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  • 1
    Language: English
    In: The American journal of clinical nutrition, 2012, Vol.96 (2), p.397-404
    Description: Background: Although dietary recommendations have focused on restricting saturated fat (SF) consumption to reduce cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk, evidence from prospective studies has not supported a strong link between total SF intake and CVD events. An understanding of whether food sources of SF influence these relations may provide new insights. Objective: We investigated the association of SF consumption from different food sources and the incidence of CVD events in a multi-ethnic population. Design: Participants who were 45-84 y old at baseline (n = 5209) were followed from 2000 to 2010. Diet was assessed by using a 120-item food-frequency questionnaire. CVD incidence (316 cases) was assessed during follow-up visits. Results: After adjustment for demographics, lifestyle, and dietary confounders, a higher intake of dairy SF was associated with lower CVD risk [HR (95% CI) for +5 g/d and +5% of energy from dairy SF: 0.79 (0.68, 0.92) and 0.62 (0.47, 0.82), respectively]. In contrast, a higher intake of meat SF was associated with greater CVD risk [HR (95% CI) for +5 g/d and a +5% of energy from meat SF: 1.26 (1.02, 1.54) and 1.48 (0.98, 2.23), respectively]. The substitution of 2% of energy from meat SF with energy from dairy SF was associated with a 25% lower CVD risk [HR (95% CI): 0.75 (0.63, 0.91)]. No associations were observed between plant or butter SF and CVD risk, but ranges of intakes were narrow. Conclusion: Associations of SF with health may depend on food-specific fatty acids or other nutrient constituents in foods that contain SF, in addition to SF. Am J Clin Nutr 2012;96:397-404.
    Subject(s): metaanalysis ; womens health ; mesa ; risk-factors ; patterns ; coronary-heart-disease ; cholesterol ; consumption ; blood-pressure ; hypertension ; Fundamental and applied biological sciences. Psychology ; Feeding. Feeding behavior ; Biological and medical sciences ; Vertebrates: anatomy and physiology, studies on body, several organs or systems ; Life Style ; Prospective Studies ; Follow-Up Studies ; Meat - analysis ; Humans ; Middle Aged ; Risk Factors ; Feeding Behavior ; Male ; Atherosclerosis - epidemiology ; Incidence ; Nutrition Assessment ; Atherosclerosis - etiology ; Regression Analysis ; Animals ; Diet ; Cattle ; Dietary Fats - administration & dosage ; Aged, 80 and over ; Fatty Acids - administration & dosage ; Female ; Surveys and Questionnaires ; Aged ; Dairy Products - analysis ; Control ; Cardiovascular diseases ; Health aspects ; Saturated fatty acids ; Food habits ; Risk factors ; Index Medicus ; Abridged Index Medicus
    ISSN: 0002-9165
    E-ISSN: 1938-3207
    Source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
    Source: © ProQuest LLC All rights reserved〈img src="https://exlibris-pub.s3.amazonaws.com/PQ_Logo.jpg" style="vertical-align:middle;margin-left:7px"〉
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  • 2
    Language: English
    In: The American journal of clinical nutrition, 2013, Vol.98 (1), p.160-173
    Description: Clinical hypomagnesemia and experimental restriction of dietary magnesium increase cardiac arrhythmias. However, whether or not circulating or dietary magnesium at usual concentrations or intakes influences the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD), including fatal ischemic heart disease (IHD), is unclear. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to investigate prospective associations of circulating and dietary magnesium with incidence of CVD, IHD, and fatal IHD. Multiple literature databases were systematically searched without language restriction through May 2012. Inclusion decisions and data extraction were performed in duplicate. Linear dose-response associations were assessed by using random-effects meta-regression. Potential nonlinear associations were evaluated by using restricted cubic splines. Of 2303 articles, 16 studies met the eligibility criteria; these studies comprised 313,041 individuals and 11,995 CVD, 7534 IHD, and 2686 fatal IHD events. Circulating magnesium (per 0.2 mmol/L increment) was associated with a 30% lower risk of CVD (RR: 0.70; 95% CI: 0.56, 0.88 per 0.2 mmol/L) and trends toward lower risks of IHD (RR: 0.83; 95% CI: 0.75, 1.05) and fatal IHD (RR: 0.61; 95% CI: 0.37, 1.00). Dietary magnesium (per 200-mg/d increment) was not significantly associated with CVD (RR: 0.89; 95% CI: 0.75, 1.05) but was associated with a 22% lower risk of IHD (RR: 0.78; 95% CI: 0.67, 0.92). The association of dietary magnesium with fatal IHD was nonlinear (P 〈 0.001), with an inverse association observed up to a threshold of ∼250 mg/d (RR: 0.73; 95% CI: 0.62, 0.86), compared with lower intakes. Circulating and dietary magnesium are inversely associated with CVD risk, which supports the need for clinical trials to evaluate the potential role of magnesium in the prevention of CVD and IHD.
