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  • 1
    Language: English
    In: BMC microbiology, 2021-07-02, Vol.21 (1), p.1-202
    Description: Abstract Background Tissues are valuable specimens in diagnostic microbiology because they are often obtained by invasive methods, and effort should thus be taken to maximize microbiological yield. The objective of this study was to evaluate the added value of using tissue pre-processing (tissue homogenizer instrument gentleMACS Dissociator) in detecting microorganisms responsible for infections. Methods We included 104 randomly collected tissue samples, 41 (39.4 %) bones and 63 (60.6 %) soft tissues, many of those (42/104 (40.4 %)) were of periprosthetic origins. We compared the agreement between pre-processing tissues using tissue homogenizer with routine microbiology diagnostic procedure, and we calculated the performance of these methods when clinical infections were used as reference standard. Results There was no significant difference between the two methods (McNemar test, p = 0.3). Among the positive culture using both methods (n = 62), 61 (98.4 %) showed at least one similar microorganism. Exactly similar microorganisms were found in 42/62 (67.7 %) of the samples. From the included tissues, 55/ 104 (52.9 %) were deemed as infected. We found that the sensitivity of homogenized tissue procedure was lower (83.6 %) than when tissue was processed using tissue homogenizer (89.1 %). Sub-analysis on periprosthetic tissues and soft or bone tissues showed comparable results. Conclusions The added value of GentleMACS Dissociator tissue homogenizer is limited in comparison to routine tissue processing.
    Subject(s): Added value ; Biological apparatus and supplies ; Bones ; Comparative analysis ; Composition ; culture ; Diagnostic specimens ; Diagnostic systems ; Endocarditis ; Infections ; Laboratories ; Medical microbiology ; microbiological yield ; Microbiology ; Microorganisms ; Performance evaluation ; Physiological aspects ; Prostheses ; Research ; Sample size ; Soft tissues ; tissue ; Tissue analysis ; tissue homogenizer ; Tissues ; Usage
    ISSN: 1471-2180
    E-ISSN: 1471-2180
    Source: BioMedCentral Open Access
    Source: Academic Search Ultimate
    Source: PubMed Central
    Source: DOAJ Directory of Open Access Journals - Not for CDI Discovery
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  • 2
    Language: English
    In: Annals of clinical microbiology and antimicrobials, 2020-09-14, Vol.19 (1), p.42-8
    Description: Colistin is considered as one of the last-resort antibiotics and reliable antimicrobial susceptibility testing is therefore crucial. The reference standard for AST according to EUCAST and CLSI is broth microdilution (BMD). However, BMD is labor intensive to perform. Commercial antimicrobial susceptibility tests derived from BMD method are available. We investigated the performance of four different commercial tests: Sensititre™, SensiTest™ Colistin, Micronaut MIC Strip Colistin and UMIC Colistin using 70 clinical isolates (half of them was deemed by VITEK2 as resistant), including isolates from cystic fibrosis patients and mcr-1 bearing isolates. We used two reference standards: BMD and composite MIC as determined by all four tests. Sensititre™ had essential agreement (EA, defined as minimum inhibitory concentration within ± 1 dilution) of 87% and 89% compared to BMD and composite reference standard, respectively. For SensiTest™, the EA’s were 93% and 90%. For UMIC, 87% and 90%, and for Micronaut, 83% and 84%. All four tests demonstrated categorical agreement (CA) above 90%. CA for SensiTest™ and Micronaut was both 96%, UMIC 94%, and Sensititre™ 93%. All tests were reproducible as tested in two quality control isolates. In conclusion, in clinical isolates from a large referral center, the four commercial tests for determination of colistin minimum inhibitory concentrations showed acceptable performance.
