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  • 1
    Language: English
    In: 2014
    Subject(s): Climate Change ; Climate Governance ; Adaptation ; Fragmentation ; Complexity ; Unfccc ; Kyoto Protocol ; Environmental Technology ; Technology And Engineering ; Samhällsvetenskap ; Statsvetenskap ; Social Sciences ; Political Science
    Source: SwePub (National Library of Sweden)
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  • 2
    Article
    Article
    2011
    ISSN: 1757-7780 
    Language: English
    In: Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews: Climate Change, March 2011, Vol.2(2), pp.255-270
    Description: The term fragmentation implies that policy domains are marked by a patchwork of public and private institutions that differ in their character, constituencies, spatial scope, subject matter, and objectives. While the degree of fragmentation varies across issue areas and their respective architectures, global climate politics is characterized by an advanced state of institutional diversity. In recent years, scholars have increasingly addressed this emerging phenomenon of international relations. The article finds that the predominant focus of these studies has been on dyadic overlaps, i.e., interlinkages between two institutions, and less on the overarching level of entire architectures and their degree of fragmentation. This goes in particular for research on the global climate change architecture. Many studies have attended to the relationship between the United Nations climate regime and other institutions: multilateral technology partnerships, regimes regulating other environmental domains like ozone or biological diversity, and regimes from non‐environmental issue areas like the world trade regime. However, a cross‐cutting account of these overlaps which addresses the overall implications of institutional fragmentation on climate change is still missing. As possible areas for further research the article identifies: consequences of fragmentation (e.g., a new division of labor or increased inter‐institutional conflict), fragmentation management and conditions of its effectiveness; theory‐driven analyses on the reasons of fragmentation within and across policy domains. 2011 2 255–270 DOI: 10.1002/wcc.104 This article is categorized under:
    Subject(s): Labour ; Biological Diversity ; Policies ; Trade ; International Organizations ; Climate Change ; Climate ; Governance ; Ozone ; Global Climate ; Climate Change ; Architecture ; World Wide Web ; International Trade ; Politics ; Reviews ; Climate Change ; Biological Diversity ; United Nations ; Conflicts ; Technology ; Ozone ; Hydrological Regime ; Climates ; Climate Change ; Institutions ; Technology ; Ozone ; Issues in Sustainable Development ; Variations (551.583) ; Structure, Mechanics and Thermodynamics ; General;
    ISSN: 1757-7780
    E-ISSN: 1757-7799
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  • 3
    Language: German
    In: Ökologisches Wirtschaften, 2011
    Subject(s): Kyoto Protocol ; Unfccc ; Institutions ; Institutional Analysis ; Fragmentation ; Complexity ; Climate Governance ; Global Governance ; Climate Change ; Environmental Governance ; Samhällsvetenskap ; Statsvetenskap ; Social Sciences ; Political Science
    ISSN: 1430-8800
    Source: SwePub (National Library of Sweden)
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  • 4
    Language: English
    In: Environmental Economics and Policy Studies, 2014, Vol.16(2), pp.137-155
    Description: The debate about post-2012 global climate governance has been framed largely by proponents and opponents of the policymaking process established by the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). In light of the proliferation of institutions governing some aspects of climate change, analysts have asked whether a centralized or a polycentric climate governance architecture will be more effective, efficient, equitable, or viable. While these are valid questions, they obscure the fact that global climate governance is already polycentric, or rather: fragmented. This article argues that the more pertinent questions are how to sensibly link the different elements of global climate governance, and what the role of the UNFCCC could be in this regard. We examine these two questions for three aspects of global climate governance: international climate technology initiatives, emerging emissions trading systems, and unilateral trade measures. The article shows that there are strong arguments for coordination in all of these cases, and illustrates the possible role of the UNFCCC. It concludes, however, that possibilities for coordination will eventually be limited by underlying tensions that will plague any future climate governance architecture.
    Subject(s): Clean technologies ; Climate governance ; Emissions trading ; Institutional complexity ; Trade measures
    ISSN: 1432-847X
    E-ISSN: 1867-383X
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  • 5
    In: Global Environmental Politics, 2013, Vol.13(3), pp.1-13
    Description: This article introduces a special issue on the expanding research agenda on institutional fragmentation. The term refers to the growing diversity and challenges to coordination among private and public norms, treaties, and organizations that address a given issue area of international politics. International relations scholars increasingly address this phenomenon, framing it with alternative concepts like regime complexes or polycentricity. A considerable part of the existing debate remains focused on whether a centralized or polycentric governance architecture is preferable. Instead, as this special issue shows, domains of global environmental governance—like climate change, biological diversity, renewable energy, and forestry—are already fragmented. It is time to address new, more pertinent questions and help advance institutionalist research on this phenomenon. We introduce four major research themes for analyzing the fragmentation of different domains of global environmental governance: taking stock, causes, consequences, and responses.
