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  • 1
    Language: English
    In: The Lancet (British edition), 2007, Vol.370 (9588), p.667-675
    Description: Summary Background Individuals with diabetes are at higher risk of myocardial infarction than non-diabetics. However, much less is known about the incidence of, and risk factors for, development of diabetes and impaired fasting glucose in patients who have had a myocardial infarction. We set out to estimate this incidence and investigate whether lifestyle factors such as dietary habits might alter this risk. Methods We used prospectively obtained data for 8291 Italian patients with a myocardial infarction within the previous 3 months, who were free of diabetes (determined by medication use, a physician-reported diagnosis, or fasting glucose ≥7 mmol/L) at baseline. Incidence of new-onset diabetes (new diabetes medication or fasting glucose ≥7 mmol/L) and impaired fasting glucose (fasting glucose ≥6·1 mmol/L and 〈7 mmol/L) were assessed at follow-up at 0·5, 1·0, 1·5, 2·5, and 3·5 years. Baseline data for body-mass index (BMI), other risk factors, dietary habits, and medications were updated during follow-up. A Mediterranean diet score was assigned according to consumption of cooked and raw vegetables, fruit, fish, and olive oil. Associations of demographic, clinical, and lifestyle risk-factors with incidence of diabetes and impaired fasting glucose were assessed with multivariable Cox proportional hazards. Findings During 26 795 person-years (mean follow-up 3·2 years [SD 0·9]), 998 individuals (12%) developed new-onset diabetes (incidence 37 cases per 1000 person-years). Of the 7533 without impaired fasting glucose at baseline, 2514 (33%) developed new-onset impaired fasting glucose or diabetes (incidence 123 cases per 1000 person-years), rising to 3859 (62%) of 6229 with the lower cutoff for impaired fasting glucose of 5·6 mmol/L (incidence 321 cases per 1000 person-years). Independent risk factors for new-onset diabetes or impaired fasting glucose included older age, hypertension, use of beta-blockers, lipid-lowering medications (protective), and diuretic use. Independent lifestyle risk-factors included higher BMI, greater BMI gain during follow-up, current smoking, a lower Mediterranean dietary score, and wine consumption of more than 1 L/day. Data for physical activity were unavailable, but inability to perform exercise testing was associated with higher incidence of diabetes and impaired fasting glucose. Interpretation Compared with population-based cohorts, patients with a recent myocardial infarction had a higher annual incidence rate of impaired fasting glucose (1·8 vs 27·5% in our study) and diabetes (0·8–1·6% compared with 3·7%) in this study. Thus, our results indicate that myocardial infarction could be a prediabetes risk equivalent. Smoking cessation, prevention of weight gain, and consumption of typical Mediterranean foods might lower this risk, which emphasises the need for guidance on diet and other lifestyle factors for patients who have had a myocardial infarction.
    Subject(s): Internal Medicine ; Multivariate Analysis ; Life Style ; Glucose Intolerance - epidemiology ; Prospective Studies ; Diet, Mediterranean ; Humans ; Middle Aged ; Risk Factors ; Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - prevention & control ; Kaplan-Meier Estimate ; Proportional Hazards Models ; Male ; Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - epidemiology ; Incidence ; Myocardial Infarction - complications ; Glucose Intolerance - prevention & control ; Aged, 80 and over ; Adult ; Female ; Italy - epidemiology ; Aged ; Blood sugar monitoring ; Analysis ; Diabetes ; Research ; Health aspects ; Risk factors ; Heart attack ; Index Medicus ; Abridged Index Medicus
    ISSN: 0140-6736
    E-ISSN: 1474-547X
    Source: Backfile Package - All of Back Files EBS [ALLOFBCKF]
    Source: © ProQuest LLC All rights reserved〈img src="https://exlibris-pub.s3.amazonaws.com/PQ_Logo.jpg" style="vertical-align:middle;margin-left:7px"〉
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  • 2
    Language: English
    In: Journal of the American College of Cardiology, 2013, Vol.61 (21), p.2194-2196
    Subject(s): Cardiovascular ; Internal Medicine ; Sects ; Medical colleges ; Hospitals ; Heart beat ; Atrial fibrillation
    ISSN: 0735-1097
    E-ISSN: 1558-3597
    Source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
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  • 3
    Language: English
    In: JAMA : the journal of the American Medical Association, 2012-11-05, Vol.308 (19), p.1-11
