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  • 1
    Language: German
    In: Praxis (Bern. 1994), 2010-10-20, Vol.99 (21), p.1267-1268
    Subject(s): Diagnosis, Differential ; Nursing Homes ; Body Temperature Regulation - physiology ; Fever of Unknown Origin - etiology ; Humans ; Reference Values ; Aged ; Frail Elderly ; Homes for the Aged ; Fever of Unknown Origin - physiopathology ; Practice Guidelines as Topic ; Index Medicus
    ISSN: 1661-8157
    Source: Hogrefe eContent
    Source: Academic Search Ultimate
    Source: © ProQuest LLC All rights reserved〈img src="https://exlibris-pub.s3.amazonaws.com/PQ_Logo.jpg" style="vertical-align:middle;margin-left:7px"〉
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  • 2
    Language: English
    In: Clinical chemistry and laboratory medicine, 1998, Vol.36 (4), p.235-240
    Description: Conventional laboratory investigations of haemostasis like prothrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time are not useful in predicting and managing intra-operative bleeding complications. In order to establish a possible "perioperative reference range" for thrombin generation prothrombin fragment F1+2 (F1+2) and fibrin degradation (D-dimer) markers, we measured F1+2 and D-dimer concentrations before surgery (but after induction of anaesthesia), 30 minutes into surgery, 10 minutes after the event expected to induce the maximal activation of the haemostatic systems, 90 minutes after surgery and on postoperative days 1 and 2 in 226 consecutive patients. Samples were collected from arterial lines. Twenty patients developed a clinically defined, intraoperative disorder of haemostasis, 206 did not. Patients with an intraoperative disorder of haemostasis had significantly higher preoperative F1+2 and D-dimer concentrations. Preoperative values for F1+2 and D-dimer concentrations above the 75th percentile of patients without an intraoperative disorder of haemostasis indicated a 2.70 to 2.88 fold risk of developing an intraoperative disorder of haemostasis (odds ratios were 3.04, 3.12 and 3.29 for D-dimer, ELISA, F1+2, and D-dimer latex tests, respectively with 95% confidence intervals from 1.20 to 8.46) with negative predictive values of 94%, but positive predictive values of only 16% to 26%. These data suggest that preoperative determination of molecular markers might be helpful in identifying a group of patients at high risk for intraoperative disorder of haemostasis by exclusion of low risk patients. Validation of such an approach requires a prospective trial.
    Subject(s): Blood coagulation ; Biological and medical sciences ; Investigative techniques, diagnostic techniques (general aspects) ; Medical sciences ; Blood Loss, Surgical - prevention & control ; Intraoperative Complications - blood ; Blood Coagulation Disorders - prevention & control ; Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products - metabolism ; Blood Coagulation Disorders - etiology ; Humans ; Middle Aged ; Risk Factors ; Intraoperative Complications - prevention & control ; Male ; Biomarkers - blood ; Hemostasis ; Intraoperative Complications - etiology ; Blood Coagulation ; Peptide Fragments - blood ; Aged, 80 and over ; Blood Coagulation Disorders - blood ; Adult ; Female ; Aged ; Prothrombin - metabolism ; Index Medicus
    ISSN: 1434-6621
    E-ISSN: 1437-4331
    Source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
    Source: © ProQuest LLC All rights reserved〈img src="https://exlibris-pub.s3.amazonaws.com/PQ_Logo.jpg" style="vertical-align:middle;margin-left:7px"〉
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  • 3
    Language: English
    In: Nature biotechnology, 2018-12-17, Vol.37 (1), p.73-83
    Description: Understanding complex biological systems requires the system-wide characterization of both molecular and cellular features. Existing methods for spatial mapping of biomolecules in intact tissues suffer from information loss caused by degradation and tissue damage. We report a tissue transformation strategy named stabilization under harsh conditions via intramolecular epoxide linkages to prevent degradation (SHIELD), which uses a flexible polyepoxide to form controlled intra- and intermolecular cross-link with biomolecules. SHIELD preserves protein fluorescence and antigenicity, transcripts and tissue architecture under a wide range of harsh conditions. We applied SHIELD to interrogate system-level wiring, synaptic architecture, and molecular features of virally labeled neurons and their targets in mouse at single-cell resolution. We also demonstrated rapid three-dimensional phenotyping of core needle biopsies and human brain cells. SHIELD enables rapid, multiscale, integrated molecular phenotyping of both animal and clinical tissues.
