placeholder
and
and

Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Proceed order?

Export
Filter
Language
Year
  • 1
    Language: English
    In: Chemical communications (Cambridge, England), 2018-11-20, Vol.54 (93), p.134-1359
    Description: The unique photophysical properties of Ru( ii ) polypyridyl complexes make them very attractive candidates as photosensitisers in Photodynamic Therapy (PDT). However, to date, there are not many studies exploring in detail the mechanism(s) of action of such compounds in living systems upon light irradiation. This feature article provides an overview of the most in-depth biological studies on such compounds. This feature article provides an overview of the most in-depth biological studies on Ru( ii ) polypyridyl complexes upon light activation.
    Subject(s): Index Medicus ; Medicinal Chemistry ; Chemical Sciences
    ISSN: 1359-7345
    E-ISSN: 1364-548X
    Source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
    Source: © ProQuest LLC All rights reserved〈img src="https://exlibris-pub.s3.amazonaws.com/PQ_Logo.jpg" style="vertical-align:middle;margin-left:7px"〉
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    Language: English
    In: The lancet oncology, 2013, Vol.14 (9), p.901-908
    Description: Summary Background Giant cell tumour of bone (GCTB) is a very rare, aggressive, and progressive osteolytic tumour for which no standard medicinal treatment or chemotherapy exists. We report interim safety and efficacy results from a phase 2 study of denosumab in patients with GCTB. Methods We did an international, open-label, parallel-group, phase 2 trial of patients with histologically confirmed GCTB and radiographically measurable active disease. Eligible patients were adults or skeletally mature adolescents with radiographic evidence of at least one mature long bone who were at least 12 years old and weighed at least 45 kg. We divided patients into three cohorts—those with surgically unsalvageable GCTB (cohort 1), those with salvageable GCTB whose surgery was associated with severe morbidity (cohort 2), and those who transferred from a previous study of denosumab for GCTB (cohort 3). Patients in cohorts 1 and 2 received 120 mg of subcutaneous denosumab every 4 weeks with loading doses on days 8 and 15 of the first cycle; those in cohort 3 continued the regimen from the previous study. Investigator-determined disease status and clinical benefit were assessed every 4 weeks. Our primary endpoint was the safety profile of denosumab in terms of adverse events and laboratory abnormalities. Prespecified secondary endpoints were time to disease progression in cohort 1 and the proportion of patients without any surgery at 6 months in cohort 2. Safety analyses included all patients who received at least one dose of denosumab. Efficacy analyses included all eligible patients who received at least one dose of denosumab. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov , identifier NCT00680992. Findings 282 patients, including ten adolescents, were included between Sept 9, 2008, and March 25, 2011. Of the 281 patients analysable for safety, three (1%) had osteonecrosis of the jaw and 15 (5%) hypocalcaemia. The most common grade 3–4 adverse events were hypophosphataemia, which occurred in nine (3%) patients, and anaemia, back pain, and pain in extremities, each of which occurred in three patients (1%). Serious adverse events were reported in 25 (9%) patients. No treatment-related deaths were reported. On the basis of investigators' assessment of disease status, 163 of 169 (96%) analysable patients in cohort 1 had no disease progression after median follow-up of 13 months (IQR 5·8–21·0). In cohort 2, 74 of 100 (74%) analysable patients had no surgery and 16 of 26 (62%) patients who had surgery underwent a less morbid procedure than planned. Median follow-up in cohort 2 was 9·2 months (IQR 4·2–12·9). Interpretation Adverse events were consistent with the known safety profile of denosumab. Denosumab was associated with tumour responses and reduced the need for morbid surgery in patients with GCTB. Denosumab represents a new treatment option for patients with GCTB. Funding Amgen.
