placeholder
and
and

Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Export
Filter
Language
Year
  • 1
    Language: English
    In: Emergency medicine journal : EMJ, 2022-02-21, Vol.39 (3), p.268-268
    Description: Aims/Objectives/BackgroundMedical Student First Responders (MSFRs) are volunteer Community First Responders, who respond to emergency calls and can provide life-saving interventions before the arrival of an ambulance. There is no data on diurnal trends in ambulance service demand for MSFRs, who do not typically work fixed shift patterns and therefore at present do not know when the most beneficial time of day to volunteer is. Thus, the aim of this service evaluation was to asses when demand for MSFRs is highest in central Oxfordshire and assess if MSFRs were available to respond at those times.Methods/DesignAll MSFRs shifts on a single Dynamic Response Vehicle between 1 October to 31 December 2020 were included. The MSFRs operated exclusively in central Oxfordshire (post codes OX1 – OX4) on behalf of South Central Ambulance Service. MSFR dispatch probability was calculated by comparing total time on duty (for each hour between 9 am – 1 am) with the respective number of incidents attended within that hour, and then plotted as a 3-point moving average against time. No patient data was collected.Results/Conclusions163 ‘on duty’ hours and 58 incidents (44% ‘Category 1’ responses, 88% MSFR first on scene) were included. There were clear diurnal trends in MSFR availability and demand (Abstract 797 figure 1). The probability of MSFR dispatch was highest at 56.3% between 6–7 pm; however, MSFRs were most likely to be available later in the day between 9–10 pm.These findings suggest that the majority of MSFRs shifts occur at times when demand is relatively low. MSFRs are a highly flexible resource and should be encouraged to volunteer earlier in the day, as this would significantly improve coverage during the late afternoon when demand is greatest.Abstract 797 Figure 1
    Subject(s): Community health care ; Emergency medical care ; First aid ; Medical students ; RCEM abstracts ; Trends ; Volunteers
    ISSN: 1472-0205
    E-ISSN: 1472-0213
    Source: Hellenic Academic Libraries Link
    Source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    Language: English
    In: Nature communications, 2017-02-21, Vol.8 (1), p.14115-14115
    Description: For societies with writing systems, hereditary leadership is documented as one of the hallmarks of early political complexity and governance. In contrast, it is unknown whether hereditary succession played a role in the early formation of prehistoric complex societies that lacked writing. Here we use an archaeogenomic approach to identify an elite matriline that persisted between 800 and 1130 CE in Chaco Canyon, the centre of an expansive prehistoric complex society in the Southwestern United States. We show that nine individuals buried in an elite crypt at Pueblo Bonito, the largest structure in the canyon, have identical mitochondrial genomes. Analyses of nuclear genome data from six samples with the highest DNA preservation demonstrate mother-daughter and grandmother-grandson relationships, evidence for a multigenerational matrilineal descent group. Together, these results demonstrate the persistence of an elite matriline in Chaco for ∼330 years.
    Subject(s): Archaeology - methods ; Burial ; DNA, Mitochondrial - chemistry ; DNA, Mitochondrial - genetics ; Female ; Fossils ; Genomics - methods ; Geography ; Haplotypes ; Humans ; Indians, North American - genetics ; Male ; New Mexico ; Pedigree ; Radiometric Dating ; Sequence Analysis, DNA
    ISSN: 2041-1723
    E-ISSN: 2041-1723
    Source: Nature Open Access
    Source: PubMed Central
    Source: DOAJ Directory of Open Access Journals - Not for CDI Discovery
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 3
    Language: English
    In: Nature communications, 2021-02-10, Vol.12 (1), p.923-923
    Description: Replication forks restarted by homologous recombination are error prone and replicate both strands semi-conservatively using Pol δ. Here, we use polymerase usage sequencing to visualize in vivo replication dynamics of HR-restarted forks at an S. pombe replication barrier, RTS1, and model replication by Monte Carlo simulation. We show that HR-restarted forks synthesise both strands with Pol δ for up to 30 kb without maturing to a δ/ε configuration and that Pol α is not used significantly on either strand, suggesting the lagging strand template remains as a gap that is filled in by Pol δ later. We further demonstrate that HR-restarted forks progress uninterrupted through a fork barrier that arrests canonical forks. Finally, by manipulating lagging strand resection during HR-restart by deleting pku70, we show that the leading strand initiates replication at the same position, signifying the stability of the 3' single strand in the context of increased resection.
