placeholder
and
and

Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Proceed order?

Export
Filter
Language
Year
  • 1
    Language: English
    In: Nature (London), 2013-05-30, Vol.497 (7451), p.611-614
    Description: Apes and Old World monkeys are prominent components of modern African and Asian ecosystems, yet the earliest phases of their evolutionary history have remained largely undocumented. The absence of crown catarrhine fossils older than ∼20 million years (Myr) has stood in stark contrast to molecular divergence estimates of ∼25-30 Myr for the split between Cercopithecoidea (Old World monkeys) and Hominoidea (apes), implying long ghost lineages for both clades. Here we describe the oldest known fossil 'ape', represented by a partial mandible preserving dental features that place it with 'nyanzapithecine' stem hominoids. Additionally, we report the oldest stem member of the Old World monkey clade, represented by a lower third molar. Both specimens were recovered from a precisely dated 25.2-Myr-old stratum in the Rukwa Rift, a segment of the western branch of the East African Rift in Tanzania. These finds extend the fossil record of apes and Old World monkeys well into the Oligocene epoch of Africa, suggesting a possible link between diversification of crown catarrhines and changes in the African landscape brought about by previously unrecognized tectonic activity in the East African rift system.
    Subject(s): Hominidae - anatomy & histology ; History, Ancient ; Animals ; Mandible - anatomy & histology ; Cercopithecidae - classification ; Tanzania ; Cercopithecidae - anatomy & histology ; Phylogeny ; Tooth - anatomy & histology ; Hominidae - classification ; Fossils ; Apes ; Divergent evolution ; Old-World monkeys ; Research ; Observations ; Paleontology ; Natural history ; Index Medicus
    ISSN: 0028-0836
    E-ISSN: 1476-4687
    Source: Academic Search Ultimate
    Source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
    Source: © ProQuest LLC All rights reserved〈img src="https://exlibris-pub.s3.amazonaws.com/PQ_Logo.jpg" style="vertical-align:middle;margin-left:7px"〉
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    Language: English
    In: Historical biology, 2019-07-03, Vol.31 (6), p.784-793
    Description: Prionogale breviceps is a tiny carnivorous mammal from the early Miocene of eastern Africa. Originally, specimens were interpreted as the adult morphology of the taxon. The dentition did not obviously align Prionogale with the carnivorous lineages present in Afro-Arabia during the early Miocene: Hyaenodonta and Carnivora. When Namasector was discovered in Namibia, the small taxa were placed together in Prionogalidae and aligned with Hyaenodonta. In this study, based on comparisons to hyaenodont specimens preserving deciduous dentition, the holotype of Prionogale is reinterpreted as preserving dP3 and dP4. Some of the lower dental specimens attributed to the taxon preserve dp4. The holotype of Namasector also preserves deciduous dental material. A phylogenetic analysis that includes deciduous dental characters for a broader sample of hyaenodonts resolved Prionogalidae as a clade. Understanding of the deciduous dentition of Prionogale allows future analyses to compare homologous morphology, and to explore the environmental factors that shaped carnivorous mammal evolution through the Miocene.
    Subject(s): Hyaenodonta ; Neogene ; Creodonta ; Africa ; phylogeny ; carnivory ; ontogeny
    ISSN: 0891-2963
    E-ISSN: 1029-2381
    Source: Academic Search Ultimate
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 3
    Language: English
    In: Nature communications, 2018-08-21, Vol.9 (1), p.3193-3193
    Description: In 1967 G.G. Simpson described three partial mandibles from early Miocene deposits in Kenya that he interpreted as belonging to a new strepsirrhine primate, Propotto. This interpretation was quickly challenged, with the assertion that Propotto was not a primate, but rather a pteropodid fruit bat. The latter interpretation has not been questioned for almost half a century. Here we re-evaluate the affinities of Propotto, drawing upon diverse lines of evidence to establish that this strange mammal is a strepsirrhine primate as originally suggested by Simpson. Moreover, our phylogenetic analyses support the recognition of Propotto, together with late Eocene Plesiopithecus from Egypt, as African stem chiromyiform lemurs that are exclusively related to the extant aye-aye (Daubentonia) from Madagascar. Our results challenge the long-held view that all lemurs are descended from a single ancient colonization of Madagascar, and present an intriguing alternative scenario in which two lemur lineages dispersed from Africa to Madagascar independently, possibly during the later Cenozoic.
