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  • 1
    Online Resource
    Online Resource
    2019
    ISBN: 9780691189789 
    Person(s): Marcus, Sharon
    Title: The Drama of Celebrity
    Publisher(s): Princeton University Press
    Year of publication: 2019
    Document type: Online Resource
    ISBN: 9780691189789
    Terms of use: Vorläufiger Zugriff bis zum Jahresende
    Abstract: A bold new account of how celebrity worksWhy do so many people care so much about celebrities? Who decides who gets to be a star? What are the privileges and pleasures of fandom? Do celebrities ever deserve the outsized attention they receive?In this fascinating and deeply researched book, Sharon Marcus challenges everything you thought you knew about our obsession with fame. Icons are not merely famous for being famous; the media alone cannot make or break stars; fans are not simply passive dupes. Instead, journalists, the public, and celebrities themselves all compete, passionately and expertly, to shape the stories we tell about celebrities and fans. The result: a high-stakes drama as endless as it is unpredictable.Drawing on scrapbooks, personal diaries, and vintage fan mail, Marcus traces celebrity culture back to its nineteenth-century roots, when people the world over found themselves captivated by celebrity chefs, bad-boy poets, and actors such as the "divine" Sarah Bernhardt (1844-1923), as famous in her day as the Beatles in theirs. Known in her youth for sleeping in a coffin, hailed in maturity as a woman of genius, Bernhardt became a global superstar thanks to savvy engagement with her era's most innovative media and technologies: the popular press, commercial photography, and speedy new forms of travel.Whether you love celebrity culture or hate it, The Drama of Celebrity will change how you think about one of the most important phenomena of modern times
    Link(s): Fulltext
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  • 2
    Online Resource
    Online Resource
    2019
    ISBN: 9780691189840 
    Title: Entitled
    Subtitle: Discriminating Tastes and the Expansion of the Arts
    Publisher(s): Princeton University Press
    Year of publication: 2019
    Document type: Online Resource
    ISBN: 9780691189840
    Terms of use: Vorläufiger Zugriff bis zum Jahresende
    Abstract: An in-depth look at how democratic values have widened the American arts scene, even as it remains elite and cosmopolitanTwo centuries ago, wealthy entrepreneurs founded the American cathedrals of culture-museums, theater companies, and symphony orchestras-to mirror European art. Today's American arts scene however has widened to embrace multitudes: photography, design, comics, graffiti, jazz, and many forms of folk, vernacular, and popular culture. What led to this dramatic expansion? In Entitled, Jennifer Lena shows how organizational transformations in the American art world-amidst a shifting political, economic, technological, and social landscape-made such change possible.By chronicling the development of American art from its earliest days to the present, Lena demonstrates that while the American arts may be more open, they are still unequal. She examines key historical moments, such as the creation of the Museum of Primitive Art and the funneling of federal and state subsidies during the New Deal to support the production and display of culture. Charting the efforts to define American genres, styles, creators, and audiences, Lena looks at the ways democratic values helped legitimate folk, vernacular, and commercial art that was viewed as non-elite. Yet, even as art lovers have acquired tastes for more diverse culture, they carefully select and curate works that reflect their cosmopolitan, elite, and moral tastes
    Link(s): Fulltext
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  • 3
    Online Resource
    Online Resource
    Updated edition with a New Preface 2014
    ISBN: 9781400865147 
    Person(s): Willis, Paul E
    Contributer: Willis, Paul E
    Title: Profane Culture
    Subtitle: Updated Edition
    Edition: Updated edition with a New Preface
    Publisher(s): Princeton University Press
    Year of publication: 2014
    Document type: Online Resource
    ISBN: 9781400865147
    Terms of use: Vorläufiger Zugriff bis zum Jahresende
    Abstract: A classic of British cultural studies, Profane Culture takes the reader into the worlds of two important 1960s youth cultures-the motor-bike boys and the hippies. The motor-bike boys were working-class motorcyclists who listened to the early rock 'n' roll of the late 1950s. In contrast, the hippies were middle-class drug users with long hair and a love of progressive music. Both groups were involved in an unequal but heroic fight to produce meaning and their own cultural forms in the face of a larger society dominated by the capitalist media and commercialism. They were pioneers of cultural experimentation, the self-construction of identity, and the curating of the self, which, in different ways, have become so widespread today.In Profane Culture, Paul Willis develops an important and still very contemporary theory and methodology for understanding the constructions of lived and popular culture. His new preface discusses the ties between the cultural moment explored in the book and today
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  • 4
    Online Resource
    Online Resource
    Core Textbook 2012
    ISBN: 9781400842445 
    Title: Climbing the Charts
    Subtitle: What Radio Airplay Tells Us about the Diffusion of Innovation
    Edition: Core Textbook
    Publisher(s): Princeton University Press
    Year of publication: 2012
    Document type: Online Resource
    ISBN: 9781400842445
    Terms of use: Vorläufiger Zugriff bis zum Jahresende