    Subject(s): Fundamental and applied biological sciences. Psychology ; Feeding. Feeding behavior ; Biological and medical sciences ; Vertebrates: anatomy and physiology, studies on body, several organs or systems ; Diet ; Cardiovascular Diseases - prevention & control ; Humans ; Risk Factors ; Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology ; Dietary Supplements ; Magnesium - blood ; Databases, Factual ; Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic ; Prevention ; Complications and side effects ; Research ; Cardiovascular diseases ; Magnesium deficiency diseases ; Risk factors ; Index Medicus ; Abridged Index Medicus
    ISSN: 0002-9165
    E-ISSN: 1938-3207
    Source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
    Source: © ProQuest LLC All rights reserved〈img src="https://exlibris-pub.s3.amazonaws.com/PQ_Logo.jpg" style="vertical-align:middle;margin-left:7px"〉
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  • 3
    Language: English
    In: The American journal of clinical nutrition, 2013, Vol.97 (4), p.854-861
    Description: Dairy consumption is linked to a lower risk of type 2 diabetes, but constituents responsible for this relation are not established. Emerging evidence suggests that trans-palmitoleate (trans 16:1n-7), a fatty acid in dairy and also partially hydrogenated oils, may be associated with a more favorable metabolic profile and less incident diabetes. We investigated the association of trans-palmitoleate with metabolic risk and incident diabetes in a multiethnic US cohort. Phospholipid fatty acids and metabolic risk factors were measured in 2000-2002 among 2617 adults in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA), a cohort of white, black, Hispanic, and Chinese Americans. In 2281 participants free of baseline diabetes, we also prospectively assessed the risk of new-onset diabetes (205 cases) from baseline to 2005-2007. trans-Palmitoleate concentrations correlated positively with self-reported consumption of whole-fat dairy, butter, margarine, and baked desserts and with other circulating biomarkers of both dairy fat and partially hydrogenated oil consumption, which suggested mixed dietary sources. After multivariable adjustment, trans-palmitoleate concentrations were associated with higher LDL cholesterol (quintile 5 compared with quintile 1: +6.4%; P-trend = 0.005), lower triglycerides (-19.1%; P-trend 〈 0.001), lower fasting insulin (-9.1%; P-trend = 0.002), and lower systolic blood pressure (-2.4 mm Hg; P-trend = 0.01). In prospective analyses, trans-palmitoleate was independently associated with lower incident diabetes (P-trend = 0.02), including a 48% lower risk in quintile 5 compared with quintile 1 (HR: 0.52; 95% CI: 0.32, 0.85). All findings were similar between men and women and between different race-ethnic subgroups. Circulating trans-palmitoleate is associated with higher LDL cholesterol but also with lower triglycerides, fasting insulin, blood pressure, and incident diabetes in a multiethnic US cohort. Our findings support the need for further experimental and dietary intervention studies that target circulating trans-palmitoleate. The MESA trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00005487.