    Subject(s): Anti-Bacterial Agents - pharmacokinetics ; Antibiotics ; Antiinfectives and antibacterials ; Antimicrobial agents ; Broth microdilution ; Clinical isolates ; Colistin ; Colistin - pharmacology ; Cystic fibrosis ; Cystic Fibrosis - microbiology ; Dilution ; Drug resistance ; Drug Resistance, Bacterial - genetics ; E coli ; Humans ; Laboratories ; mcr-1 ; Microbial Sensitivity Tests - methods ; Microorganisms ; Minimum inhibitory concentration ; Minimum inhibitory concentration mcr-1 ; Quality control ; Reproducibility of Results ; Research ; Sensitivity and Specificity
    ISSN: 1476-0711
    E-ISSN: 1476-0711
    Source: BioMedCentral Open Access
    Source: PubMed Central
    Source: DOAJ Directory of Open Access Journals - Not for CDI Discovery
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  • 3
    Language: English
    In: Sexually transmitted infections, 2020-05, Vol.96 (3), p.220-222
    Description: ObjectiveIn the Netherlands, the Gonococcal Resistance to Antimicrobials Surveillance (GRAS) programme is carried out at Centres for Sexual Health (CSH), which provide care for sexual high-risk populations. However, half of gonorrhoea infections are diagnosed in general practice (GP). We performed a pilot study to explore expanding GRAS to GPs using laboratory-based surveillance. Additionally, antimicrobial resistance patterns of GP and CSH patients were compared.MethodsThree laboratories from different regions were included, which all perform gonorrhoea diagnostics for GPs and used ESwab for patient sampling. Additional culturing for all GP patients with gonorrhoea took place from February to July 2018. After positive PCR-nucleic acid amplification test, residual ESwab material was used for culture. In positive cultures, susceptibility testing was performed for azithromycin, ciprofloxacin, cefotaxime and ceftriaxone using Etest.ResultsDuring the study period, 484 samples were put in culture. 16.5% of cultures were positive (n=80). Antimicrobial resistance levels were low, with 2.6% resistance to azithromycin, 21.5% to ciprofloxacin and 0.0% to cefotaxime and ceftriaxone. Resistance levels in CSH GRAS data (first half of 2018) were 19.2% for azithromycin, 31.5% for ciprofloxacin, 1.9% for cefotaxime and 0.0% for ceftriaxone.ConclusionsCulture positivity rates for GP patients were low, probably due to long transportation times and awaiting PCR test results before attempting culture. Positivity rates might be improved by making changes in sampling and/or transportation methods, but that would require involvement of GPs and patients instead of keeping the surveillance lab based. Resistance levels appeared to be lower at GPs than at the CSH, indicating that resistance might emerge first in more high-risk populations. It is important to consider all potentially relevant patient populations when establishing a gonococcal antimicrobial resistance surveillance programme. However, based on the findings from this study the current GRAS programme will not be extended to GPs.
    Subject(s): 1506 ; Antimicrobial agents ; antimicrobial resistance ; Drug resistance ; Epidemiology ; general practice ; Gonorrhea ; Laboratories ; Neisseria gonorrhoeae ; Surveillance ; Urine
    ISSN: 1368-4973
    E-ISSN: 1472-3263
    Source: Hellenic Academic Libraries Link
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  • 4
    Language: English
    In: PloS one, 2015-03-03, Vol.10 (3), p.e0118454-e0118454
    Description: Background: Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Pa) infection is an important contributor to the progression of cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease. The cornerstone treatment for Pa infection is the use of inhaled antibiotics. However, there is substantial lung disease heterogeneity within and between patients that likely impacts deposition patterns of inhaled antibiotics. Therefore, this may result in airways below the minimal inhibitory concentration of the inhaled agent. Very little is known about antibiotic concentrations in small airways, in particular the effect of structural lung abnormalities. We therefore aimed to develop a patient-specific airway model to predict concentrations of inhaled antibiotics and to study the impact of structural lung changes and breathing profile on local concentrations in airways of patients with CF. Methods: In- and expiratory CT-scans of children with CF (5-17 years) were scored (CF-CT score), segmented and reconstructed into 3D airway models. Computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulations were performed on 40 airway models to predict local Aztreonam lysine for inhalation (AZLI) concentrations. Patient-specific lobar flow distribution and nebulization of 75 mg AZLI through a digital Pari eFlow model with mass median aerodynamic diameter range were used at the inlet of the airway model. AZLI concentrations for central and small airways were computed for different breathing patterns and airway surface liquid thicknesses. Results In most simulated conditions, concentrations in both central and small airways were well above the minimal inhibitory concentration. However, small airways in more diseased lobes were likely to receive suboptimal AZLI. Structural lung disease and increased tidal volumes, respiratory rates and larger particle sizes greatly reduced small airway concentrations. Conclusions: CFD modeling showed that concentrations of inhaled antibiotic delivered to the small airways are highly patient specific and vary throughout the bronchial tre
    Subject(s): Abnormalities ; Administration, Inhalation ; Adolescent ; Airway management ; Analysis ; Anti-Bacterial Agents - pharmacokinetics ; Anti-Bacterial Agents - pharmacology ; Antibiotics ; Asthma ; Aztreonam ; Aztreonam - pharmacokinetics ; Aztreonam - pharmacology ; Breathing ; Care and treatment ; Child ; Child, Preschool ; Children ; Computational fluid dynamics ; Computed tomography ; Computer applications ; Computer simulation ; Cystic fibrosis ; Cystic Fibrosis - complications ; Cystic Fibrosis - drug therapy ; Cystic Fibrosis - microbiology ; Cystic Fibrosis - pathology ; Drug Dosage Calculations ; Drug dosages ; Drug Monitoring ; Female ; Flow distribution ; Health aspects ; Hospitals ; Humans ; Infection ; Infections ; Inhalation ; Lobes ; Lung - drug effects ; Lung - microbiology ; Lung - pathology ; Lung diseases ; Lungs ; Lysine ; Male ; Mathematical models ; Medical treatment ; Microbial Sensitivity Tests ; Models ; Mutation ; Particle size ; Patient-Specific Modeling ; Patients ; Pediatrics ; Pseudomonas aeruginosa ; Pseudomonas aeruginosa - drug effects ; Pseudomonas aeruginosa - growth & development ; Pseudomonas Infections - complications ; Pseudomonas Infections - drug therapy ; Pseudomonas Infections - microbiology ; Pseudomonas Infections - pathology ; Respiration ; Respiratory Rate ; Respiratory tract ; Retrospective Studies ; Three dimensional models ; Tidal Volume ; Tomography ; Tomography, X-Ray Computed ; Treatment Outcome ; Usage
    ISSN: 1932-6203
    E-ISSN: 1932-6203
    Source: Academic Search Ultimate
    Source: PubMed Central
    Source: DOAJ Directory of Open Access Journals - Not for CDI Discovery
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  • 5
    Language: English
    In: Journal of clinical medicine, 2021-03-04, Vol.10 (5), p.1068
    Description: Infections in the ICU are often caused by Gram-negative bacteria. When these microorganisms are resistant to third-generation cephalosporines (due to extended-spectrum (ESBL) or AmpC beta-lactamases) or to carbapenems (for example carbapenem producing Enterobacteriales (CPE)), the treatment options become limited. In the last six years, fortunately, there have been new antibiotics approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) with predominant activities against Gram-negative bacteria. We aimed to review these antibiotics: plazomicin, eravacycline, temocillin, cefiderocol, ceftazidime/avibactam, ceftolozane/tazobactam, meropenem/vaborbactam, and imipenem/relebactam. Temocillin is an antibiotic that was only approved in Belgium and the UK several decades ago. We reviewed the in vitro activities of these new antibiotics, especially against ESBL and CPE microorganisms, potential side effects, and clinical studies in complicated urinary tract infections (cUTI), intra-abdominal infections (cIAI), and hospital-acquired pneumonia/ventilator-associatedpneumonia (HAP/VAP). All of these new antibiotics are active against ESBL, and almost all of them are active against CPE caused by KPC beta-lactamase, but only some of them are active against CPE due to MBL or OXA beta-lactamases. At present, all of these new antibiotics are approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for cUTI (except eravacycline) and most of them for cIAI (eravacycline, ceftazidime/avibactam, ceftolozane/tazobactam, and imipenem/relebactam) and for HAP or VAP (cefiderocol, ceftazidime/avibactam, ceftolozane/tazobactam, and imipenem/relebactam).