    Subject(s): Primates - physiology ; Phylogeography ; Egypt ; Madagascar ; Extinction, Biological ; Phylogeny ; Kenya ; Fossils ; Biological Evolution ; Animals ; Molar - anatomy & histology ; Principal Component Analysis ; Lemur - physiology ; Index Medicus
    ISSN: 2041-1723
    E-ISSN: 2041-1723
    Source: Nature Open Access
    Source: PubMed Central
    Source: Directory of Open Access Journals
    Source: © ProQuest LLC All rights reserved〈img src="https://exlibris-pub.s3.amazonaws.com/PQ_Logo.jpg" style="vertical-align:middle;margin-left:7px"〉
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 4
    Language: English
    In: Oryx, 2020-01-23, p.1-10
    Description: Abstract The Vulnerable fosa Cryptoprocta ferox is the largest native carnivore in Madagascar, fulfilling a unique ecological niche in the island's remaining forests. Negative interactions with humans threaten the long-term viability of most remaining fosa populations across Madagascar. Threats to the fosa include habitat loss and persecution by humans resulting from perceived predation on domestic animals. We used GPS collars to record space use and activity patterns of five fosas in Ankarafantsika National Park, Madagascar, during the dry seasons of 2016 and 2017. The results, with up to 2,110 recorded locations per individual, indicated fosas’ home ranges and movements were not limited to the forest, and all collared individuals used networks of habitat patches and corridors to navigate deforested areas. The fosas studied in Ankarafantsika National Park had significantly larger home ranges than those reported in previous studies in other protected areas. They were rarely found within village boundaries and appeared to avoid areas of human habitation, suggesting that during the study period livestock was not a significant component of the fosas’ diet in this Park. Our results suggest that fosas have some flexibility that enables them to adapt to living near deforested and human-dominated areas by altering their space-use patterns, but they are compensating by increasing their home range size.
    ISSN: 0030-6053
    E-ISSN: 1365-3008
    Source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 5
    Language: English
    In: Frontiers in public health, 2020, Vol.8, p.1-1
    Description: Mountain gorillas ( ) are an endangered primate species, with ~43% of the 1,063 individuals that remain on the planet today residing in Bwindi Impenetrable National Park (BINP) in southwestern Uganda. These primates are at the heart of a growing tourism industry that has incentivized their continued protection, but close proximity between humans and gorillas during such encounters presents well-documented risks for disease transmission. The Uganda Wildlife Authority (UWA) has developed rules to help protect the health of the gorillas, limiting each habituated gorilla group to a single 60 min visit each day by a group of no more than 8 tourists, and emphasizing that humans maintain a 〉7 m distance from gorillas at all times. A number of studies have documented that not all tour groups respect these rules. This project assesses rule-adherence during gorilla tourism encounters at BINP using both observational and survey-based data collected during the tourism high season between May and August, 2014. Observational data from 53 treks reveal that groups of 1-11 tourists engaged in gorilla viewing encounters between 46 and 98 min in duration. Although 96% of pre-trek briefings conducted by park rangers emphasized the need to maintain 〉7 m human-gorilla spacing, the 7 m distance rule was violated in over 98% (52 out of 53) of the tours examined in this study. Observational data were collected at 2 min intervals during gorilla-viewing encounters, documenting the nearest distance between any tourist and a gorilla ( = 1,604), of which 1,094 observations (68.2%) took place at a distance less than or equal to 7 m. Importantly, the 7 m rule was violated in visits to all of the gorilla groups habituated during the time of the study. In 224 observations (~14%, per 1,604 total), human-gorilla spacing was 3 m or less. Survey data ( = 243) revealed promising opportunities to improve tourist understanding of and adherence to park rules, with 73.6% of respondents indicating that they would be willing to utilize a precautionary measure of wearing a face-mask during encounters to protect gorilla health.
    Subject(s): Gorillas ; Sales promotions ; National parks and reserves ; Travel industry ; gorilla ; primate ; tourism ; Uganda ; disease transmission ; ecotourism
    ISSN: 2296-2565
    E-ISSN: 2296-2565
    Source: PubMed Central
    Source: Directory of Open Access Journals
    Source: © ProQuest LLC All rights reserved〈img src="https://exlibris-pub.s3.amazonaws.com/PQ_Logo.jpg" style="vertical-align:middle;margin-left:7px"〉
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 6
    Language: English
    In: Nature (London), 2010, Vol.466 (7307), p.748-751
    Description: Fossil crocodyliforms discovered in recent years have revealed a level of morphological and ecological diversity not exhibited by extant members of the group. This diversity is particularly notable among taxa of the Cretaceous Period (144-65 million years ago) recovered from former Gondwanan landmasses. Here we report the discovery of a new species of Cretaceous notosuchian crocodyliform from the Rukwa Rift Basin of southwestern Tanzania. This small-bodied form deviates significantly from more typical crocodyliform craniodental morphologies, having a short, broad skull, robust lower jaw, and a dentition with relatively few teeth that nonetheless show marked heterodonty. The presence of morphologically complex, complementary upper and lower molariform teeth suggests a degree of crown-crown contact during jaw adduction that is unmatched among known crocodyliforms, paralleling the level of occlusal complexity seen in mammals and their extinct relatives. The presence of another small-bodied mammal-like crocodyliform in the Cretaceous of Gondwana indicates that notosuchians probably filled niches and inhabited ecomorphospace that were otherwise occupied by mammals on northern continents.
