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  • 1
    Article
    Article
    2018
    ISSN: 0141-6790 
    Language: English
    In: Art history, 2018-04, Vol.41 (2), p.344-369
    ISSN: 0141-6790
    E-ISSN: 1467-8365
    Source: Academic Search Ultimate
    Source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
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  • 2
    Article
    Article
    2017
    ISSN: 0004-3249 
    Language: English
    In: Art journal (New York. 1960), 2017-10-02, Vol.76 (3-4), p.32-47
    ISSN: 0004-3249
    E-ISSN: 2325-5307
    Source: Academic Search Ultimate
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  • 3
    Article
    Article
    2013
    ISSN: 0309-1333 
    Language: English
    In: Progress in physical geography, 2013-04, Vol.37 (2), p.248-258
    Description: This progress report on the discipline of fluvial geomorphology for the calendar years 2010–2011 extends the analysis carried out by Stott (2010, 2011) of papers published in Earth Surface Processes and Landforms (ESPL) during the calendar years 2006–2007 and 2008–2009 to include the period of 2010–2011. A total of 327 papers were published in the 30 issues of ESPL during the review period, up from 284 during 2006–2007 and 300 in 2008–2009. Of these papers, 175 (54%) were within the subject area of fluvial geomorphology, compared to 125 out of 284 (44%) in the 2006–2007 period, and 113 out of 297 (38%) in the 2008–2009 period. In comparing the three two-year periods covering 2006–2011, the numbers of papers in each of 10 subdisciplines within fluvial geomorphology (e.g. bank erosion, hydraulics, soil erosion) changed markedly. For example, river management, restoration and the effects of vegetation on fluvial systems changed from first in rank in 2006–2007 to tied in fourth place in 2008–2009 and eighth in 2010–2011. In contrast, the subdiscipline of soil erosion was consistently the second-ranked topic in each of the three two-year periods. Following the analysis of patterns of publications in ESPL, selected papers from each of the 10 subdisciplines are reviewed. The articles discussed were selected by searching using keywords from the 10 subdisciplines using http://scholar.google.co.uk, then selecting a relevant journal article from the first 10 hits returned. In this way, 33 papers drawn from 22 journals were sampled and their key findings are summarized.
    Subject(s): Bgi / Prodig ; Physical geography ; Geomorphology ; Fluvial forms and processes ; Sediment transport
    ISSN: 0309-1333
    E-ISSN: 1477-0296
    Source: Academic Search Ultimate
    Source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
    Source: © ProQuest LLC All rights reserved〈img src="https://exlibris-pub.s3.amazonaws.com/PQ_Logo.jpg" style="vertical-align:middle;margin-left:7px"〉
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  • 4
    Book
    Book
    2019
    ISBN: 3030186229  ISBN: 9783030186227 
    Language: English
    Description: This textbook presents a comprehensive overview of the environmental impacts of various types of adventure tourism and how these can be best managed. This volume follows on from the authors previous textbook - 'Outdoor Recreation: Environmental Impacts and Management' and continues the aim of developing a deeper understanding of how tourist numbers impact the environment and to provide practical solutions to these problems. Combining their own first-hand experience and research with extensive literature review the authors' present several popular adventure tourism destinations from across the globe, including the Arctic, the Himalayas, Africa, Australia and Scotland as case studies. Chapters cover the particular challenges faced by each region: including impacts on animals and birds; the spread of invasive plant species and diseases; trail impacts on vegetation; impacts on geological, historical and archaeological sites and pollution and waste issues. A discussion and evaluation of the possible management actions for minimising these impacts and how outdoor recreation tourists can be regulated concludes each chapter. This practical and engaging textbook will be invaluable to students and scholars of adventure tourism and outdoor recreation as well as practitioners and managers working in the field.