    Subject(s): Antibiotics ; Bacteria ; Bacterial proteins ; Brand names ; Clinical trials ; CPE ; E coli ; Enzymes ; ESBL ; FDA approval ; Genes ; Gram-negative bacteria ; Infections ; Microorganisms ; new antibiotics ; Pathogens ; Penicillin ; Pneumonia ; Protein synthesis ; Review ; Surveillance ; Urogenital system
    ISSN: 2077-0383
    E-ISSN: 2077-0383
    Source: Academic Search Ultimate
    Source: PubMed Central
    Source: ProQuest Central
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  • 6
    Language: English
    In: Sexually transmitted infections, 2021-02-25, Vol.98 (2), p.121-124
    Description: ObjectivesEuropean guidelines advise the use of dual nucleic acid amplification tests (NAAT) in order to minimise the inappropriate diagnosis of Neisseria gonorrhoeae (Ng) in urogenital samples from low prevalence areas and in extragenital specimens. In this cross-sectional study, we investigated the effect of confirmatory testing and confirmation policy on the Ng-positivity in a population visiting the sexual health clinic in Rotterdam, the Netherlands.MethodsApart from urogenital testing, extragenital (oropharyngeal/anorectal) testing was performed for men who have sex with men (MSM) and according to sexual exposure for women and heterosexual men. Ng detection using NAAT was performed using BD Viper and for confirmatory testing BD MAX. Sexual transmitted infection consultation data were merged with diagnostic data from August 2015 through May 2016.ResultsIn women (n=4175), oral testing was performed in 84% and 22% were tested anally. In MSM (n=1828), these percentages were 97% and 96%, respectively. Heterosexual men (n=3089) were tested urogenitally. After confirmatory testing, oropharyngeal positivity rates decreased from 7.3% (95% CI 6.5 to 8.2) to 1.5% (95% CI 1.1 to 1.8) in women and from 13.9% (95% CI 12.3 to 15.5) to 5.4% (95% CI 4.3 to 6.4) in MSM. Anorectal positivity rates decreased from 2.6% (95% CI 1.6 to 3.7) to 1.8% (95% CI 0.9 to 2.6) in women and from 9.3% (95% CI 7.9 to 10.7) to 7.2% (95% CI 6.0 to 8.5) in MSM. Urogenital Ng-positivity rate ranged between 3.0% and 4.4% and after confirmation between 2.3% and 3.9%. When confirming oropharyngeal samples, Ng-positivity was 3.8% in women, 3.0% in heterosexual men and 12.5% in MSM. Additional confirmation of urogenital and anorectal samples led to 3.0% Ng positivity in women, 2.7% in heterosexual men and 11.4% in MSM.ConclusionsConfirmation of urogenital and anorectal samples reduced the Ng-positivity rates, especially for women. However, as there is no gold standard for the confirmation of Ng infection, the dilemma within public health settings is to choose between two evils: missing diagnoses or overtreatment. In view of the large decrease in oropharyngeal positivity, confirmation Ng-positivity in oropharyngeal samples remains essential to avoid unnecessary treatment.