    Subject(s): Fundamental and applied biological sciences. Psychology ; Feeding. Feeding behavior ; Diabetes. Impaired glucose tolerance ; Vertebrates: anatomy and physiology, studies on body, several organs or systems ; Biological and medical sciences ; Endocrinopathies ; Medical sciences ; Endocrine pancreas. Apud cells (diseases) ; Blood Pressure ; Diabetes Mellitus - blood ; Fatty Acids, Monounsaturated - pharmacology ; Prospective Studies ; United States ; Humans ; Middle Aged ; Trans Fatty Acids - adverse effects ; Male ; Trans Fatty Acids - therapeutic use ; Insulin - blood ; Hydrogenation ; Ethnic Groups ; Fatty Acids, Monounsaturated - therapeutic use ; Dietary Fats - pharmacology ; Fatty Acids, Monounsaturated - adverse effects ; Lipids - blood ; Atherosclerosis ; Cholesterol, LDL - blood ; Fatty Acids, Monounsaturated - blood ; Female ; Phospholipids - metabolism ; Dairy Products ; Trans Fatty Acids - pharmacology ; Dietary Fats - adverse effects ; Risk Factors ; Dietary Fats - therapeutic use ; Biomarkers - blood ; Dietary Fats - blood ; Diabetes Mellitus - prevention & control ; Diet ; Triglycerides - blood ; Aged ; Trans Fatty Acids - blood ; Type 2 diabetes ; Prevention ; Dairy products ; Research ; Health aspects ; Risk factors ; Index Medicus ; Abridged Index Medicus
    ISSN: 0002-9165
    E-ISSN: 1938-3207
    Source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
    Source: © ProQuest LLC All rights reserved〈img src="https://exlibris-pub.s3.amazonaws.com/PQ_Logo.jpg" style="vertical-align:middle;margin-left:7px"〉
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  • 4
    Language: English
    In: The American journal of clinical nutrition, 2018-09-01, Vol.108 (3), p.476-484
    Description: ABSTRACT Background Controversy has emerged about the benefits compared with harms of dairy fat, including concerns over long-term effects. Previous observational studies have assessed self-reported estimates of consumption or a single biomarker measure at baseline, which may lead to suboptimal estimation of true risk. Objective The aim of this study was to investigate prospective associations of serial measures of plasma phospholipid fatty acids pentadecanoic (15:0), heptadecanoic (17:0), and trans-palmitoleic (trans-16:1n–7) acids with total mortality, cause-specific mortality, and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk among older adults. Design Among 2907 US adults aged ≥65 y and free of CVD at baseline, circulating fatty acid concentrations were measured serially at baseline, 6 y, and 13 y. Deaths and CVD events were assessed and adjudicated centrally. Prospective associations were assessed by multivariate-adjusted Cox models incorporating time-dependent exposures and covariates. Results During 22 y of follow-up, 2428 deaths occurred, including 833 from CVD, 1595 from non-CVD causes, and 1301 incident CVD events. In multivariable models, circulating pentadecanoic, heptadecanoic, and trans-palmitoleic acids were not significantly associated with total mortality, with extreme-quintile HRs of 1.05 for pentadecanoic (95% CI: 0.91, 1.22), 1.07 for heptadecanoic (95% CI: 0.93, 1.23), and 1.05 for trans-palmitoleic (95% CI: 0.91, 1.20) acids. Circulating heptadecanoic acid was associated with lower CVD mortality (extreme-quintile HR: 0.77; 95% CI: 0.61, 0.98), especially stroke mortality, with a 42% lower risk when comparing extreme quintiles of heptadecanoic acid concentrations (HR: 0.58; 95% CI: 0.35, 0.97). In contrast, heptadecanoic acid was associated with a higher risk of non-CVD mortality (HR: 1.27; 95% CI: 1.07, 1.52), which was not clearly related to any single subtype of non-CVD death. No significant associations of pentadecanoic, heptadecanoic, or trans-palmitoleic acids were seen for total incident CVD, coronary heart disease, or stroke. Conclusions Long-term exposure to circulating phospholipid pentadecanoic, heptadecanoic, or trans-palmitoleic acids was not significantly associated with total mortality or incident CVD among older adults. High circulating heptadecanoic acid was inversely associated with CVD and stroke mortality and potentially associated with higher risk of non-CVD death.
