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  • 1
    Language: English
    In: Economic development and cultural change, 2005-10, Vol.54 (1), p.97-128
    Description: Despite the attractiveness of experiments from the perspective of program evaluation, there have been very few program experiments in the area of family planning. This article evaluates an ongoing family planning program experiment in rural Bangladesh. The article estimates the effect of mothers' program exposure on fertility and children's time allocation. The results show that while the program was effective in reducing fertility, it had no significant impact on children's school enrollment. However, the program appears to have significantly raised boys' participation in the labor force.
    Subject(s): Age ; Bangladesch ; Bildungsverhalten ; Birth control ; Child labor ; Child labor practices ; Children ; Economic conditions ; Economic development ; Employment ; Familienplanung ; Family planning ; Family planning services ; Farmlands ; Female fertility ; Fertility ; Forecasts and trends ; Fruchtbarkeit ; Impact analysis ; Labor force ; Ländlicher Raum ; Regression analysis ; School attendance ; School enrollment ; Socioeconomic factors ; Studies ; Villages ; Workforce ; Zeitallokation
    ISSN: 0013-0079
    E-ISSN: 1539-2988
    Source: International Bibliography of the Social Sciences (IBSS)
    Source: Business Source Ultimate
    Source: EconLit with Full Text
    Source: JSTOR Arts & Sciences VII
    Source: Sociological Abstracts
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  • 2
    Article
    Article
    2020
    ISSN: 0257-3032  ISSN: 1564-6971 
    Language: English
    In: The World Bank research observer, 2020-02-01, Vol.35 (1), p.87-121
    Description: In parts of Asia, the South Caucasus, and the Balkans, son preference is strong enough to trigger significant levels of sex selection, resulting in the excess mortality of girls and skewing child sex ratios in favor of boys. Every year, an estimated 1.8 million girls go “missing” because of the widespread use of sex selective practices in these regions. The pervasive use of such practices is reflective of the striking inequities girls face immediately, and it also has possible negative implications for efforts to improve women's status in the long term. Recognizing this as a public policy concern, governments have employed direct measures such as banning the use of prenatal sex selection technology, and providing financial incentives to families that have girls. This study reviews cross-country experiences to take stock of the direct interventions used and finds no conclusive evidence that they are effective in reducing the higher mortality risk for girls. In fact, bans on the use of sex selection technology may inadvertently worsen the status of the very individuals they intend to protect, and financial incentives to families with girls offer only short-term benefits at most. Instead, what seems to work are policies that indirectly raise the value of daughters. The study also underscores the paucity of causal studies in this literature.
    Subject(s): DIRECT INTERVENTION ; FINANCIAL INCENTIVE ; GENDER DISCRIMINATION ; MISSING GIRLS ; MORTALITY RISK ; SEX RATIOS ; SEX SELECTION ; SON PREFERENCE
    ISSN: 0257-3032
    ISSN: 1564-6971
    E-ISSN: 1564-6971
    Source: EconLit with Full Text
    Source: World Bank e-Library
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  • 3
    Language: English
    Description: In this dissertation, fertility and demand for contraceptives is analyzed within the non-unitary preferences framework. Husbands and wives are allowed to have differing preferences over number of children and timing of births and the impact of these differing preferences on couples' fertility and contraceptive usage is investigated. Recognizing that fertility is different from other household outcomes since couples can choose their contraceptive strategy and influence the supply of children, non-unitary preferences over number of children and timing of births is analyzed within the demand-supply framework of fertility. Data are from two fertility surveys, Bangladesh Demographic and Health Survey (1993) and Pakistan Demographic and Health Survey (1990). A useful feature of these two surveys is the availability of data on husbands and wives. The study begins by comparing data from Bangladesh and Pakistan. These two countries were in different stages of fertility transition in early 1990s. The study then proceeds by using data from Bangladesh Demographic and Health Survey to estimate whether spouses differ in their preferences over number and timing of births and how this difference influences couples' fertility and use of contraceptives. Results show that husbands and wives have differing preferences over family size and timing of births. Husbands' and wives' family size preferences appear to have equal weight in determining achieved fertility. Likelihood of contraceptive use is high when either spouse intends to stop having children. However, there is evidence of discrepancy in spousal report of contraceptive use. This is shown to be significantly associated with differing spousal fertility intentions. There are significant differences in results across cohorts. The dissertation also investigates an economic explanation of nonnumeric (Up-to-God) response to the desired family size question asked in the survey. It shows that this response is consistent with respondents' perception of a supply constraint to their fertility. This result suggests that nonnumeric response can be used to identify those who are supply constrained in a cross-section of couples, thus, overcoming one potential difficulty with estimating demand-supply models of fertility using cross-sectional data.
    Subject(s): Birth control ; Decision making ; Families & family life ; Fertility ; Individual & family studies ; Labor economics ; Personal relationships ; Sociology ; Studies
    ISBN: 9780493338156
    ISBN: 0493338152
    Source: ProQuest Dissertations & Theses Global
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