    Subject(s): Asymptomatic ; Cross-Sectional Studies ; Epidemiology ; epidemiology (general) ; Female ; Gonorrhea ; Gonorrhea - diagnosis ; Gonorrhea - drug therapy ; Gonorrhea - epidemiology ; Health services ; Heterosexuality - statistics & numerical data ; Homosexuality, Male - statistics & numerical data ; Humans ; Infections ; Infectious diseases ; Male ; Molecular Diagnostic Techniques - methods ; Molecular Diagnostic Techniques - standards ; neisseria gonorrhoeae ; Neisseria gonorrhoeae - genetics ; Neisseria gonorrhoeae - isolation & purification ; Netherlands - epidemiology ; Population ; Prevalence ; Public health ; Retrospective Studies ; risk factors ; Sexual Behavior ; Sexual Health ; testing ; Womens health
    ISSN: 1368-4973
    E-ISSN: 1472-3263
    Source: Hellenic Academic Libraries Link
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  • 7
    Language: English
    In: Journal of clinical microbiology, 2021-02-18, Vol.59 (3)
    Description: The aim of this study was to describe the frequency of positive tests in COVID-19 patients and investigate the association between COVID-19 and a positive test result. We compared the proportion of positive tests in COVID-19 patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) for 〉24 h with two control groups: patients with community-acquired pneumonia with (i) a PCR-confirmed influenza infection (considered a positive control since the link between influenza and invasive aspergillosis has been established) and (ii) pneumonia (in whom positive tests are mostly considered as colonization). During the study period, 92 COVID-19 patients (mean [standard deviation] age, 62 [14] years; 76.1% males), 48 influenza patients (55 [14]; 56.2% males), and 65 pneumococcal pneumonia patients (58 [15], 63,1% males) were identified. Any positive test from any respiratory sample was found in 10.9% of the COVID-19 patients, 6.2% of the patients with pneumococcal pneumonia, and 22.9% of those infected with influenza. A positive culture or PCR or galactomannan test on bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid only was found in 5.4% of COVID-19 patients, which was lower than in patients with influenza (18.8%) and comparable to that in the pneumococcal pneumonia group (4.6%). Using logistic regression analysis, the odds ratio (OR) (95% confidence interval) for a positive test on BAL fluid for COVID-19 patients was 1.2 (0.3 to 5.1;  = 0.8) compared to the pneumococcal pneumonia group, while it was 0.2 (0.1 to 0.8;  = 0.02) compared to the influenza group. This difference remained significant when corrected for age and sex. In conclusion, in COVID-19 patients, the prevalence of a positive test was comparable to that in patients admitted for pneumococcal pneumonia but substantially lower than what we observed in patients with influenza.
    Subject(s): Aged ; Aspergillus ; Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid ; COVID-19 ; COVID-19 - complications ; Female ; galactomannan ; Humans ; Intensive Care Units ; invasive aspergillosis ; Invasive Pulmonary Aspergillosis - diagnosis ; Invasive Pulmonary Aspergillosis - epidemiology ; Male ; Mannans ; Middle Aged ; Mycology
    ISSN: 0095-1137
    E-ISSN: 1098-660X
    Source: HighWire Press (Free Journals)
    Source: Hellenic Academic Libraries Link
    Source: PubMed Central
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  • 8
    Language: English
    In: American journal of respiratory and critical care medicine, 2016-03-01, Vol.193 (5), p.504-515
    Description: Cystic fibrosis (CF) is characterized by early structural lung disease caused by pulmonary infections. The nasopharynx of infants is a major ecological reservoir of potential respiratory pathogens. To investigate the development of nasopharyngeal microbiota profiles in infants with CF compared with those of healthy control subjects during the first 6 months of life. We conducted a prospective cohort study, from the time of diagnosis onward, in which we collected questionnaires and 324 nasopharynx samples from 20 infants with CF and 45 age-matched healthy control subjects. Microbiota profiles were characterized by 16S ribosomal RNA-based sequencing. We observed significant differences in microbial community composition (P 〈 0.0002 by permutational multivariate analysis of variance) and development between groups. In infants with CF, early Staphylococcus aureus and, to a lesser extent, Corynebacterium spp. and Moraxella spp. dominance were followed by a switch to Streptococcus mitis predominance after 3 months of age. In control subjects, Moraxella spp. enrichment occurred throughout the first 6 months of life. In a multivariate analysis, S. aureus, S. mitis, Corynebacterium accolens, and bacilli were significantly more abundant in infants with CF, whereas Moraxella spp., Corynebacterium pseudodiphtericum and Corynebacterium propinquum and Haemophilus influenzae were significantly more abundant in control subjects, after correction for age, antibiotic use, and respiratory symptoms. Antibiotic use was independently associated with increased colonization of gram-negative bacteria such as Burkholderia spp. and members of the Enterobacteriaceae bacteria family and reduced colonization of potential beneficial commensals. From diagnosis onward, we observed distinct patterns of nasopharyngeal microbiota development in infants with CF under 6 months of age compared with control subjects and a marked effect of antibiotic therapy leading toward a gram-negative microbial composition.