    Abstract: Despite the growth of digital media, traditional FM radio airplay still remains the essential way for musicians to achieve commercial success. Climbing the Charts examines how songs rise, or fail to rise, up the radio airplay charts. Looking at the relationships between record labels, tastemakers, and the public, Gabriel Rossman develops a clear picture of the roles of key players and the gatekeeping mechanisms in the commercial music industry. Along the way, he explores its massive inequalities, debunks many popular misconceptions about radio stations' abilities to dictate hits, and shows how a song diffuses throughout the nation to become a massive success. Contrary to the common belief that Clear Channel sees every sparrow that falls, Rossman demonstrates that corporate radio chains neither micromanage the routine decision of when to start playing a new single nor make top-down decisions to blacklist such politically inconvenient artists as the Dixie Chicks. Neither do stations imitate either ordinary peers or the so-called kingmaker radio stations who are wrongly believed to be able to make or break a single. Instead, Rossman shows that hits spread rapidly across radio because they clearly conform to an identifiable style or genre. Radio stations respond to these songs, and major labels put their money behind them through extensive marketing and promotion efforts, including the illegal yet time-honored practice of payoffs known within the industry as payola. Climbing the Charts provides a fresh take on the music industry and a model for understanding the diffusion of innovation
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  • 5
    Online Resource
    Online Resource
    Course Book 1998
    ISBN: 9781400822461 
    Person(s): Savran, David
    Title: Taking It Like a Man
    Subtitle: White Masculinity, Masochism, and Contemporary American Culture
    Edition: Course Book
    Publisher(s): Princeton University Press
    Year of publication: 1998
    Document type: Online Resource
    ISBN: 9781400822461
    Terms of use: Vorläufiger Zugriff bis zum Jahresende
    Abstract: From the Beat poets' incarnation of the "white Negro" through Iron John and the Men's Movement to the paranoid masculinity of Timothy McVeigh, white men in this country have increasingly imagined themselves as victims. In Taking It Like a Man, David Savran explores the social and sexual tensions that have helped to produce this phenomenon. Beginning with the 1940s, when many white, middle-class men moved into a rule-bound, corporate culture, Savran sifts through literary, cinematic, and journalistic examples that construct the white man as victimized, feminized, internally divided, and self-destructive. Savran considers how this widely perceived loss of male power has played itself out on both psychoanalytical and political levels as he draws upon various concepts of masochism--the most counterintuitive of the so-called perversions and the one most insistently associated with femininity.Savran begins with the writings and self-mythologization of Beat writers William Burroughs, Allen Ginsberg, and Jack Kerouac. Although their independent, law-defying lifestyles seemed distinctively and ruggedly masculine, their literary art and personal relations with other men in fact allowed them to take up social and psychic positions associated with women and racial minorities. Arguing that this dissident masculinity has become increasingly central to U.S. culture, Savran analyzes the success of Sam Shepard as both writer and star, as well as the emergence of a new kind of action hero in movies like Rambo and Twister. He contends that with the limited success of the civil rights and women's movements, white masculinity has been reconfigured to reflect the fantasy that the white male has become the victim of the scant progress made by African Americans and women.Taking It Like a Man provocatively applies psychoanalysis to history. The willingness to inflict pain upon the self, for example, serves as a measure of men's attempts to take control of their situations and their ambiguous relationship to women. Discussing S/M and sexual liberation in their historical contexts enables Savran to consider not only the psychological function of masochism but also the broader issues of political and social power as experienced by both men and women
    Link(s): Fulltext
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  • 6
    Online Resource
    Online Resource
    Course Book 1998
    ISBN: 9781400822584 
    Title: The Insistence of the Indian
    Subtitle: Race and Nationalism in Nineteenth-Century American Culture
    Edition: Course Book
    Publisher(s): Princeton University Press
    Year of publication: 1998
    Document type: Online Resource
    ISBN: 9781400822584
    Terms of use: Vorläufiger Zugriff bis zum Jahresende
    Abstract: Americans' first attempts to forge a national identity coincided with the apparent need to define--and limit--the status and rights of Native Americans. During these early decades of the nineteenth century, the image of the "Indian" circulated throughout popular culture--in the novels of James Fenimore Cooper, plays about Pocahontas, Indian captivity narratives, Black Hawk's autobiography, and visitors' guides to the national capitol. In exploring such sources as well as the political and legal rhetoric of the time, Susan Scheckel argues that the "Indian question" was intertwined with the ways in which Americans viewed their nation's past and envisioned its destiny. She shows how the Indians provided a crucial site of reflection upon national identity. And yet the Indians, by being denied the natural rights upon which the constitutional principles of the United States rested, also challenged American convictions of moral ascendancy and national legitimacy.Scheckel investigates, for example, the Supreme Court's decision on Indian land rights and James Fenimore Cooper's popular frontier romance The Pioneers: both attempted to legitimate American claims to land once owned by Indians and to assuage guilt associated with the violence of conquest by incorporating the Indians in a version of the American political "family." Alternatively, the widely performed Pocahontas plays dealt with the necessity of excluding Indians politically, but also portrayed these original inhabitants as embodying the potential of the continent itself. Such examples illustrate a gap between principles and practice. It is from this gap, according to the author, that the nation emerged, not as a coherent idea or a realist narrative, but as an ongoing performance that continues to play out, without resolution, fundamental ambivalences of American national identity
    Link(s): Fulltext
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