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  • 1
    Language: English
    In: Institute of Southeast Asian Studies, 2011, 364 pp
    Description: Understanding the nexus between employment, living standards and poverty is a major challenge in Indonesia. Trends in poverty are heavily dependent on labour market opportunities and social spending in education and health. The question is how to create opportunities and spend money wisely -- a subject of intense debate in Indonesia. The government has brought a renewed focus to poverty reduction since the end of the Asian financial crisis, especially under the current president, Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono. This study aims to show how Indonesia is travelling with regard to employment, social policy and poverty. It identifies promising new directions for strategies to alleviate poverty, some of which are already showing results.
    Subject(s): Poverty ; Indonesia ; Employment ; Cost and Standard of Living ; Presidents ; Asians ; Education ; Markets ; Finance ; Yudhoyono, Susilo Bambang ; Social Policy ; Economic Conditions ; Money ; Book ; Social Conditions and Policy - Social Conditions and Problems ; Economic Conditions and Policy - Economic Conditions ; Labor Conditions and Policy - Employment and Labor Supply ; Government - Public Officials ; Population Groups, Population Policy, and Demographics - National, Ethnic, and Minority Groups ; Education and Education Policy - Education ; Business and Service Sector - Markets, Marketing, and Merchandising ; Business and Service Sector - Business Finance ; Social Conditions and Policy - Social Policy and Social Development ; Banking and Public and Private Finance - Money, Currency, and Financial Instruments ; Economic Conditions and Policy - Property and Wealth
    ISBN: 9789814345118
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  • 2
    Language: English
    In: Journal of Political Economy, 01 April 2018, Vol.126(2), pp.451-491
    Description: Redistribution programs in developing countries often “leak” because local officials do not implement programs as the central government intends. We study one approach to reducing leakage. In an experiment in over 550 villages, we test whether mailing cards with program information to targeted beneficiaries increases the subsidy they receive from a subsidized rice program. On net, beneficiaries received 26 percent more subsidy in card villages. Ineligible households received no less, so this represents substantially lower leakage.
    Subject(s): Indonesia ; Studies ; Identification Documents ; Subsidies ; Developing Countries–Ldcs ; Food ; Beneficiaries ; Empowerment ; Rice ; Developing Countries–Ldcs ; Central Government ; Households ; Redistribution ; Villages;
    ISSN: 00223808
    E-ISSN: 1537534X
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  • 3
    Article
    Article
    2011
    ISSN: 0007-4918 
    Language: English
    In: Bulletin of Indonesian Economic Studies, 01 August 2011, Vol.47(2), pp.155-181
    Description: Considerable media criticism has been directed recently at parliamentarians' enthusiasm for costly overseas 'working visits' with little obvious benefit to the nation, and at their plans for a new parliamentary building. The criticism may not be fully justified, especially in relation to the latter, but is symptomatic of a high level of cynicism towards the parliament. Many of its members have been embroiled in corruption, and it is performing poorly in terms of the number of bills passed. Indonesia experienced two bomb explosions in the period covered here, while at least eight other bombs were defused. In contrast with previous patterns, the recent bombings are the work of small, mainly localised groups with only tenuous links to established terrorist organisations. This suggests that terrorism will remain a problem for many years. Economic growth remains quite healthy, albeit not as strong as had been indicated by the data for the December quarter of 2010....
    Subject(s): Economics
    ISSN: 0007-4918
    E-ISSN: 1472-7234
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  • 4
    Language: English
    In: Oxford Development Studies, 02 October 2015, Vol.43(4), pp.483-507
    Description: This study utilises a large nationally representative household survey of unusual scope and richness from Indonesia to analyse how the receipt of educational transfers, scholarships and related assistance programmes affects the labour supply...
    Subject(s): Economics
    ISSN: 1360-0818
    E-ISSN: 1469-9966
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  • 5
    Language: English
    In: Bulletin of Indonesian Economic Studies, 04 May 2014, Vol.50(2), pp.227-242
    Description: We explore the nexus between poverty, inequality, and economic growth in Indonesia between 2002 and 2012, using several pro-poor growth concepts and indices to determine whether growth in this period benefited the poor. Our regression-based decompositions of poverty into growth and redistribution components suggest that around 40% of inequality in total household expenditure in Indonesia was due to variations in expenditure by education characteristics that persisted after controlling for other factors. We find that economic growth in this period benefited households at the top of the expenditure distribution, and that a 'trickle down' effect saw the poor receive proportionately fewer benefits than the non-poor. If reducing poverty is one of the Indonesian government's principal objectives, then policies designed to spur growth must take into account the possible impacts of growth on inequality.