    Subject(s): Prospective Studies ; Humans ; Risk Factors ; Biomarkers - blood ; Cause of Death ; Stroke - blood ; Dietary Fats - administration & dosage ; Cardiovascular Diseases - blood ; Cardiovascular Diseases - mortality ; Fatty Acids, Monounsaturated - blood ; Aged ; Dairy Products - analysis ; Fatty Acids - blood ; Stroke - mortality ; Dairy products ; Nutritional aspects ; Dietary fat ; Physiological aspects ; Cardiovascular diseases ; Food and nutrition ; Biological markers ; Health aspects ; Fatty acids ; Risk factors ; mortality ; epidemiology ; Original Research Communications ; cardiovascular diseases ; fatty acids ; dairy
    ISSN: 0002-9165
    E-ISSN: 1938-3207
    Source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
    Source: © ProQuest LLC All rights reserved〈img src="https://exlibris-pub.s3.amazonaws.com/PQ_Logo.jpg" style="vertical-align:middle;margin-left:7px"〉
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  • 5
    Language: English
    In: Genetics in medicine, 2019-01, Vol.21 (1), p.3-16
    Description: Availability of clinical genomic sequencing (CGS) has generated questions about the value of genome and exome sequencing as a diagnostic tool. Analysis of reported CGS application can inform uptake and direct further research. This scoping literature review aims to synthesize evidence on the clinical and economic impact of CGS. PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane were searched for peer-reviewed articles published between 2009 and 2017 on diagnostic CGS for infant and pediatric patients. Articles were classified according to sample size and whether economic evaluation was a primary research objective. Data on patient characteristics, clinical setting, and outcomes were extracted and narratively synthesized. Of 171 included articles, 131 were case reports, 40 were aggregate analyses, and 4 had a primary economic evaluation aim. Diagnostic yield was the only consistently reported outcome. Median diagnostic yield in aggregate analyses was 33.2% but varied by broad clinical categories and test type. Reported CGS use has rapidly increased and spans diverse clinical settings and patient phenotypes. Economic evaluations support the cost-saving potential of diagnostic CGS. Multidisciplinary implementation research, including more robust outcome measurement and economic evaluation, is needed to demonstrate clinical utility and cost-effectiveness of CGS.
    Subject(s): Pediatrics - trends ; Exome - genetics ; Whole Exome Sequencing - economics ; Cost-Benefit Analysis ; Humans ; Genetic Diseases, Inborn - genetics ; Whole Genome Sequencing - economics ; Genetic Diseases, Inborn - diagnosis ; Whole Exome Sequencing - trends ; Genome, Human - genetics ; Whole Genome Sequencing - trends ; Pediatrics ; Genomes ; Index Medicus
    ISSN: 1098-3600
    E-ISSN: 1530-0366
    Source: Nature Open Access
    Source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
    Source: © ProQuest LLC All rights reserved〈img src="https://exlibris-pub.s3.amazonaws.com/PQ_Logo.jpg" style="vertical-align:middle;margin-left:7px"〉
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  • 6
    Language: English
    In: BMJ (Clinical research ed.), 2018-10-17, Vol.363, p.k4067-k4067
    Description: To determine the longitudinal association between serial biomarker measures of circulating omega 3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (n3-PUFA) levels and healthy ageing. Prospective cohort study. Four communities in the United States (Cardiovascular Health Study) from 1992 to 2015. 2622 adults with a mean (SD) age of 74.4 (4.8) and with successful healthy ageing at baseline in 1992-93. Cumulative levels of plasma phospholipid n3-PUFAs were measured using gas chromatography in 1992-93, 1998-99, and 2005-06, expressed as percentage of total fatty acids, including α-linolenic acid from plants and eicosapentaenoic acid, docosapentaenoic acid, and docosahexaenoic acid from seafoood. Healthy ageing defined as survival without chronic diseases (ie, cardiovascular disease, cancer, lung disease, and severe chronic kidney disease), the absence of cognitive and physical dysfunction, or death from other causes not part of the healthy ageing outcome after age 65. Events were centrally adjudicated or determined from medical records and diagnostic tests. Higher levels of long chain n3-PUFAs were associated with an 18% lower risk (95% confidence interval 7% to 28%) of unhealthy ageing per interquintile range after multivariable adjustments with time-varying exposure and covariates. Individually, higher eicosapentaenoic acid and docosapentaenoic acid (but not docosahexaenoic acid) levels were associated with a lower risk: 15% (6% to 23%) and 16% (6% to 25%), respectively. α-linolenic acid from plants was not noticeably associated with unhealthy ageing (hazard ratio 0.92, 95% confidence interval 0.83 to 1.02). In older adults, a higher cumulative level of serially measured circulating n3-PUFAs from seafood (eicosapentaenoic acid, docosapentaenoic acid, and docosahexaenoic acid), eicosapentaenoic acid, and docosapentaenoic acid (but not docosahexaenoic acid from seafood or α-linolenic acid from plants) was associated with a higher likelihood of healthy ageing. These findings support guidelines for increased dietary consumption of n3-PUFAs in older adults.