    Subject(s): Abridged Index Medicus ; Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use ; Burkholderia - genetics ; Burkholderia Infections - drug therapy ; Burkholderia Infections - epidemiology ; Burkholderia Infections - microbiology ; Carrier State - epidemiology ; Carrier State - microbiology ; Case-Control Studies ; Cohort Studies ; Corynebacterium - genetics ; Corynebacterium Infections - drug therapy ; Corynebacterium Infections - epidemiology ; Corynebacterium Infections - microbiology ; Cystic Fibrosis - epidemiology ; Cystic Fibrosis - microbiology ; DNA, Bacterial - genetics ; Enterobacteriaceae - genetics ; Enterobacteriaceae Infections - drug therapy ; Enterobacteriaceae Infections - epidemiology ; Enterobacteriaceae Infections - microbiology ; Female ; Haemophilus Infections - drug therapy ; Haemophilus Infections - epidemiology ; Haemophilus Infections - microbiology ; Haemophilus influenzae - genetics ; Humans ; Infant ; Infant, Newborn ; Male ; Microbiota - genetics ; Moraxella - genetics ; Moraxellaceae Infections - drug therapy ; Moraxellaceae Infections - epidemiology ; Moraxellaceae Infections - microbiology ; Nasopharynx - microbiology ; Prospective Studies ; Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction ; RNA, Ribosomal, 16S - genetics ; Staphylococcal Infections - drug therapy ; Staphylococcal Infections - epidemiology ; Staphylococcal Infections - microbiology ; Staphylococcus aureus - genetics ; Streptococcal Infections - drug therapy ; Streptococcal Infections - epidemiology ; Streptococcal Infections - microbiology ; Streptococcus mitis - genetics
    ISSN: 1073-449X
    E-ISSN: 1535-4970
    Source: Elektronische Zeitschriftenbibliothek - Frei zugängliche E-Journals
    Source: ProQuest Central
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  • 9
    Language: English
    In: Sexually transmitted infections, 2019-07, Vol.95 (Suppl 1), p.A279
    Description: BackgroundIn the Netherlands, the gonorrhoea resistance to antimicrobials surveillance (GRAS) programme is carried out at STI clinics, which provide care for high-risk populations. However, half of gonorrhoea infections are diagnosed in general practice (GP). We performed a pilot study to explore expanding GRAS to the GP population using laboratory-based surveillance. Additionally, antimicrobial resistance patterns of GP and STI clinic patients were compared.MethodsThree laboratories from different regions were included, which all perform gonorrhoea diagnostics for GPs and STI clinics and used eSwab for patient sampling. Additional culturing for all GP patients with gonorrhoea took place from February to July 2018. After positive PCR-NAAT test, residual eSwab material was used for culture. In positive cultures, susceptibility testing was performed for azithromycin, ciprofloxacin, cefotaxime and ceftriaxone using Etest.ResultsDuring the study period, 484 samples were put in culture. 16.5% of cultures were positive (n=80). Antimicrobial resistance levels were low, with 2.6% resistance to azithromycin, 21.5% to ciprofloxacin and 0.0% to cefotaxime and ceftriaxone. Resistance levels in STI clinic GRAS data (first half of 2018) were 19.2% for azithromycin, 31.5% for ciprofloxacin, 1.9% for cefotaxime and 0.0% for ceftriaxone.ConclusionCulture positivity rates for GP patients were low, probably due to long transportation times and awaiting PCR test results. Positivity rates might be improved by making changes in sampling and/or transportation methods, but that would require involvement of GPs and patients instead of keeping the surveillance lab-based. Resistance levels appeared to be much lower at the GP than at STI clinics, indicating that resistance might emerge first in more high-risk populations that visit the STI clinics. It is important to consider all potentially relevant patient populations when establishing a surveillance programme. Based on the findings from this study the current GRAS programme will not be extended to the GP population.DisclosureNo significant relationships.