    Subject(s): Tourism-Environmental aspects ; Tourism ; Adventure travel
    ISBN: 3030186229
    ISBN: 9783030186227
    Source: Springer Earth and Environmental Science eBooks 2020 English/International
    Source: © ProQuest LLC All rights reserved〈img src="https://exlibris-pub.s3.amazonaws.com/PQ_Logo.jpg" style="vertical-align:middle;margin-left:7px"〉
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  • 5
    Article
    Article
    2011
    ISSN: 0309-1333 
    Language: English
    In: Progress in Physical Geography, 2011-12, Vol.35 (6), p.810-830
    Description: This progress report on the discipline of fluvial geomorphology reviews 134 papers, 112 of which were published in Earth Surface Processes and Landforms (ESPL) during the calendar years of 2008 and 2009. It continues where the last report for 2006 and 2007 (Stott, 2010) ended. Papers are again grouped by themes to cover 10 subdisciplines within the subject area. The themes were chosen by classifying all geomorphological articles published in ESPL for the same period, of which 38% were within the subject area of fluvial geomorphology. Themes (in order of number contributing to the total) were: fluvial sediment transport; soil erosion and control; modelling the fluvial environment; river management, restoration and effects of vegetation on fluvial systems; gully and hillslope sediment transfer; river regulation, channel change and human influences; advances in methodology in fluvial geomorphology; fluvial hydraulics; fluvial chronology; and bank erosion in fluvial systems. The 2006–2007 and 2008–2009 periods are compared and it was found that broadly the same themes retained their popularity (in terms of numbers of papers published) as in the previous report for 2006–2007.
    Subject(s): Bgi / Prodig ; Physical geography ; Geomorphology ; Fluvial forms and processes ; Soil erosion ; Rivers ; Sediment transport
    ISSN: 0309-1333
    E-ISSN: 1477-0296
    Source: Academic Search Ultimate
    Source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
    Source: © ProQuest LLC All rights reserved〈img src="https://exlibris-pub.s3.amazonaws.com/PQ_Logo.jpg" style="vertical-align:middle;margin-left:7px"〉
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  • 6
    Language: English
    In: Social semiotics, 2019-07-10, p.1-21
    ISSN: 1035-0330
    E-ISSN: 1470-1219
    Source: Academic Search Ultimate
    Source: MLA International Bibliography with Full Text
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  • 7
    Article
    Article
    2010
    ISSN: 0309-1333 
    Language: English
    In: Progress in physical geography, 2010-04, Vol.34 (2), p.221-245
    Description: This progress report on the discipline of fluvial geomorphology reviews 147 papers published in 21 key journals during the calendar years of 2006 and 2007. Papers are grouped by themes to cover 10 subject areas. The themes were chosen by classifying all geomorphological articles published in a single leading journal for the same period, of which (44%) were within the subject area of fluvial geomorphology. Themes (in order of number contributing to the total) were: ‘River management, restoration and effects of vegetation on fluvial systems’; ‘Soil erosion and control’; ‘Fluvial hydraulics’; ‘Fluvial sediment transport’; ‘Gully and hillslope sediment transfer’; ‘Modelling the fluvial environment’; ‘River regulation, channel change and human influences’; ‘Advances in methodology in fluvial geomorphology’; ‘Bank erosion in fluvial systems’; and ‘Holocene fluvial chronology’.
    Subject(s): Bgi / Prodig ; Physical geography ; Geomorphology ; Fluvial forms and processes ; Fluid mechanics ; Stream flow ; Soil erosion ; Rivers ; Soil erosion control ; Sediment transport
    ISSN: 0309-1333
    E-ISSN: 1477-0296
    Source: Academic Search Ultimate
    Source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
    Source: © ProQuest LLC All rights reserved〈img src="https://exlibris-pub.s3.amazonaws.com/PQ_Logo.jpg" style="vertical-align:middle;margin-left:7px"〉
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  • 8
    Language: English
    In: Studies in higher education (Dorchester-on-Thames), 2014-05-28, Vol.39 (5), p.711-733
    Description: This four-year mixed method longitudinal study utilises data collected from four cohorts of Outdoor Education (OE) students to compare 'fresher' and 'graduate' identities and to explore the impact of identity on graduate employment. Findings demonstrate that compared to other programmes, and the university as a whole, OE students had a very distinctive 'fresher' profile characterised by active pre-university engagement with the outdoor community of practice, clear vision of their future careers, and how university could contribute to their personal and professional development. Most OE students appear to maintain this strategic approach throughout the three years of their degree, which results, on one hand, in a relatively high employment rate, but on the other hand, in a limited engagement with other developmental opportunities that could enhance their employability if they had chosen a different career route.