    Subject(s): Communication and replication ; Deoxyribonucleic acid ; DNA ; DNA Replication ; DNA-Directed DNA Polymerase - genetics ; DNA-Directed DNA Polymerase - metabolism ; Homologous Recombination ; Homology ; Mathematical models ; Monte Carlo simulation ; Replication ; Replication forks ; Schizosaccharomyces - genetics ; Schizosaccharomyces - metabolism ; Schizosaccharomyces pombe Proteins - genetics ; Schizosaccharomyces pombe Proteins - metabolism ; Sequences ; Strands
    ISSN: 2041-1723
    E-ISSN: 2041-1723
    Source: Nature Open Access
    Source: PubMed Central
    Source: DOAJ Directory of Open Access Journals - Not for CDI Discovery
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 4
    Language: English
    In: Nature communications, 2018-07-30, Vol.9 (1), p.2980-16
    Description: Estrogen promotes growth of estrogen receptor-positive (ER+) breast tumors. However, epidemiological studies examining the prognostic characteristics of breast cancer in postmenopausal women receiving hormone replacement therapy reveal a significant decrease in tumor dissemination, suggesting that estrogen has potential protective effects against cancer cell invasion. Here, we show that estrogen suppresses invasion of ER+ breast cancer cells by increasing transcription of the Ena/VASP protein, EVL, which promotes the generation of suppressive cortical actin bundles that inhibit motility dynamics, and is crucial for the ER-mediated suppression of invasion in vitro and in vivo. Interestingly, despite its benefits in suppressing tumor growth, anti-estrogenic endocrine therapy decreases EVL expression and increases local invasion in patients. Our results highlight the dichotomous effects of estrogen on tumor progression and suggest that, in contrast to its established role in promoting growth of ER+ tumors, estrogen has a significant role in suppressing invasion through actin cytoskeletal remodeling.
    Subject(s): Actin ; Actin Cytoskeleton - chemistry ; Actins - chemistry ; Animals ; Breast cancer ; Breast Neoplasms - pathology ; Caco-2 Cells ; Cancer ; Cell Line, Tumor ; Cell Movement - drug effects ; Cell Proliferation ; Cortex ; Cytoskeleton ; Dogs ; Epidemiology ; Estradiol - chemistry ; Estrogen Receptor alpha - chemistry ; Estrogen receptors ; Estrogens ; Estrogens - chemistry ; Female ; Gene Expression Profiling ; HEK293 Cells ; Hormone replacement therapy ; Human health and pathology ; Humans ; Life Sciences ; Lymph Nodes - pathology ; Madin Darby Canine Kidney Cells ; MCF-7 Cells ; Mice ; Mice, Inbred NOD ; Neoplasm Invasiveness ; Neoplasm Metastasis ; Post-menopause ; Proteins ; Therapy ; Transcription ; Transcription, Genetic ; Tumors ; Xenoestrogens
    ISSN: 2041-1723
    E-ISSN: 2041-1723
    Source: Nature Open Access
    Source: PubMed Central
    Source: DOAJ Directory of Open Access Journals - Not for CDI Discovery
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 5
    Language: English
    In: The Journal of cell biology, 2019-12-01, Vol.218 (12), p.4215-4235
    Description: The mechanical properties of a cell's microenvironment influence many aspects of cellular behavior, including cell migration. Durotaxis, the migration toward increasing matrix stiffness, has been implicated in processes ranging from development to cancer. During durotaxis, mechanical stimulation by matrix rigidity leads to directed migration. Studies suggest that cells sense mechanical stimuli, or mechanosense, through the acto-myosin cytoskeleton at focal adhesions (FAs); however, FA actin cytoskeletal remodeling and its role in mechanosensing are not fully understood. Here, we show that the Ena/VASP family member, EnaNASP-like (EVL), polymerizes actin at FAs, which promotes cell-matrix adhesion and mechanosensing. Importantly, we show that EVL regulates mechanically directed motility, and that suppression of EVL expression impedes 3D durotactic invasion. We propose a model in which EVL-mediated actin polymerization at FAs promotes mechanosensing and durotaxis by maturing, and thus reinforcing, FAs. These findings establish dynamic FA actin polymerization as a central aspect of mechanosensing and identify EVL as a crucial regulator of this process.