    Subject(s): Usage ; Phenotype ; Epoxy compounds ; Fluorescence ; Biomolecules ; Chemical properties ; Research ; Tissues
    ISSN: 1087-0156
    E-ISSN: 1546-1696
    Source: Single Journals
    Source: Nature Journals Online
    Source: © ProQuest LLC All rights reserved〈img src="https://exlibris-pub.s3.amazonaws.com/PQ_Logo.jpg" style="vertical-align:middle;margin-left:7px"〉
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  • 4
    Language: English
    In: Archives of disease in childhood, 2012-10, Vol.97 (Suppl 2), p.A303-A303
    Description: Background and Aim Longitudinal studies show that premature birth increases infants’ risk for mental and motor development deficits. Our aim was to investigate the influence of prematurity on cerebral tissue volumes at term obtained with a novel fully automatic segmentation method. Methods 62 preterm infants (GA 27.7±1.3wks) and 15 term-born infants (GA 40±1.1wks) were scanned at term-equivalent age (GA 40.5±1.5wks). T1 and T2 MR images were segmented with a novel atlas-free automatic method based on morphological constraints. Each brain was separated into the two hemispheres, cortical and subcortical gray matter, myelinated and unmyelinated white matter, brainstem, cerebellum and CSF. Results Linear regression models were fitted to study the dependency of tissue volumes on GA at birth, GA at scan and intracranial volume. Models show significant dependence on GA at birth for cortical gray matter (Beta=0.270, P=0.000, R2=0.818), unmyelinated white matter (Beta=0.196, P=0.03, R2=0.575), cerebellum (Beta=0.348, P=0.000, R2=0.648) and CSF (Beta= –0.329, P=0.000, R2=0.708). Wilcoxon Signed Ranks tests showed significantly larger unmyelinated white matter volumes in the right hemisphere compared to the left hemisphere (Z= –4.826, P=0.000), and significantly larger total volumes of the right hemisphere compared to the left hemisphere (Z= –3.486, P=0.000). Conclusions Reliable volume assessments were derived from the new automatic segmentation. CSF volumes at term increased with lower GA at birth, while cortical gray matter, unmyelinated white matter and cerebellum volumes at term increased with GA at birth, suggesting impaired growth of these tissues associated with prematurity. Cerebral asymmetry was present at term for both preterm and term infants.
    ISSN: 0003-9888
    E-ISSN: 1468-2044
    Source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
    Source: © ProQuest LLC All rights reserved〈img src="https://exlibris-pub.s3.amazonaws.com/PQ_Logo.jpg" style="vertical-align:middle;margin-left:7px"〉
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  • 5
    Language: English
    In: Journal of cell science, 2011-11-01, Vol.124 (21), p.3591-3602
    ISSN: 0021-9533
    E-ISSN: 1477-9137
    Source: HighWire Press (Free Journals)
    Source: Company of Biologists
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  • 6
    Language: English
    Description: The VirB/D4 type IV secretion system (T4SS) of the bacterial pathogen Bartonella henselae (Bhe) translocates seven effector proteins (BepA–BepG) into human cells that subvert host cellular functions. Two redundant pathways dependent on BepG or the combination of BepC and BepF trigger the formation of a bacterial uptake structure termed the invasome. Invasome formation is a multi-step process consisting of bacterial adherence, effector translocation, aggregation of bacteria on the cell surface and engulfment, and eventually, complete internalization of the bacterial aggregate occurs in an F-actin-dependent manner. In the present study, we show that Bhe-triggered invasome formation depends on integrin-β1-mediated signaling cascades that enable assembly of the F-actin invasome structure. We demonstrate that Bhe interacts with integrin β1 in a fibronectin- and VirB/D4 T4SS independent manner and that activated integrin β1 is essential for both effector translocation and the actin rearrangements leading to invasome formation. Furthermore, we show that talin1, but not talin2, is required for inside-out activation of integrin β1 during invasome formation. Finally, integrin β1-mediated outside-in signaling by FAK, Src, paxillin and vinculin is necessary for invasome formation. This is the first example of a bacterial entry process that fully exploits the bi-directional signaling capacity of integrin receptors in a talin1- specific manner.