    Subject(s): Hematology, Oncology and Palliative Medicine ; Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized - therapeutic use ; Prognosis ; Follow-Up Studies ; Humans ; Middle Aged ; Male ; Neoplasm Recurrence, Local - diagnosis ; Denosumab ; Young Adult ; Giant Cell Tumor of Bone - drug therapy ; International Agencies ; Adolescent ; Neoplasm Recurrence, Local - chemically induced ; Adult ; Female ; Bone Neoplasms - drug therapy ; Cohort Studies ; Youth ; Chemotherapy ; Teenagers ; Sarcoma ; Cancer ; Index Medicus
    ISSN: 1470-2045
    E-ISSN: 1474-5488
    Source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
    Source: © ProQuest LLC All rights reserved〈img src="https://exlibris-pub.s3.amazonaws.com/PQ_Logo.jpg" style="vertical-align:middle;margin-left:7px"〉
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 3
    Language: English
    In: The lancet oncology, 2015, Vol.16 (1), p.98-107
    Description: Summary Background Results of previous study showed promising but short-lived activity of sorafenib in the treatment of patients with unresectable advanced and metastatic osteosarcoma. This treatment failure has been attributed to the mTOR pathway and might therefore be overcome with the addition of mTOR inhibitors. We aimed to investigate the activity of sorafenib in combination with everolimus in patients with inoperable high-grade osteosarcoma progressing after standard treatment. Methods We did this non-randomised phase 2 trial in three Italian Sarcoma Group centres. We enrolled adults (≥18 years) with relapsed or unresectable osteosarcoma progressing after standard treatment (methotrexate, cisplatin, and doxorubicin, with or without ifosfamide). Patients received 800 mg sorafenib plus 5 mg everolimus once a day until disease progression or unacceptable toxic effects. The primary endpoint was 6 month progression-free survival (PFS). All analyses were intention-to-treat. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov , number NCT01804374. Findings We enrolled 38 patients between June 16, 2011, and June 4, 2013. 17 (45%; 95% CI 28–61) of 38 patients were progression free at 6 months. Toxic effects led to dose reductions, or short interruptions, or both in 25 (66%) of 38 patients and permanent discontinuation for two (5%) patients. The most common grade 3–4 adverse events were lymphopenia and hypophosphataemia each in six (16%) patients, hand and foot syndrome in five (13%), thrombocytopenia in four (11%), and fatigue, oral mucositis, diarrhoea, and anaemia each in two (5%). One patient (3%) had a grade 3 pneumothorax that required trans-thoracic drainage, and that recurred at the time of disease progression. This was reported as a serious adverse event related to the study drugs in both instances. No other serious adverse events were reported during the trial. There were no treatment-related deaths. Interpretation Although the combination of sorafenib and everolimus showed activity as a further-line treatment for patients with advanced or unresectable osteosarcoma, it did not attain the prespecified target of 6 month PFS of 50% or greater. Funding Italian Sarcoma Group.
    Subject(s): Hematology, Oncology and Palliative Medicine ; Niacinamide - analogs & derivatives ; Osteosarcoma - drug therapy ; TOR Serine-Threonine Kinases - metabolism ; Humans ; Middle Aged ; Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols - adverse effects ; Male ; Bone Neoplasms - pathology ; TOR Serine-Threonine Kinases - antagonists & inhibitors ; Young Adult ; Neoplasm Grading ; Time Factors ; Adult ; Female ; Bone Neoplasms - drug therapy ; Everolimus ; Sirolimus - analogs & derivatives ; Bone Neoplasms - enzymology ; Osteosarcoma - enzymology ; Kaplan-Meier Estimate ; Treatment Outcome ; Disease Progression ; Niacinamide - administration & dosage ; Disease-Free Survival ; Sirolimus - administration & dosage ; Phenylurea Compounds - administration & dosage ; Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols - therapeutic use ; Adolescent ; Intention to Treat Analysis ; Italy ; Osteosarcoma - secondary ; Antimitotic agents ; Chemotherapy ; Osteosarcoma ; Stem cells ; Clinical trials ; Product development ; Antineoplastic agents ; Standards ; Cancer ; Index Medicus
    ISSN: 1470-2045
    E-ISSN: 1474-5488
    Source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
    Source: © ProQuest LLC All rights reserved〈img src="https://exlibris-pub.s3.amazonaws.com/PQ_Logo.jpg" style="vertical-align:middle;margin-left:7px"〉
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 4
    Language: English
    In: American journal of ophthalmology, 2016-06, Vol.166, p.120-125
    Description: To determine the feasibility of preloading endothelial tissues for Descemet membrane endothelial keratoplasty (DMEK). Laboratory investigation. setting: Institutional. participants: Twenty human donor corneas unsuitable for transplantation with endothelial cell density in a range of 1600–2700 cells/mm2. Intervention: The endothelium was punched, stripped (8.5 mm diameter) and manually tri-folded with the endothelial side inward. The excised membranes were gently moved in a 2.2 intraocular lens (IOL) cartridge and pulled further in the funnel using 25 G end-grasping forceps. The cartridge was filled with transport media (TM) (sealed at its funnel and back entrance with a stopper) and the tissue was preserved for 4 days at room temperature in the bottles containing TM. main outcome measures: Success rate of preparation, processing time, endothelial cell loss (ECL), and active metabolism. The tissues were peeled and loaded successfully in all cases. Average stripping and loading time was 20 and 4.5 minutes, respectively. ECL after preservation was 4.35% with 3.55% (± 5.89%) mortality and 7.80% (± 14.12%) uncovered areas. A total of 0.55 (± 0.26) mg/mL of glucose was consumed by the cells showing active metabolism. Tri-folded (endothelium-in) DMEK grafts can be preloaded using TM in an IOL cartridge and stored up to 4 days with limited endothelial damage. Direct injection of TM should be avoided because of the presence of bovine serum, but the tissue can be washed using balanced salt solution and gently injected. Alternatively, the graft can be easily delivered using a bimanual pull-through technique. Preloading DMEK grafts will simplify the surgery with reproducibility, reduced surgical time, and reduced tissue wastage, cost, and logistical requirements.