    Subject(s): Actin ; Cell adhesion & migration ; Cell Biology ; Cell migration ; Cytoskeleton ; Life Sciences & Biomedicine ; Mechanical properties ; Mechanical stimuli ; Myosin ; Polymerization ; Rigidity ; Science & Technology ; Stiffness ; Three dimensional models
    ISSN: 0021-9525
    E-ISSN: 1540-8140
    Source: Web of Science - Science Citation Index Expanded - 2019〈img src="http://exlibris-pub.s3.amazonaws.com/fromwos-v2.jpg" /〉
    Source: Rockefeller University Press
    Source: PubMed Central
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 6
    Language: English
    In: Nature communications, 2021-06-22, Vol.12 (1), p.3856-3856
    Description: AbstractThe MRN complex (MRX in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, made of Mre11, Rad50 and Nbs1/Xrs2) initiates double-stranded DNA break repair and activates the Tel1/ATM kinase in the DNA damage response. Telomeres counter both outcomes at chromosome ends, partly by keeping MRN-ATM in check. We show that MRX is disabled by telomeric protein Rif2 through an N-terminal motif (MIN, MRN/X-inhibitory motif). MIN executes suppression of Tel1, DNA end-resection and non-homologous end joining by binding the Rad50 N-terminal region. Our data suggest that MIN promotes a transition within MRX that is not conductive for endonuclease activity, DNA-end tethering or Tel1 kinase activation, highlighting an Achilles’ heel in MRN, which we propose is also exploited by the RIF2 paralog ORC4 (Origin Recognition Complex 4) in Kluyveromyces lactis and the Schizosaccharomyces pombe telomeric factor Taz1, which is evolutionarily unrelated to Orc4/Rif2. This raises the possibility that analogous mechanisms might be deployed in other eukaryotes as well.
    Subject(s): Chromosomes ; Damage ; Deoxyribonucleic acid ; DNA ; DNA damage ; DNA repair ; Endonuclease ; Eukaryotes ; Homology ; Kinases ; MRE11 protein ; N-Terminus ; Non-homologous end joining ; Origin recognition complex ; Proteins ; Repair ; Telomeres ; Tethering ; Yeast ; Yeasts
    ISSN: 2041-1723
    E-ISSN: 2041-1723
    Source: Nature Open Access
    Source: PubMed Central
    Source: DOAJ Directory of Open Access Journals - Not for CDI Discovery
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 7
    Language: English
    In: Australasian journal on ageing, 2021-12, Vol.40 (4), p.461-461
    Description: Byline: Adam J. R. Watson
    Subject(s): Electric alarms ; Emergency Responders ; Humans ; United Kingdom
    ISSN: 1440-6381
    E-ISSN: 1741-6612
    Source: Hellenic Academic Libraries Link
    Source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 8
    Language: English
    In: PloS one, 2018, Vol.13 (6), p.e0198290-e0198290
    Description: Questions about how archaeological populations obtained basic food supplies are often difficult to answer. The application of specialist techniques from non-archaeological fields typically expands our knowledge base, but can be detrimental to cultural interpretations if employed incorrectly, resulting in problematic datasets and erroneous conclusions not easily caught by the recipient archaeological community. One area where this problem has failed to find resolution is Chaco Canyon, New Mexico, the center of one of the New World's most vibrant ancient civilizations. Discussions of agricultural feasibility and its impact on local population levels at Chaco Canyon have been heavily influenced by studies of soil salinity. A number of researchers have argued that salinized soils severely limited local agricultural production, instead suggesting food was imported from distant sources, specifically the Chuska Mountains. A careful reassessment of existing salinity data as measured by electrical conductivity reveals critical errors in data conversion and presentation that have misrepresented the character of the area's soil and its potential impact on crops. We combine all available electrical conductivity data, including our own, and apply multiple established conversion methods in order to estimate soil salinity values and evaluate their relationship to agricultural productivity potential. Our results show that Chacoan soils display the same salinity ranges and spatial variability as soils in other documented, productive fields in semi-arid areas. Additionally, the proposed large-scale importation of food from the Chuska Mountains region has serious social implications that have not been thoroughly explored. We consider these factors and conclude that the high cost and extreme inflexibility of such a system, in combination with material evidence for local agriculture within Chaco Canyon, make this scenario highly unlikely. Both the soil salinity and archaeological data suggest that there is no justification for precluding the practice of local agriculture within Chaco Canyon.