    Subject(s): Economic Growth ; Poverty ; Inequality ; Pro-Poor ; Decomposition ; Economics
    ISSN: 0007-4918
    E-ISSN: 1472-7234
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  • 6
    In: Journal of International Development, July 2018, Vol.30(5), pp.837-864
    Description: In spite of the sustained economic growth and progress in reducing poverty, the status of child nutrition is abysmal in Indonesia with chronic malnutrition rates continuing to remain at very high levels. In this backdrop, this study attempts to shed light on the channels through which various socio‐economic factors affect children's nutritional status in Indonesia. Utilizing recent data from Indonesian Family Life Survey, and controlling for an exhaustive set of socio‐economic factors, it emerged that mother's education, water and sanitation conditions, household poverty and access to healthcare to strongly influence chronic malnutrition among children in Indonesia. Child stunting rates were surprisingly high even in the wealthiest quintile of households, implying that income growth merely will not automatically solve the nutritional problem. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
    Subject(s): Child Nutrition ; Malnutrition ; Stunting ; Quantile Regression ; Indonesia
    ISSN: 0954-1748
    E-ISSN: 1099-1328
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  • 7
    Language: English
    In: Journal of Economic Development, 06/2015, Vol.40(2), pp.1-33
    Description: The aim of this study is twofold. First, despite the vast empirical literature on testing the neoclassical model of economic growth using cross-country data, very few studies exist at the sub-national level. We attempt to fill this gap by utilizing panel data over the 2002-2012 period, a modified neoclassical growth equation, and a dynamic panel estimator to investigate the effect of both health and education capital on economic growth and poverty at the district level in Indonesia. Secondly, whilst most existing cross-country studies tend to concentrate only on education as a measure of human capital, we expand the analysis and probe the effects of health capital as well. As far as we are aware, no study has done a direct and comprehensive examination of the impacts of health on growth and poverty at the sub-national level. Thus this study is a premier at the sub-national level, and our findings will be particularly relevant in understanding the role of both health and education...
    Subject(s): 경제학 ; Economics;
    ISSN: 0254-8372
    Source: CrossRef
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  • 8
    Language: English
    In: Social Indicators Research, 2007, Vol.81(3), pp.543-578
    Description: Household consumption expenditure data is crucial for calculating important welfare measures such as poverty headcount rate. However, collecting such data is difficult and cumbersome. As an alternative, we experiment with three methods – consumption correlates model, poverty probability model, and wealth index principal components analysis (PCA) – to predict consumption expenditure and poverty using non-consumption indicators. The purpose is to use these alternatives for rapid monitoring and appraisal of social welfare as an early warning system. We test each method’s performance and find that the consumption correlates model is the best method to predict poverty quickly and relatively accurately. We find that education level, asset ownership, and consumption pattern are the best predictors of expenditure and poverty.
    Subject(s): consumption ; data ; expenditure ; Indonesia ; predictor ; poverty
    ISSN: 0303-8300
    E-ISSN: 1573-0921
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  • 9
    Language: English
    In: Journal of International Development, May 2013, Vol.25(4), pp.549-561
    Description: We develop a growth‐employment model that decomposes the Indonesian economy into six components, based on a combination of economic sectors and location, and ascertain the sectors that created the most jobs in Indonesia over the past two decades. We find that urban employment is mostly driven by higher growth in the services sector, especially areas that require skilled personnel. Meanwhile, the agriculture sector growth still drives employment in rural areas, although it appears that the services sector also creates a significant number of jobs. Based on these findings, we provide some policy recommendations. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
    Subject(s): Employment ; Economic Growth ; Indonesia
    ISSN: 0954-1748
    E-ISSN: 1099-1328
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  • 10
    Lexicon Article
    Lexicon Article
    2011
    ISSN: 0007-4918 
    In: Bulletin of Indonesian economic studies, 2011, Vol.47(2), p.155
    ISSN: 0007-4918
    Source: wiso Wirtschaftswissenschaften (GBI-Genios Deutsche Wirtschaftsdatenbank GmbH) 〈img src="http://exlibris-pub.s3.amazonaws.com/wiso_logo.jpg" style="vertical-align:middle;margin-left:7px"〉
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