    Subject(s): biology ; SystemsX.ch ; Life sciences ; InfectX ; Research, Technology and Development Projects
    ISSN: 0021-9533
    E-ISSN: 1477-9137
    Source: ZORA
    Source: HighWire Press (Free Journals)
    Source: Company of Biologists
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  • 7
    Language: English
    In: BMC pediatrics, 2015-07-09, Vol.15 (1), p.73-73
    Description: Neonates with hypoxic ischaemic encephalopathy (HIE) are routinely treated with therapeutic hypothermia (TH) for 72 h in order to improve neurological outcome. Subcutaneous fat necrosis (SCFN) is an adverse event occurring in neonates with HIE. We analyzed risk factors for SCFN regarding demographic factors, cooling methods and deviation from target temperature range during hypothermia therapy. Data of all neonates registered in the National Asphyxia and Cooling Register in Switzerland between 2011 and 2013 were analyzed. 2.8% of all cooled neonates with HIE developed SCFN. Perinatal and neonatal characteristics did not differ between neonates with and without SCFN. Applied cooling methods did not correlate with the occurrence of SCFN. In neonates with SCFN 83.3% of all noted temperatures were within the target temperature range versus 77.5% in neonates without SCFN. Neonates with SCFN showed 3.6% of all measured temperatures below target temperature range compared to 12.7% in neonates without SCFN. Subcutaneous fat necrosis in the neonate with HIE undergoing TH is a potential adverse event that seems to occur independently from the whole-body cooling method applied and proportion of temperature measurements outside target temperature range. In this cohort, moderate overcooling associated with moderate hypothermia (33.0-34.0 °C) does not seem to be an independent risk factor for SCFN. There is no correlation between the severity of HIE and incidence of SCFN.
    Subject(s): Hypothermia, Induced - adverse effects ; Humans ; Hypothermia, Induced - methods ; Risk Factors ; Fat Necrosis - etiology ; Female ; Hypoxia-Ischemia, Brain - therapy ; Male ; Registries ; Switzerland ; Infant, Newborn ; Hypoxia-Ischemia, Brain - complications ; Infants (Newborn) ; Health aspects ; Analysis ; Index Medicus ; Hypothermia therapy ; Hypoxic ischaemic encephalopathy ; Register ; Subcutaneous fat necrosis
    ISSN: 1471-2431
    E-ISSN: 1471-2431
    Source: BioMedCentral Open Access
    Source: PubMed Central
    Source: Directory of Open Access Journals
    Source: © ProQuest LLC All rights reserved〈img src="https://exlibris-pub.s3.amazonaws.com/PQ_Logo.jpg" style="vertical-align:middle;margin-left:7px"〉
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  • 8
    Language: English
    Description: BACKGROUND Therapeutic hypothermia following hypoxic ischaemic encephalopathy in term infants was introduced into Switzerland in 2005. Initial documentation of perinatal and resuscitation details was poor and neuromonitoring insufficient. In 2011, a National Asphyxia and Cooling Register was introduced. AIMS To compare management of cooled infants before and after introduction of the register concerning documentation, neuromonitoring, cooling methods and evaluation of temperature variability between cooling methods. STUDY DESIGN Data of cooled infants before the register was in place (first time period: 2005-2010) and afterwards (second time period: 2011-2012) was collected with a case report form. RESULTS 150 infants were cooled during the first time period and 97 during the second time period. Most infants were cooled passively or passively with gel packs during both time periods (82% in 2005-2010 vs 70% in 2011-2012), however more infants were cooled actively during the second time period (18% versus 30%). Overall there was a significant reduction in temperature variability (p 〈 0.001) comparing the two time periods. A significantly higher proportion of temperature measurements within target temperature range (72% versus 77%, p 〈 0.001), fewer temperature measurements above (24% versus 7%, p 〈 0.001) and more temperatures below target range (4% versus 16%, p 〈 0.001) were recorded during the second time period. Neuromonitoring improved after introduction of the cooling register. CONCLUSION Management of infants with HIE improved since introducing the register. Temperature variability was reduced, more temperature measurements in the target range and fewer temperature measurements above target range were observed. Neuromonitoring has improved, however imaging should be performed more often.