    Subject(s): Agricultural economics ; Agricultural practices ; Agricultural production ; Agricultural productivity ; Agriculture ; Agriculture - history ; Analysis ; Anthropology ; Archaeology ; Archives & records ; Arid regions ; Biology and Life Sciences ; Civilization ; Civilization, Ancient ; Conductivity ; Crops, Agricultural - growth & development ; Data conversion ; Data processing ; Ecology and Environmental Sciences ; Editors ; Electrical conductivity ; Electrical resistivity ; Environmental aspects ; Feasibility studies ; Food ; Food production ; Food supply ; Geology ; History ; History, Ancient ; Houses ; Importation ; Interdisciplinary aspects ; Knowledge bases (artificial intelligence) ; Mountains ; Museums ; National parks ; New Mexico ; Physical Sciences ; Population levels ; Research and Analysis Methods ; Salinity ; Salinity data ; Salinity effects ; Social Sciences ; Society ; Soil - chemistry ; Soil analysis ; Soil salinity ; Soil sciences ; Soils, Salts in ; Spatial variability
    ISSN: 1932-6203
    E-ISSN: 1932-6203
    Source: Academic Search Ultimate
    Source: PubMed Central
    Source: DOAJ Directory of Open Access Journals - Not for CDI Discovery
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 9
    Language: English
    In: Cell reports (Cambridge), 2021-06-29, Vol.35 (13), p.109293-109293
    Description: While the immediate and transitory response of breast cancer cells to pathological stiffness in their native microenvironment has been well explored, it remains unclear how stiffness-induced phenotypes are maintained over time after cancer cell dissemination in vivo. Here, we show that fibrotic-like matrix stiffness promotes distinct metastatic phenotypes in cancer cells, which are preserved after transition to softer microenvironments, such as bone marrow. Using differential gene expression analysis of stiffness-responsive breast cancer cells, we establish a multigenic score of mechanical conditioning (MeCo) and find that it is associated with bone metastasis in patients with breast cancer. The maintenance of mechanical conditioning is regulated by RUNX2, an osteogenic transcription factor, established driver of bone metastasis, and mitotic bookmarker that preserves chromatin accessibility at target gene loci. Using genetic and functional approaches, we demonstrate that mechanical conditioning maintenance can be simulated, repressed, or extended, with corresponding changes in bone metastatic potential. [Display omitted] •Mechanical conditioning is associated with distinct cytoskeletal features of cells•Mechanical conditioning is reflected in a temporal profile of chromatin accessibility•RUNX2 promotes bone metastasis via maintenance of mechanical conditioning•Breast tumor mechanical conditioning is associated with bone metastasis in patients Watson et al. demonstrate that mechanical conditioning by stiff microenvironments in breast tumors is maintained in cancer cells after dissemination to softer microenvironments, including bone marrow. They show that mechanical conditioning promotes invasion and osteolysis and establish a mechanical conditioning (MeCo) score, associated with bone metastasis in patients.