    Subject(s): Index Medicus ; Abridged Index Medicus
    ISSN: 0959-8138
    E-ISSN: 1756-1833
    Source: Single Journals
    Source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
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  • 7
    Language: English
    In: BMJ, 2019-07-03, Vol.366, p.l4137-l4137
    Description: The 2018 WHO draft guidance on fatty acids fails to consider the importance of the food matrix, argue Arne Astrup and colleagues
    Subject(s): MORTALITY ; METAANALYSIS ; 18 COUNTRIES ; NUTRIENTS ; CARDIOVASCULAR-DISEASE ; CHOCOLATE CONSUMPTION ; PREVENTION ; RISK ; ASSOCIATION ; LIPIDS ; Guidelines as Topic ; Fatty Acids ; World Health Organization ; Diet ; Trans Fatty Acids ; Humans ; Index Medicus ; Abridged Index Medicus
    ISSN: 0959-8138
    E-ISSN: 1468-5833
    E-ISSN: 1756-1833
    Source: Single Journals
    Source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
    Source: © ProQuest LLC All rights reserved〈img src="https://exlibris-pub.s3.amazonaws.com/PQ_Logo.jpg" style="vertical-align:middle;margin-left:7px"〉
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  • 8
    Language: English
    In: The Journal of nutrition, 2020-03-04
    Description: Diet quality is an important risk factor for type 2 diabetes (T2D) and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Little is known about the diet quality of South Asians in the United States, a group with higher rates of T2D and CVD compared with other racial/ethnic groups. This study determined whether diet quality differs between South Asian adults in the Mediators of Atherosclerosis in South Asians Living in America (MASALA) Study and whites, Chinese Americans, African Americans, and Hispanics in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA). Cross-sectional data from 3926 participants free of CVD from MESA visit 5 (2010-2011) and 889 South Asian participants from MASALA visit 1 (2010-2013) were pooled. Diet quality was assessed using the Alternative Healthy Eating Index (AHEI-2010) derived using FFQs. Multivariable linear regression models adjusted for age, sex, and total energy intake were used to compare mean differences in diet quality between the racial/ethnic groups. MESA participants were, on average, 14 y older than MASALA participants. The adjusted mean (95% CI) scores for the AHEI-2010 were 70.2 (69.5, 70.9) among South Asians, 66.2 (66.3, 68.2) among Chinese Americans, 61.1 (60.7, 61.6) among whites, 59.0 (58.4, 59.7) among Hispanics, and 57.5 (56.9, 58.1) among African Americans. The mean AHEI scores among South Asians were 3.1 (1.8, 4.3), 9.2 (8.3, 10.1), 11.2 (10.2, 12.3), and 12.8 (11.8, 13.7) points higher compared with Chinese Americans, whites, Hispanics, and African Americans, respectively. South Asian adults in the United States have a higher diet quality compared with other racial/ethnic groups. This paradoxical finding is not consistent with the observed higher rates of T2D and CVD compared with other groups. This is further evidence of the importance of studying the South Asian population to better understand the causes of chronic disease not explained by diet quality.
    E-ISSN: 1541-6100
    Source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
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  • 9
    Language: English
    In: PloS one, 2015, Vol.10 (10), p.e0141341-e0141341
    Description: Diet guidelines recommend increasing dietary diversity. Yet, metrics for dietary diversity have neither been well-defined nor evaluated for impact on metabolic health. Also, whether diversity has effects independent of diet quality is unknown. We characterized and evaluated associations of diet diversity and quality with abdominal obesity and type II diabetes (T2D) in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis. At baseline (2000-02), diet was assessed among 5,160 Whites, Hispanic, Blacks, and Chinese age 45-84 y and free of T2D, using a validated questionnaire. Three different aspects of diet diversity were characterized including count (number of different food items eaten more than once/week, a broad measure of diversity), evenness (Berry index, a measure of the spread of the diversity), and dissimilarity (Jaccard distance, a measure of the diversity of the attributes of the foods consumed). Diet quality was characterized using aHEI, DASH, and a priori pattern. Count and evenness were weakly positively correlated with diet quality (r with AHEI: 0.20, 0.04), while dissimilarity was moderately inversely correlated (r = -0.34). In multivariate models, neither count nor evenness was associated with change in waist circumference (WC) or incident T2D. Greater food dissimilarity was associated with higher gain in WC (p-trend〈0.01), with 120% higher gain in participants in the highest quintile of dissimilarity scores. Diet diversity was not associated with incident T2D. Also, none of the diversity metrics were associated with change in WC or incident T2D when restricted to only healthier or less healthy foods. Higher diet quality was associated with lower risk of T2D. Our findings provide little evidence for benefits of diet diversity for either abdominal obesity or diabetes. Greater dissimilarity among foods was actually associated with gain in WC. These results do not support the notion that "eating everything in moderation" leads to greater diet quality or better metabolic health.