    Subject(s): Medicine & health ; Clinic for Neonatology ; Clinic and Policlinic for Internal Medicine ; Medical Clinic
    ISSN: 0378-3782
    E-ISSN: 1872-6232
    Source: ZORA
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  • 9
    Language: English
    In: Transplant international, 1999-07, Vol.12 (4), p.244-249
    Description: Hypomagnesemia is common after kidney transplantation. Until recently, only the determination of total plasma magnesium was possible, whereas the assessment of ionized magnesium has since become practicable. One hundred and nine renal transplant patients on cyclosporine with allografts functioning stably for more than 6 months and plasma creatinine levels of less than 200 umol/1 entered the study. Total and ionized circulating magnesium were assessed among these 109 patients, as well as among 15 renal transplant patients not on cyclosporine and 21 healthy volunteers. Cyclosporine patients showed significantly lower total and ionized circulating magnesium values than the two control groups. Plasma total and ionized magnesium levels were also significantly lower among cyclosporine patients treated concurrently with insulin or oral hypoglycemic agents than among those who were not. No correlation was noted between time after transplantation and plasma magnesium with respect to patients on cyclosporine. In conclusion, the study demonstrates that a large subset of renal transplant patients treated with cyclosporine have permanent deficiencies of ionized and total magnesium. The tendency towards hypomagnesemia is also more pronounced among patients with diabetes mellitus.
    Subject(s): cyclosporine ; cyclosporine Magnesium ; magnesium ; kidney transplantation Cyclosporine ; Kidney transplantation ; Biological and medical sciences ; Medical sciences ; Surgery (general aspects). Transplantations, organ and tissue grafts. Graft diseases ; Surgery of the urinary system ; Hypoglycemic Agents - therapeutic use ; Azathioprine - therapeutic use ; Follow-Up Studies ; Humans ; Immunosuppressive Agents - therapeutic use ; Middle Aged ; Male ; Reference Values ; Cardiovascular Agents - therapeutic use ; Cyclosporine - therapeutic use ; Kidney Transplantation - physiology ; Mycophenolic Acid - analogs & derivatives ; Mycophenolic Acid - therapeutic use ; Adolescent ; Adult ; Diuretics - therapeutic use ; Female ; Aged ; Kidney Transplantation - immunology ; Child ; Magnesium - blood ; Prednisone - therapeutic use ; Index Medicus
    ISSN: 0934-0874
    E-ISSN: 1432-2277
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives (DFG Nationallizenzen)
    Source: Wiley Online Library All Backfiles
    Source: © ProQuest LLC All rights reserved〈img src="https://exlibris-pub.s3.amazonaws.com/PQ_Logo.jpg" style="vertical-align:middle;margin-left:7px"〉
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  • 10
    Language: English
    In: Swiss medical weekly, 2011, Vol.141, p.w13280-w13280
    Description: Perinatal care of pregnant women at high risk for preterm delivery and of preterm infants born at the limit of viability (22-26 completed weeks of gestation) requires a multidisciplinary approach by an experienced perinatal team. Limited precision in the determination of both gestational age and foetal weight, as well as biological variability may significantly affect the course of action chosen in individual cases. The decisions that must be taken with the pregnant women and on behalf of the preterm infant in this context are complex and have far-reaching consequences. When counselling pregnant women and their partners, neonatologists and obstetricians should provide them with comprehensive information in a sensitive and supportive way to build a basis of trust. The decisions are developed in a continuing dialogue between all parties involved (physicians, midwives, nursing staff and parents) with the principal aim to find solutions that are in the infant's and pregnant woman's best interest. Knowledge of current gestational age-specific mortality and morbidity rates and how they are modified