    Subject(s): Earth, ocean, space ; Vertebrate paleontology ; Earth sciences ; Paleontology ; Exact sciences and technology ; Biological Evolution ; History, Ancient ; Mammals - classification ; Animals ; Dentition ; Mammals - physiology ; Tanzania ; Tomography, X-Ray Computed ; Phylogeny ; Mammals - anatomy & histology ; Fossils ; Crocodilia ; Natural history ; Index Medicus
    ISSN: 0028-0836
    E-ISSN: 1476-4687
    Source: Academic Search Ultimate
    Source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
    Source: © ProQuest LLC All rights reserved〈img src="https://exlibris-pub.s3.amazonaws.com/PQ_Logo.jpg" style="vertical-align:middle;margin-left:7px"〉
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 7
    Language: English
    In: Acta palaeontologica Polonica, 2019-03-01, Vol.64 (1), p.65-84
    Description: We here establish a new mammaliaform genus and species, Galulatherium jenkinsi (Mammalia), from the Upper Cretaceous Galula Formation in the Rukwa Rift Basin of southwestern Tanzania. This represents the first named taxon of a mammaliaform from the entire Late Cretaceous of continental Afro-Arabia, an interval of 34 million years. Preliminary study of the holotypic and only known specimen (a partial dentary) resulted in tentative assignation to the Gondwanatheria, a poorly known, enigmatic clade of Late Cretaceous-Paleogene Gondwanan mammals (Krause et al. 2003). The application of advanced imaging ([micro]CT) and visualization techniques permits a more detailed understanding of key anatomical features of the new taxon. It reveals that the lower dentition consisted of a large, procumbent lower incisor and four cheek teeth, all of which were evergrowing (hypselodont). Importantly, all of the teeth appear devoid of enamel. Comparisons conducted with a range of Mesozoic and selected Cenozoic mammaliaform groups document a number of features (e.g., columnar, enamel-less and evergrowing teeth, with relatively simple occlusal morphology) expressed in Galulatherium that are reminiscent of several distantly related groups, making taxonomic assignment difficult at this time. Herein we retain the provisional referral of Galulatherium (RRBP 02067) to Gondwanatheria; it is most similar to sudamericids such as Lavanify and Bharratherium from the Late Cretaceous of Madagascar and India, respectively, in exhibiting relatively simple, high-crowned, columnar cheek teeth. Other features (e.g., enamel-less dentition) are shared with disparate forms such as the Late Jurassic Fruitafossor and toothed xenarthrans (e.g., sloths), here attributed to convergence. Revised analyses of the depositional context for the holotype place it as having lived sometime between the late Turonian and latest Campanian (roughly 91-72 million years ago). This enhanced geochronological context helps to refine the palaeobiogeographical significance of Galulatherium among Cretaceous mammals in general and those from Gondwanan landmasses specifically.
    Subject(s): Physiological aspects ; Identification and classification ; Mammals, Fossil ; Mammaliaformes ; Galulatherium ; Mammalia ; Gondwanatheria ; Late Cretaceous ; Tanzania
    ISSN: 0567-7920
    E-ISSN: 1732-2421
    Source: Academic Search Ultimate
    Source: Directory of Open Access Journals
    Source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 8
    Language: English
    In: Ibis (London, England), 2014-01, Vol.156 (1), p.198-208
    Description: Head‐bobbing is the fore–aft movement of the head relative to the body during terrestrial locomotion in birds. It is considered to be a behaviour that helps to stabilize images on the retina during locomotion, yet some studies have suggested biomechanical links between the movements of the head and legs. This study analysed terrestrial locomotion and head‐bobbing in the Elegant‐crested Tinamou Eudromia elegans at a range of speeds by synchronously recording high‐speed video and ground reaction forces in a laboratory setting. The results indicate that the timing of head and leg movements are dissociated from one another. Nonetheless, head and neck movements do affect stance duration, ground reaction forces and body pitch and, as a result, the movement of the centre of mass in head‐bobbing birds. This study does not support the hypothesis that head‐bobbing is itself constrained by terrestrial locomotion. Instead, it suggests that visual cues are the primary trigger for head‐bobbing in birds, and locomotion is, in turn, constrained by a need for image stabilization and depth perception.