    Subject(s): Antimicrobial agents ; Clinics ; Drug resistance ; Gonorrhea ; Laboratories ; Patients ; Surveillance
    ISSN: 1368-4973
    E-ISSN: 1472-3263
    Source: Hellenic Academic Libraries Link
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  • 10
    Language: English
    In: Antonie van Leeuwenhoek, 2021-08-31, Vol.114 (10), p.1721-1733
    Description: To improve understanding of the role of Ralstonia in cystic fibrosis (CF), whole genomes of 18 strains from clinical samples were sequenced using Illumina technology. Sequences were analysed by core genome Multi-Locus Sequence Typing, Average Nucleotide Identity based on BLAST (ANIb), RAST annotation, and by ResFinder. Phylogenetic analysis was performed for the 16S rRNA gene, and the OXA-22 and OXA-60 ß-lactamase families. The minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were determined using broth microdilution. ANIb data for the 18 isolates and 54 strains from GenBank, supported by phylogenetic analysis, showed that 8 groups of clusters (A-H), as well as subgroups that should be considered as species or subspecies. Groups A-C contain strains previously identified as Ralstonia solanacearum and Ralstonia pseudosolanacearum . We propose that group A is a novel species. Group B and C are Ralstonia syzygii , Ralstonia solanacearum , respectively. Group D is composed of Ralstonia mannitolilytica and Group E of Ralstonia pickettii . Group F and G should be considered novel species. Group H strains belong to R. insidiosa . OXA-22 and OXA-60 family ß-lactamases were encoded by all strains. Co-trimoxazole generally showed high activity with low MICs (≤1 mg/l) as did ciprofloxacin (≤0.12 mg/l). MICs against the other antibiotics were more variable, but generally high. RAST annotation revealed limited differences between the strains, and virulence factors were not identified. The taxonomy of the genus Ralstonia is in need of revision, but sequencing additional isolates is needed. Antibiotic resistance levels are high. Annotation did not identify potential virulence factors.
    Subject(s): Annotations ; Antibiotic resistance ; Antibiotics ; Biomedical and Life Sciences ; Ciprofloxacin ; Cotrimoxazole ; Cystic fibrosis ; Databases ; Drug resistance in microorganisms ; Genomes ; Genomics ; Humans ; Life Sciences ; Medical Microbiology ; Microbiology ; Multilocus Sequence Typing ; Nucleotide sequence ; Nucleotides ; Original Paper ; Oxalic acid ; Phylogenetics ; Phylogeny ; Plant Sciences ; Ralstonia - genetics ; Ralstonia solanacearum ; RNA ; RNA, Ribosomal, 16S - genetics ; rRNA 16S ; Soil bacteria ; Soil Science & Conservation ; Species ; Subgroups ; Taxonomic revision ; Taxonomy ; Technology assessment ; Virulence ; Virulence (Microbiology) ; Virulence factors ; β Lactamase
    ISSN: 0003-6072
    E-ISSN: 1572-9699
    Source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
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