by prenatally known prognostic factors (estimated foetal weight, sex, exposure or nonexposure to antenatal corticosteroids, single or multiple births) as well as the application of accepted ethical principles form the basis for responsible decision-making. Communication between all parties involved plays a central role. The members of the interdisciplinary working group suggest that the care of preterm infants with a gestational age between 22 0/7 and 23 6/7 weeks should generally be limited to palliative care. Obstetric interventions for foetal indications such as Caesarean section delivery are usually not indicated. In selected cases, for example, after 23 weeks of pregnancy have been completed and several of the above mentioned prenatally known prognostic factors are favourable or well informed parents insist on the initiation of life-sustaining therapies, active obstetric interventions for foetal indications and provisional intensive care of the neonate may be reasonable. In preterm infants with a gestational age between 24 0/7 and 24 6/7 weeks, it can be difficult to determine whether the burden of obstetric interventions and neonatal intensive care is justified given the limited chances of success of such a therapy. In such cases, the individual constellation of prenatally known factors which impact on prognosis can be helpful in the decision making process with the parents. In preterm infants with a gestational age between 25 0/7 and 25 6/7 weeks, foetal surveillance, obstetric interventions for foetal indications and neonatal intensive care measures are generally indicated. However, if several prenatally known prognostic factors are unfavourable and the parents agree, primary non-intervention and neonatal palliative care can be considered. All pregnant women with threatening preterm delivery or premature rupture of membranes at the limit of viability must be transferred to a perinatal centre with a level III neonatal intensive care unit no later than 23 0/7 weeks of gestation, unless emergency delivery is indicated. An experienced neonatology team should be involved in all deliveries that take place after 23 0/7 weeks of gestation to help to decide together with the parents if the initiation of intensive care measures appears to be appropriate or if preference should be given to palliative care (i.e., primary non-intervention). In doubtful situations, it can be reasonable to initiate intensive care and to admit the preterm infant to a neonatal intensive care unit (i.e., provisional intensive care). The infant's clinical evolution and additional discussions with the parents will help to clarify whether the life-sustaining therapies should be continued or withdrawn. Life support is continued as long as there is reasonable hope for survival and the infant's burden of intensive care is acceptable. If, on the other hand, the health care team and the parents have to recognise that in the light of a very poor prognosis the burden of the currently used therapies has become disproportionate, intensive care measures are no longer justified and other aspects of care (e.g., relief of pain and suffering) are the new priorities (i.e., redirection of care). If a decision is made to withhold or withdraw life-sustaining therapies, the health care team should focus on comfort care for the dying infant and support for the parents.
    Subject(s): Guidelines as Topic ; Premature Birth ; Fetal Development - drug effects ; Perinatal Care - ethics ; Adrenal Cortex Hormones ; Humans ; Male ; Palliative Care ; Gestational Age ; Switzerland ; Quality Assurance, Health Care ; Pregnancy ; Delivery, Obstetric ; Infant, Premature ; Female ; Resuscitation Orders ; Infant, Newborn ; Index Medicus
    E-ISSN: 1424-3997
    Source: Directory of Open Access Journals
    Source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
    Source: © ProQuest LLC All rights reserved〈img src="https://exlibris-pub.s3.amazonaws.com/PQ_Logo.jpg" style="vertical-align:middle;margin-left:7px"〉
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