    Subject(s): Descemet Stripping Endothelial Keratoplasty - instrumentation ; Endothelium, Corneal - cytology ; Endothelium, Corneal - physiology ; Prospective Studies ; Cell Count ; Humans ; Middle Aged ; Descemet Membrane - cytology ; Male ; Feasibility Studies ; Descemet Membrane - physiology ; Glucose - metabolism ; Tissue and Organ Harvesting ; Female ; Aged ; Tissue Donors ; Organ Preservation Solutions ; Cell Survival - physiology ; Health aspects ; Endothelium ; Ophthalmology ; Theater ; Surgery ; Mortality ; Index Medicus ; Abridged Index Medicus
    ISSN: 0002-9394
    E-ISSN: 1879-1891
    Source: Freedom Collection Journals [SCFCJ]
    Source: © ProQuest LLC All rights reserved〈img src="https://exlibris-pub.s3.amazonaws.com/PQ_Logo.jpg" style="vertical-align:middle;margin-left:7px"〉
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 5
    Language: English
    In: Angewandte Chemie (International ed.), 2014-03-10, Vol.53 (11), p.2960-2963
    Description: Improving the selectivity of anticancer drugs towards cancer cells is one of the main goals of drug optimization; the prodrug strategy has been one of the most promising. A light‐triggered prodrug strategy is presented as an efficient approach for controlling cytotoxicity of the substitutionally inert cytotoxic complex [Ru(dppz)2(CppH)](PF6)2 (C1; CppH=2‐(2‐pyridyl)pyrimidine‐4‐carboxylic acid; dppz=dipyrido[3,2‐a:2′,3′‐c]phenazine). Attachment of a photolabile 3‐(4,5‐dimethoxy‐2‐nitrophenyl)‐2‐butyl (DMNPB) ester (“photocaging”) makes the otherwise active complex C1 innocuous to both cancerous (HeLa and U2OS) and non‐cancerous (MRC‐5) cells. The cytotoxic action can be successfully unleashed in living cells upon light illumination (350 nm), reaching similar level of activity as the parent cytotoxic compound C1. This is the first substitutionally inert cytotoxic metal complex to be used as a light‐triggered prodrug candidate. Light, ruthenium, anticancer action! Modifying substitutionally inert [Ru(dppz)2(CppH)]2+ to become a 3‐(4,5‐dimethoxy‐2‐nitrophenyl)‐2‐butyl ester renders it inactive to both cancerous (HeLa and U2OS) and non‐cancerous (MRC‐5) cells. Cytotoxic effects of the complex can be unleashed upon illumination. CppH=2‐(2‐pyridyl)pyrimidine‐4‐carboxylic acid; dppz=dipyrido[3,2‐a:2′,3′‐c]phenazine.
