners
    ISBN: 0816674299
    ISBN: 0816674280
    ISBN: 9780816674282
    ISBN: 9780816674299
    Source: Ebook Central - Academic Complete
    Source: © ProQuest LLC All rights reserved〈img src="https://exlibris-pub.s3.amazonaws.com/PQ_Logo.jpg" style="vertical-align:middle;margin-left:7px"〉
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  • 7
    Language: English
    In: Bone marrow transplantation (Basingstoke), 2015-02, Vol.50 (2), p.181-188
    Description: We analyzed the outcome of 243 children with high-risk (HR) AML in first CR1 enrolled in the AIEOP-2002/01 protocol, who were given either allogeneic (ALLO; n=141) or autologous (AUTO; n=102) hematopoietic SCT (HSCT), depending on the availability of a HLA-compatible sibling. Infants, patients with AML-M7, or complex karyotype or those with FLT3-ITD, were eligible to be transplanted also from alternative donors. All patients received a myeloablative regimen combining busulfan, cyclophosphamide and melphalan; [corrected] AUTO-HSCT patients received BM cells in most cases, while in children given ALLO-HSCT stem cell source was BM in 96, peripheral blood in 19 and cord blood in 26. With a median follow-up of 57 months (range 12-130), the probability of disease-free survival (DFS) was 73% and 63% in patients given either ALLO- or AUTO-HSCT, respectively (P=NS). Although the cumulative incidence (CI) of relapse was lower in ALLO- than in AUTO-HSCT recipients (17% vs 28%, respectively; P=0.043), the CI of TRM was 7% in both groups. Patients transplanted with unrelated donor cord blood had a remarkable 92.3% 8-year DFS probability. Altogether, these data confirm that HSCT is a suitable option for preventing leukemia recurrence in HR children with CR1 AML.
    Subject(s): Autografts ; Follow-Up Studies ; Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute - pathology ; Humans ; Child, Preschool ; Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation ; Infant ; Male ; Survival Rate ; Abnormal Karyotype ; Cord Blood Stem Cell Transplantation ; Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute - mortality ; fms-Like Tyrosine Kinase 3 - genetics ; Disease-Free Survival ; Allografts ; Adolescent ; Myeloablative Agonists - administration & dosage ; Female ; Transplantation Conditioning - methods ; Child ; Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute - therapy ; Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute - genetics ; Transplantation ; Health aspects ; Patient outcomes ; Hematopoietic stem cells ; Index Medicus
    ISSN: 0268-3369
    E-ISSN: 1476-5365
    Source: Nature Open Access
    Source: Elektronische Zeitschriftenbibliothek - Frei zugängliche E-Journals
    Source: Academic Search Ultimate
    Source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
    Source: © ProQuest LLC All rights reserved〈img src="https://exlibris-pub.s3.amazonaws.com/PQ_Logo.jpg" style="vertical-align:middle;margin-left:7px"〉
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  • 8
    Language: English
    In: Leukemia, 2018-11, Vol.32 (11), p.2316-2325
    Description: The survival of pediatric patients with multiply relapsed and/or refractory (R/R) B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia has historically been very poor; however, data are limited in the current era. We conducted a retrospective study to determine the outcome of multiply R/R childhood B-ALL treated at 24 TACL institutions between 2005 and 2013. Patient information, treatment, and response were collected. Prognostic factors influencing the complete remission (CR) rate and event-free survival (EFS) were analyzed. The analytic set included 578 salvage treatment attempts among 325 patients. CR rates (mean ± SE) were 51 ± 4% for patients with bone marrow R/R B-ALL who underwent a second salvage attempt, 37 ± 6% for a third attempt, and 31 ± 6% for the fourth through eighth attempts combined. For patients achieving a CR after their second, third, and fourth through eighth attempts, the 2 year EFS was 41 ± 6%, 13 ± 7%, and 27 ± 13% respectively. Our results showed slight improvement when compared to previous studies. This is the largest and most recent study to date that evaluates the outcome of this patient population. Our data will provide detailed reference for the evaluation of new agents being developed for childhood B-ALL.
    ISSN: 0887-6924
    E-ISSN: 1476-5551
    Source: Nature Open Access
    Source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
    Source: © ProQuest LLC All rights reserved〈img src="https://exlibris-pub.s3.amazonaws.com/PQ_Logo.jpg" style="vertical-align:middle;margin-left:7px"〉
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  • 9
    Language: English
    In: British journal of haematology, 2018-03, Vol.180 (5), p.680
    Description: Relapse remains the leading cause of treatment failure in children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) undergoing allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). We retrospectively investigated the prognostic role of minimal residual disease (MRD) before and after HSCT in 119 children transplanted in complete remission (CR). MRD was measured by polymerase chain reaction in bone marrow samples collected pre-HSCT and during the first and third trimesters after HSCT (post-HSCT1 and post-HSCT3). The overall event-free survival (EFS) was 50%. The cumulative incidence of relapse and non-relapse mortality was 41% and 9%. Any degree of detectable pre-HSCT MRD was associated with poor outcome: EFS was 39% and 18% in patients with MRD positivity 〈1 × 10 and ≥1 × 10 , respectively, versus 73% in MRD-negative patients (P 〈 0·001). This effect was maintained in different disease remissions, but low-level MRD had a very strong negative impact only in patients transplanted in second or further CR. Also, MRD after HSCT enabled patients to be stratified, with increasing MRD between post-HSCT1 and post-HSCT3 clearly defining cohorts with a different outcome. MRD is an important prognostic factor both before and after transplantation. Given that MRD persistence after HSCT is associated with dismal outcome, these patients could benefit from early discontinuation of immunosuppression, or pre-emptive immuno-therapy.
    Subject(s): Humans ; Child, Preschool ; Infant ; Male ; Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma - mortality ; Treatment Outcome ; Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation - mortality ; Neoplasm Recurrence, Local - etiology ; Transplantation, Homologous ; Neoplasm, Residual ; Disease-Free Survival ; Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma - therapy ; Adolescent ; Polymerase Chain Reaction ; Survival Analysis ; Female ; Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation - methods ; Child
    E-ISSN: 1365-2141
    Source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
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  • 10
    Article
    Article
    2004
    ISSN: 0193-9459 
    Language: English
    In: Western journal of nursing research, 2004-06, Vol.26 (4), p.444-460
    Description: This article is a historical case study of the organizational lifecycle of the DePauw University School of Nursing in Greencastle, Indiana. Few studies have examined schools of nursing over their entire lifecycles. The school was created in 1954, existed for 40 years, and closed in 1994. Organizational lifecycle theory posits that organizations undergo four stages: creation, transformation, decline, and closing or death. We used this theory to guide our study, which was based on data from interviews, archival documents, and institutional records. We found that factors associated with the creation of this organization had long-lasting effects, the external environment profoundly influenced the school, and that a shift in shared values and institutional linkages contributed to its closure. As society’s need and demand for nurses increases, the continuance of schools of nursing and reasons for their demise merits the attention of faculty and administrators.
    Subject(s): Schools, Nursing - organization & administration ; Indiana ; Social Values ; History, 20th Century ; Humans ; History, 19th Century ; Organizational Innovation ; Social Environment ; Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate ; Organizational Culture ; Organizational Case Studies ; Schools, Nursing - history ; Nursing schools ; History ; Organizational research ; Index Medicus ; Nursing
    ISSN: 0193-9459
    E-ISSN: 1552-8456
    Source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
    Source: © ProQuest LLC All rights reserved〈img src="https://exlibris-pub.s3.amazonaws.com/PQ_Logo.jpg" style="vertical-align:middle;margin-left:7px"〉
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