    Subject(s): ATACseq ; Biomechanical Phenomena ; biomechanics ; Bone Marrow - pathology ; bone metastasis ; Bone Neoplasms - secondary ; breast cancer ; Breast Neoplasms - pathology ; Breast Neoplasms - physiopathology ; Cell Line, Tumor ; Cell Nucleus - metabolism ; Core Binding Factor Alpha 1 Subunit - metabolism ; Extracellular Matrix - metabolism ; Female ; Humans ; matrix stiffness ; mechanical memory ; Mechanotransduction, Cellular ; Neoplasm Invasiveness ; osteolysis ; phenotypic plasticity ; RUNX2 ; Tumor Microenvironment
    ISSN: 2211-1247
    E-ISSN: 2211-1247
    Source: DOAJ Directory of Open Access Journals - Not for CDI Discovery
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 10
    Language: English
    In: The Journal of applied ecology, 2018-11, Vol.55 (6), p.2663-2672
    Description: Recreational hunting is widespread and can benefit nature conservation when well‐practised, monitored, and regulated. Management for recreational red grouse Lagopus lagopus scotica shooting on upland heathland in the UK causes conservation conflict because the intensive habitat, predator, and disease management needed to maintain high‐grouse densities for “driven” shooting has detrimental environmental impacts, notably for raptor populations. Sustainable management of mountain hares Lepus timidus scoticus, a game species in the same landscapes, poses a challenge. Control of transmission to grouse of a viral disease, louping‐ill, for which mountain hares are a host, has become an additional motivation to kill mountain hares since research during 1993–2001 suggested that culls might reduce infection rates in grouse. We analysed population trends of mountain hares from spring counts on moorland managed for grouse shooting and on contiguous alpine land. On moorland sites, a long‐term decline (4.6% per annum) from 1954 to 1999 increased to 30.7% per annum from then until 2017, with a density index falling to 〈1% of initial levels after 2008. Before 1999, declines were associated with conifer planting and were least severe where heather burning characteristic of grouse management was present. Grouse moors had the highest rate of decline after 1999. On alpine sites, the density index increased by 2.0% per annum from 1954 to 2007, then declined by 12.3% per annum but remained within the previous range of variation. Despite lack of evidence that it increases grouse numbers, reduction of louping‐ill transmission to grouse became a more frequent justification for mountain hare culls at a time consistent with it causing these recent, rapid mountain hare declines on grouse moors. Synthesis and applications. Long‐term field counts suggest that intensification of game bird management has resulted in severe, recent declines in mountain hare numbers, exacerbating longer term declines associated with land‐use change. Management practices founded on misinterpretation of earlier research are the probable cause. Regulation of hare culling would provide a framework for formal tests of whether culls affect grouse surpluses. It would also provide an opportunity to examine mountain hare populations' resilience to culls of varying size and seasonal timing. Long‐term field counts suggest that intensification of game bird management has resulted in severe, recent declines in mountain hare numbers, exacerbating longer term declines associated with land‐use change. Management practices founded on misinterpretation of earlier research are the probable cause. Regulation of hare culling would provide a framework for formal tests of whether culls affect grouse surpluses. It would also provide an opportunity to examine mountain hare populations' resilience to culls of varying size and seasonal timing.
    Subject(s): Alpine environments ; Birds ; Burning ; Conservation ; Culling ; Density ; disease ; Disease control ; Disease management ; Environmental impact ; Environmental management ; favourable conservation status ; game bird ; Grouse ; Hunting ; Landscape ; long‐term study ; Moorland ; Motivation ; Nature conservation ; Populations ; predator control ; red grouse ; Shooting ; Virus diseases ; Wildlife conservation
    ISSN: 0021-8901
    E-ISSN: 1365-2664
    Source: Elektronische Zeitschriftenbibliothek - Frei zugängliche E-Journals
    Source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. More information can be found here...