    Subject(s): ruthenium ; medicinal inorganic chemistry ; prodrugs ; substitutionally inert complexes ; photolysis ; Cell Line ; Cell Survival - drug effects ; Antineoplastic Agents - chemical synthesis ; Humans ; Prodrugs - chemistry ; Antineoplastic Agents - chemistry ; Coordination Complexes - chemistry ; Ruthenium - chemistry ; Pyrimidines - chemistry ; Photolysis ; Carboxylic Acids - chemistry ; Coordination Complexes - chemical synthesis ; Coordination Complexes - pharmacology ; Prodrugs - chemical synthesis ; Antineoplastic Agents - pharmacology ; HeLa Cells ; Prodrugs - pharmacology ; Index Medicus
    ISSN: 1433-7851
    E-ISSN: 1521-3773
    Source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
    Source: © ProQuest LLC All rights reserved〈img src="https://exlibris-pub.s3.amazonaws.com/PQ_Logo.jpg" style="vertical-align:middle;margin-left:7px"〉
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 6
    Language: English
    In: Scientific reports, 2017-03-10, Vol.7 (1), p.142-12
    Description: Human corneal endothelial cells (HCEnCs) are responsible for maintaining the transparency of the cornea. Damaged or diseased HCEnCs may cause blindness. Replacement of the diseased cells with a healthy donor endothelium is the only currently available treatment. Tissue-engineering can serve as an alternative to conventional donor corneal transplantation. Due to the global shortage of donor corneas, a wide interest in the development of cultured graft substitutes and artificial corneas has increased. Availability of the old donor corneas is higher especially for research. Although it can be proposed as a valuable source for cell culture, its less proliferative capability emerges a challenge for the researchers. This article describes the use of hyaluronic acid (HA) in combination with Rho-kinase inhibitor (ROCK) Y-27632 for the cultivation of HCEnCs from older donor corneas (age 〉 60 years). Four conditions including and excluding HA + ROCK and its effect on early attachment rates and proliferation was studied on forty-eight corneas. It was observed that HCEnCs reach confluence within 10-15 days when cultured with HA + ROCK. This approach improves the efficiency of cell adhesion due to force attachment. HCEnCs from old donor corneas can be cultured using this method which may further lead to cell-based therapy for treating corneal endothelial dysfunction.
    Subject(s): Amides - pharmacology ; Corneal Transplantation ; Endothelium, Corneal - cytology ; Humans ; Middle Aged ; Hyaluronic Acid - pharmacology ; Male ; Endothelium, Corneal - drug effects ; Cell Adhesion - drug effects ; Cell Culture Techniques - methods ; Female ; Aged ; Cell Proliferation - drug effects ; Pyridines - pharmacology ; Tissue Donors ; Tissue Engineering ; Cell culture ; Cornea ; Blindness ; Cell adhesion ; Transplantation ; Hyaluronic acid ; Endothelial cells ; Rho-associated kinase ; Endothelium ; Cell adhesion & migration ; Index Medicus
    ISSN: 2045-2322
    E-ISSN: 2045-2322
    Source: Nature Open Access
    Source: Academic Search Ultimate
    Source: PubMed Central
    Source: © ProQuest LLC All rights reserved〈img src="https://exlibris-pub.s3.amazonaws.com/PQ_Logo.jpg" style="vertical-align:middle;margin-left:7px"〉
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 7
    Language: English
    In: Psicoart (Bologna), 2016-04-01, Vol.6 (6)
    Description: Writing as reparation is a common defense strategy and emotion processing that belongs primarily to the private experience of the subjet, when he lives delicate and crucial moments of his life: in this case we can speak of a “Ego’s private writing” , which is typical of the diary and other modest autobiographical expressions. But the drive to repair is a constant mode, which can be found also in great literary models (Rousseau, Svevo, Proust, Kafka ...). The pleasure that the act of writing seems to bear in itself is an important and recurring element, that characterizes both these levels of writing, also in situations of pain and anguish. In my speech I will speak of this pleasure and its links with the dimension of sexuality – a “polymorphous perverse” sexuality, that not by chance characterizes essential but different seasons of our lives, such as adolescence and senility.
    Subject(s): Scrittura ; psicoanalisi ; senilità ; sessualità ; riparazione
    E-ISSN: 2038-6184
    Source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 8
    Language: English
    In: European food research & technology, 2020-01, Vol.246 (1), p.167-177
    Description: The effect of light intensity (LI) and water availability (WA) on rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis L.) plant growth, essential oil (EO) production and composition was investigated by a two-factorial field experiment, where the first factor was LI (100%, 50% or 25% of natural sunlight) and the second factor was WA (irrigation set at 85%, 70% or 55% of field capacity during plant growing). The EO obtained by steam distillation of the dried aerial part of the plant was analysed by GC/MS. Reduction of LI from 100 to 25% of natural sunlight markedly lowered plant biomass production, whereas reduction of WA from 85 to 55% had a smaller lowering effect on plant growth. High shading (25% of LI) markedly reduced EO yield on a plant basis (-43%), whereas intermediate shading (50% of LI) increased EO yield as % content of the fresh biomass (+29%) when compared to full solar radiation. WA markedly influenced EO yield, as expressed on a plant basis, but only in plants exposed to 100% LI. Moreover, changes in LI and WA seemed to have an opposite effect on the relative abundance of EO constituents that are formed through the activity of two groups of enzymes, pinene synthases ([alpha]- and [beta]-pinene, camphene and myrcene) and, respectively, bornyl diphosphate synthases (borneol, camphor and bornyl acetate). Accurate management of light conditions and water availability, in greenhouse as well as open field conditions, may allow to optimize rosemary EO yield and modulate EO profile in view of different potential uses.