    Subject(s): Introduction
    ISSN: 1526-3800
    E-ISSN: 1536-0091
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  • 6
    Lexicon Article
    Lexicon Article
    2011
    ISSN: 1430-8800 
    In: Ökologisches Wirtschaften, 2011(2), p.18
    ISSN: 1430-8800
    Source: wiso Wirtschaftswissenschaften (GBI-Genios Deutsche Wirtschaftsdatenbank GmbH) 〈img src="http://exlibris-pub.s3.amazonaws.com/wiso_logo.jpg" style="vertical-align:middle;margin-left:7px"〉
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  • 7
    Book chapter
    Book chapter
    2018
    ISBN: 9780198826873 
    Language: English
    In: Legitimacy in Global Governance, Chapter 10
    Description: This chapter explores the consequences of legitimacy in view of the growing institutional complexity of global governance. Global governance institutions do not operate as autonomous entities, but are entwined in dense patchworks of institutions with partly overlapping and competing mandates. The chapter suggests potential causal consequences of the legitimacy of a global governance institution for the institutional complexity of its issue field. Specifically, the analytical framework set out in the chapter theorizes the consequences of legitimacy crises for three dimensions of institutional complexity: the degree of complexity of the institutional architecture, the effectiveness of the institution within this architecture, and the modes of governance used by the institution to navigate this architecture. The chapter illustrates the potential of this framework with examples relating to climate change, energy, and trade governance.
    Subject(s): Politics ; Legitimacy ; Legitimacy Crisis ; Institutional Complexity ; Institutional Fragmentation ; Regime Complex ; Polycentricity ; Orchestration ; Regime Effectiveness ; Climate Change ; Trade
    ISBN: 9780198826873
    Source: Oxford Scholarship Online (Oxford University Press)
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  • 8
    Language: English
    In: Global Governance, 2013, Vol.19(1), pp.105-118
    Description: This article argues that institutional interactions that cut across the domains of trade and environment are embedded in overarching norms that shape their evolution and impact. In making this argument, it analyzes three cases of such interactions within the climate change and biosafety regime complexes: those relating to trade-related climate policies and measures, forest carbon sinks, and trade in genetically modified organisms. The analysis highlights the dominance of liberal environmentalism (a set of global norms promoting economic efficiency and environmental improvements through market-based mechanisms) in shaping institutional interactions within these regime complexes, even as liberal environmentalism is contested by key actors. This, in turn, has implications for effective management of institutional interlinkages within regime complexes in global environmental governance.
    Subject(s): Institutional Theory ; International Organisations ; Biodiversity ; Trade And Environment ; Environmental Institutions ; Climate Change ; Complexity ; Unfccc ; Kyoto Protocol ; Cbd ; Wto ; Wto Law ; Frame Analysis ; Discourse Analysis ; Political Ecology ; Samhällsvetenskap ; Statsvetenskap ; Social Sciences ; Political Science
    ISSN: 1075-2846
    E-ISSN: 19426720
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  • 9
    Language: English
    In: Environmental Politics: Non-State Actors in the New Landscape of International Climate Cooperation, 04 July 2017, Vol.26(4), pp.669-693
    Description: How and why do institutional architectures, and the roles of private institutions therein, differ across separate areas of climate governance? Here, institutional complexity is explained in terms of the problem-structural characteristics of an issue area and the associated demand for, and supply of, private authority. These characteristics can help explain the degree of centrality of intergovernmental institutions, as well as the distribution of governance functions between these and private governance institutions. This framework is applied to three emerging areas of climate governance: reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation (REDD+), short-lived climate pollutants (SLCPs) and climate engineering. Conflicts over means and values, as well as over relatively and absolutely assessed goods, lead to considerable variations in the emergence and roles of private institutions across these three cases.
    Subject(s): Regime Complex ; Institutional Complexity ; Institutional Fragmentation ; Private Authority ; Non-State Actors ; Climate Change ; Climate Engineering ; Geoengineering ; Redd+ ; Short-Lived Climate Pollutants ; Environmental Sciences ; Political Science
    ISSN: 0964-4016
    E-ISSN: 1743-8934
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  • 10
    Language: English
    In: GLOBAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLITICS, 2013
    Description: In 2009, some member countries of the International Energy Agency (IEA) spearheaded the creation of another international organization, the International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA), despite the fact that the IEA had been working on renewables for decades. Why would those states create an overlapping organization, thus advancing the overall degree of fragmentation? Drawing on the work of Mansfield and Moravcsik, this article provides an explanation based on domestic preferences and institutional capture. Viewed through this lens, IRENA was part of an institutional hedging strategy instigated by domestic actors in Germany and allied states to counter the IEA’s alleged normative bias toward the fossil and nuclear energy industries with a wider set of alternative energy options. The findings of the article suggest that, depending on the domestic preferences of a set of states capable to innovate, the transaction costs associated with institutional reform may surmount those of institutional creation.
    Subject(s): Law And Political Science ; Institutions ; Politics ; Rational Design ; Regime Complex
    ISSN: 1526-3800
    E-ISSN: 15360091
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