    Subject(s): Eating ; Ethnic Groups - statistics & numerical data ; Body Weight ; Prospective Studies ; United States ; Humans ; Middle Aged ; Feeding Behavior ; Male ; Risk ; Nutrition Policy ; Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - epidemiology ; Incidence ; Waist Circumference ; Diet ; Obesity, Abdominal - epidemiology ; Aged, 80 and over ; Female ; Surveys and Questionnaires ; Aged ; Obesity ; Complications and side effects ; Care and treatment ; Diet therapy ; Atherosclerosis ; Research ; Diabetes ; Health aspects ; Risk factors ; Index Medicus ; Health care ; Body fat ; Science ; Life assessment ; Epidemiology ; Fruits ; Quality ; Questionnaires ; Food quality ; Public health ; Food ; Chronic illnesses ; Mortality ; Diabetes mellitus ; Health risks ; Metabolism ; Multiculturalism & pluralism ; Studies ; Nutrition research ; Arteriosclerosis ; Asian Americans
    ISSN: 1932-6203
    E-ISSN: 1932-6203
    Source: Academic Search Ultimate
    Source: PubMed Central
    Source: Directory of Open Access Journals
    Source: © ProQuest LLC All rights reserved〈img src="https://exlibris-pub.s3.amazonaws.com/PQ_Logo.jpg" style="vertical-align:middle;margin-left:7px"〉
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  • 10
    Language: English
    In: The Journal of nutrition, 2011, Vol.141 (8), p.1508-1515
    Description: Few studies have examined associations of dietary micronutrients with markers of inflammation and subclinical atherosclerosis. The present study investigated associations of heme iron, nonheme iron, zinc (Zn), magnesium (Mg), β-carotene, vitamin C, and vitamin E with C-reactive protein (CRP), IL-6, total homocysteine (tHcy), fibrinogen, coronary artery calcium, and common and internal carotid artery intima media thickness. Micronutrient intakes and markers of inflammation and subclinical atherosclerosis were studied in 5,181 participants from the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis who were aged 45-84 y and free of diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Models were adjusted for energy intake, demographics, lifestyle characteristics, and BMI. Dietary nonheme iron and Mg intakes were inversely associated with tHcy concentrations (mean tHcy: 9.11, 8.86, 8.74, 8.71, and 8.50 μmol/L, and 9.20, 9.00, 8.65, 8.76, and 8.33 μmol/L across increasing quintiles of nonheme iron and Mg, respectively; P-trend 〈 0.001 for both). However, dietary Zn and heme iron were positively associated with CRP [mean: 1.73, 1.75, 1.78, 1.88, and 1.96 mg/L across increasing quintiles of Zn and 1.72, 1.76, 1.83, 1.86, and 1.94 mg/L across increasing quintiles of heme iron (P-trend = 0.002 and 0.01, respectively). Other tested micronutrient-marker associations were not significant. In conclusion, of the 49 tested associations, only 7 were significant. Although this study does not provide strong support for associations between the micronutrients and markers of inflammation and subclinical atherosclerosis, the results are consistent with dietary guidelines that advocate for a balanced diet that includes a variety of plant foods containing Mg, Zn, and nonheme iron.
    Subject(s): Fundamental and applied biological sciences. Psychology ; Feeding. Feeding behavior ; Biological and medical sciences ; Vertebrates: anatomy and physiology, studies on body, several organs or systems ; Biomarkers - metabolism ; Inflammation - metabolism ; Diet ; Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay ; Humans ; Middle Aged ; Aged, 80 and over ; Female ; Male ; Aged ; Atherosclerosis - metabolism ; Atherosclerosis ; Research ; Index Medicus
    ISSN: 0022-3166
    E-ISSN: 1541-6100
    Source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
    Source: © ProQuest LLC All rights reserved〈img src="https://exlibris-pub.s3.amazonaws.com/PQ_Logo.jpg" style="vertical-align:middle;margin-left:7px"〉
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