    Subject(s): Production management ; Enzymes ; Essences and essential oils industry ; Camphor ; Radiation ; Esters ; Petroleum industry ; Production data
    ISSN: 1438-2377
    E-ISSN: 1438-2385
    Source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 9
    Language: English
    In: Nature medicine, 2006-12, Vol.12 (12), p.1397-1402
    Description: The continuous renewal of human epidermis is sustained by stem cells contained in the epidermal basal layer and in hair follicles. Cultured keratinocyte stem cells, known as holoclones, generate sheets of epithelium used to restore severe skin, mucosal and corneal defects. Mutations in genes encoding the basement membrane component laminin 5 (LAM5) cause junctional epidermolysis bullosa (JEB), a devastating and often fatal skin adhesion disorder. Epidermal stem cells from an adult patient affected by LAM5-β3-deficient JEB were transduced with a retroviral vector expressing LAMB3 cDNA (encoding LAM5-β3), and used to prepare genetically corrected cultured epidermal grafts. Nine grafts were transplanted onto surgically prepared regions of the patient's legs. Engraftment was complete after 8 d. Synthesis and proper assembly of normal levels of functional LAM5 were observed, together with the development of a firmly adherent epidermis that remained stable for the duration of the follow-up (1 year) in the absence of blisters, infections, inflammation or immune response. Retroviral integration site analysis indicated that the regenerated epidermis is maintained by a defined repertoire of transduced stem cells. These data show that ex vivo gene therapy of JEB is feasible and leads to full functional correction of the disease.
    Subject(s): Cell Adhesion Molecules - genetics ; Tissue Engineering - methods ; Humans ; Cells, Cultured ; Retroviridae ; Male ; Feasibility Studies ; Stem Cell Transplantation ; Epidermolysis Bullosa, Junctional - therapy ; Animals ; Adult ; Mice ; Genetic Vectors ; 3T3 Cells ; Epidermis - cytology ; Genetic Therapy - methods ; Index Medicus ; Genetic Therapy ; Cell Adhesion Molecules ; Epidermis ; Life Sciences ; Tissue Engineering ; Epidermolysis Bullosa, Junctional
    ISSN: 1078-8956
    E-ISSN: 1546-170X
    E-ISSN: 1744-7933
    Source: Single Journals
    Source: Academic Search Ultimate
    Source: Nature Journals Online
    Source: Elektronische Zeitschriftenbibliothek - Frei zugängliche E-Journals
    Source: © ProQuest LLC All rights reserved〈img src="https://exlibris-pub.s3.amazonaws.com/PQ_Logo.jpg" style="vertical-align:middle;margin-left:7px"〉
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 10
    Language: English
    In: Current genomics, 2011-06, Vol.12 (4), p.238-249
    Description: Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a group of inherited disorders affecting 1 in 3000-7000 people and characterized by abnormalities of the photoreceptors (rods and cones) or the retinal pigment epithelium of the retina which lead to progressive visual loss. RP can be inherited in an autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive or X-linked manner. While usually limited to the eye, RP may also occur as part of a syndrome as in the Usher syndrome and Bardet-Biedl syndrome. Over 40 genes have been associated with RP so far, with the majority of them expressed in either the photoreceptors or the retinal pigment epithelium. The tremendous heterogeneity of the disease makes the genetics of RP complicated, thus rendering genotype-phenotype correlations not fully applicable yet. In addition to the multiplicity of mutations, in fact, different mutations in the same gene may cause different diseases. We will here review which genes are involved in the genesis of RP and how mutations can lead to retinal degeneration. In the future, a more thorough analysis of genetic and clinical data together with a better understanding of the genotype-phenotype correlation might allow to reveal important information with respect to the likelihood of disease development and choices of therapy.
    Subject(s): Syndromic retinitis pigmentosa ; mutations ; dominant ; retina ; X-linked ; non-syndromic retinitis pigmentosa ; recessive
    ISSN: 1389-2029
    E-ISSN: 1875-5488
    Source: PubMed Central
    Source: © ProQuest LLC All rights reserved〈img src="https://exlibris-pub.s3.amazonaws.com/PQ_Logo.jpg" style="vertical-align:middle;margin-left:7px"〉
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. More information can be found here...