    Subject(s): fresher identity ; employment destinations ; outdoor education ; graduate identity; higher education ; employability
    ISSN: 0307-5079
    E-ISSN: 1470-174X
    Source: Academic Search Ultimate
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  • 9
    Language: English
    In: Journal of geography in higher education, 2011-02-01, Vol.35 (1), p.47-65
    Description: Greater flexibility in delivery resulting from increased use of e-learning will inevitably change the way university students approach studying. Recent studies have examined relationships between attendance, online learning and performance but findings are inconclusive. One concern is that an unintended consequence of placing lecture resources online may be increased absenteeism possibly leading to decrease in performance. This study explores patterns of student engagement across two geography courses. Findings corroborate the importance of attendance as a predictor of performance, demonstrate how assessment influences study behaviour, particularly online, and provide evidence for a need for integrated blended learning designs.
    Subject(s): E-learning ; assessment ; engagement ; attendance ; Geography ; Higher education ; University students ; Online instruction ; Colleges & universities
    ISSN: 0309-8265
    E-ISSN: 1466-1845
    Source: Academic Search Ultimate
    Source: © ProQuest LLC All rights reserved〈img src="https://exlibris-pub.s3.amazonaws.com/PQ_Logo.jpg" style="vertical-align:middle;margin-left:7px"〉
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  • 10
    Language: English
    In: Earth surface processes and landforms, 2015-09-15, Vol.40 (11), p.1542-1559
    Description: Glaciers are major agents of erosion that increase sediment load to the downstream fluvial system. The Castle Creek Glacier, British Columbia, Canada, has retreated ~1.0 km in the past 70 years. Suspended sediment concentration (SSC) and streamflow (Q) were monitored independently at five sites within its pro‐glacial zone over a 60 day period from July to September 2011, representing part of the ablation season. Meteorological data were collected from two automatic weather stations proximal to the glacier. The time‐series were divided into hydrologic days and the shape and magnitude of the SSC response to hydro‐meteorological conditions (‘cold and wet’, ‘hot and dry’, ‘warm and damp’, and ‘storm’) were categorized using principal component analysis (PCA) and cluster analysis (CA). Suspended sediment load (SSL) was computed and summarized for the categories. The distribution of monitoring sites and results of the multivariate statistical analyses describe the temporal and spatial variability of suspended sediment flux and the relative importance of glacial and para‐glacial sediment sources in the pro‐glacial zone. During the 2011 study period, ~ 60% of the total SSL was derived from the glacial stream and sediment deposits proximal to the terminus of the glacier; during ‘storm’ events, that contribution dropped to ~40% as the contribution from diffuse and point sources of sediment throughout the pro‐glacial zone and within the meltwater channels increased. While ‘storm’ events accounted for just 3% of the study period, SSL was ~600% higher than the average over the monitoring period, and ~20% of the total SSL was generated in that time. Determining how hydro‐meteorological conditions and sediment sources control sediment fluxes will assist attempts to predict how pro‐glacial zones respond to future climate changes. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
    Subject(s): sediment budget ; turbidity ; pro‐glacial ; British Columbia ; suspended sediment ; para‐glacial sediment sources ; Weather ; Automobile drivers ; Geomorphology ; Sediment, Suspended ; Analysis ; Glaciers ; Streamflow ; Sediment transport
    ISSN: 0197-9337
    E-ISSN: 1096-9837
    Source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
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