    Subject(s): biomechanics ; pitch ; bird ; locomotion ; Fundamental and applied biological sciences. Psychology ; Vertebrata ; Animals ; Animal, plant and microbial ecology ; Biological and medical sciences ; Animal and plant ecology ; Vertebrates: general zoology, morphology, phylogeny, systematics, cytogenetics, geographical distribution ; Aves ; Autoecology
    ISSN: 0019-1019
    E-ISSN: 1474-919X
    Source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 9
    Language: English
    In: Di xue qian yuan., 2019-05, Vol.10 (3), p.1039-1063
    Description: The early Paleogene is critical for understanding global biodiversity patterns in modern ecosystems. During this interval, Southern Hemisphere continents were largely characterized by isolation and faunal endemism following the breakup of Gondwana. Africa has been proposed as an important source area for the origin of several marine vertebrate groups but its Paleogene record is poorly sampled, especially from sub-Saharan Africa. To document the early Paleogene marine ecosystems of Central Africa, we revised the stratigraphic context of sedimentary deposits from three fossil-rich vertebrate localities: the Landana section in the Cabinda exclave (Angola), and the Manzadi and Bololo localities in western Democratic Republic of Congo. We provide more refined age constraints for these three localities based on invertebrate and vertebrate faunas, foraminiferal and dinoflagellate cyst assemblages, and carbon isotope records. We find an almost complete absence of Danian-aged rocks in the Landana section, contrary to prevailing interpretations over the last half a century (only the layer 1, at the base of the section, seems to be Danian). Refining the age of these Paleocene layers is crucial for analyzing fish evolution in a global framework, with implications for the early appearance of Scombridae (tunas and mackerels) and Tetraodontiformes (puffer fishes). The combination of vertebrate fossil records from Manzadi and Landana sections suggests important environmental changes around the K/Pg transition characterized by an important modification of the ichthyofauna. A small faunal shift may have occurred during the Selandian. More dramatic is the distinct decrease in overall richness that lasts from the Selandian to the Ypresian. The Lutetian of West Central Africa is characterized by the first appearance of numerous cartilaginous and bony fishes. Our analysis of the ichthyofauna moreover indicates two periods of faunal exchanges: one during the Paleocene, where Central Africa appears to have been a source for the European marine fauna, and another during the Eocene when Europe was the source of the Central Africa fauna. These data indicate that Central Africa has had connections with the Tethyian realm. [Display omitted] •An almost complete absence of Danian-aged rocks in the Landana section.•Important faunal shifts during the Selandian and between the Ypresian and Lutetian.•Central Africa had important connections with the Tethyian realm.
    Subject(s): Planktonic foraminifera ; Paleogene ; Vertebrates ; Stratigraphy ; Central Africa ; Carbon isotope ; Life Sciences ; Populations and Evolution ; Earth Sciences ; Sciences of the Universe ; Biodiversity ; Paleontology
    ISSN: 1674-9871
    Source: Directory of Open Access Journals
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 10
    Language: English
    In: Journal of paleontology, 2006, Vol.80 (2), p.407-409
    Description: The evolutionary history of the living African rodent families is a topic of considerable debate, yet it is generally agreed that the modern cane rats (Thryonomys Fitzinger, 1867) and dassie rats (Petromus Smith, 1831) have an evolutionary history within the infraorder Phiomorpha (e.g., Wood, 1968). Phiomorphs possess hystricognathous mandibular morphology, multiserial incisor enamel, and hystricomorphous attachment of the masseteric musculature (e.g., Lavocat, 1978; Holroyd, 1994). In his initial work on the group, Wood (1968) placed all phiomorph taxa into a single family, and named a handful of morphologically diverse species based mainly on size. Lavocat (1978) later revised the taxonomy of the group, raising many of the differences among species to the family level. More recently, Holroyd (1994) observed that these contrasting views likely stemmed from the fact that Wood's phiomorph work emphasized the overall similarity of Paleogene specimens from the Fayum of Egypt, whereas Lavocat endeavored to explain the diverse Miocene rodent faunas from East Africa, envisioning that each of the Miocene forms had an ancestor among the Paleogene taxa. In this paper we adopt Holroyd's (1994) revised version of family-level relationships among the phiomorphs.
    Subject(s): Paleontological Notes ; Mbeya Tanzania ; Paleogene ; Phiomyidae ; Chordata ; morphology ; Red Sandstone Group ; Tertiary ; Africa ; Rodentia ; Tanzania ; vertebrate ; Eutheria ; Paleontology ; Vertebrata ; Mammalia ; Metaphiomys beadnelli ; Songwe Valley ; southwestern Tanzania ; Theria ; teeth ; Cenozoic ; East Africa ; Tetrapoda ; Sandstones ; Taxa ; Vertebrates ; Biological taxonomies ; Geographic regions ; Rodents ; Teeth ; Evolution ; Natural history ; Paleogene period
    ISSN: 0022-3360
    E-ISSN: 1937-2337
    Source: BioOne.1
    Source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. More information can be found here...