    Description: CONTEXT Postoperative atrial fibrillation or flutter (AF) is one of the most common complications of cardiac surgery and significantly increases morbidity and health care utilization. A few small trials have evaluated whether long-chain n-3-polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) reduce postoperative AF, with mixed results. OBJECTIVE To determine whether perioperative n-3-PUFA supplementation reduces postoperative AF. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PATIENTS The Omega-3 Fatty Acids for Prevention of Post-operative Atrial Fibrillation (OPERA) double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized clinical trial. A total of 1516 patients scheduled for cardiac surgery in 28 centers in the United States, Italy, and Argentina were enrolled between August 2010 and June 2012. Inclusion criteria were broad; the main exclusions were regular use of fish oil or absence of sinus rhythm at enrollment. INTERVENTION Patients were randomized to receive fish oil (1-g capsules containing ≥840 mg n-3-PUFAs as ethyl esters) or placebo, with preoperative loading of 10 g over 3 to 5 days (or 8 g over 2 days) followed postoperatively by 2 g/d until hospital discharge or postoperative day 10, whichever came first. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE Occurrence of postoperative AF lasting longer than 30 seconds. Secondary end points were postoperative AF lasting longer than 1 hour, resulting in symptoms, or treated with cardioversion; postoperative AF excluding atrial flutter; time to first postoperative AF; number of AF episodes per patient; hospital utilization; and major adverse cardiovascular events, 30-day mortality, bleeding, and other adverse events. RESULTS At enrollment, mean age was 64 (SD, 13) years; 72.2% of patients were men, and 51.8% had planned valvular surgery. The primary end point occurred in 233 (30.7%) patients assigned to placebo and 227 (30.0%) assigned to n-3-PUFAs (odds ratio, 0.96 [95% CI, 0.77-1.20]; P = .74). None of the secondary end points were significantly different between the placebo and fish oil groups, including postoperative AF that was sustained, symptomatic, or treated (231 [30.5%] vs 224 [29.6%], P = .70) or number of postoperative AF episodes per patient (1 episode: 156 [20.6%] vs 157 [20.7%]; 2 episodes: 59 [7.8%] vs 49 [6.5%]; ≥3 episodes: 18 [2.4%] vs 21 [2.8%]) (P = .73). Supplementation with n-3-PUFAs was generally well tolerated, with no evidence for increased risk of bleeding or serious adverse events. CONCLUSION In this large multinational trial among patients undergoing cardiac surgery, perioperative supplementation with n-3-PUFAs, compared with placebo, did not reduce the risk of postoperative AF. TRIAL REGISTRATION clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00970489
    Subject(s): Cardiology. Vascular system ; Heart ; Public health. Hygiene-occupational medicine ; Public health. Hygiene ; General aspects ; Cardiac dysrhythmias ; Prevention and actions ; Biological and medical sciences ; Medical sciences ; Double-Blind Method ; Humans ; Middle Aged ; Male ; Risk ; Treatment Outcome ; Cardiovascular Surgical Procedures - adverse effects ; Fish Oils - therapeutic use ; Atrial Fibrillation - etiology ; Fatty Acids, Omega-3 - therapeutic use ; Female ; Aged ; Odds Ratio ; Dietary Supplements ; Atrial Fibrillation - prevention & control ; Care and treatment ; Usage ; Diet therapy ; Fish oils ; Atrial fibrillation ; Dietary supplements ; Management ; Health aspects ; Postoperative care ; Omega-3 fatty acids ; Index Medicus ; Abridged Index Medicus
    ISSN: 0098-7484
    E-ISSN: 1538-3598
    Source: American Medical Association Journals Backfile (through 1997)
    Source: © ProQuest LLC All rights reserved〈img src="https://exlibris-pub.s3.amazonaws.com/PQ_Logo.jpg" style="vertical-align:middle;margin-left:7px"〉
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  • 4
    Language: English
    In: Cochrane library, 2015-10-22, Vol.2015 (11), p.CD005328-CD005328
    Description: Background Knee osteoarthritis is a leading cause of chronic pain, disability, and decreased quality of life. Despite the long‐standing use of intra‐articular corticosteroids, there is an ongoing debate about their benefits and safety. This is an update of a Cochrane review first published in 2005. Objectives To determine the benefits and harms of intra‐articular corticosteroids compared with sham or no intervention in people with knee osteoarthritis in terms of pain, physical function, quality of life, and safety. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, and EMBASE (from inception to 3 February 2015), checked trial registers, conference proceedings, reference lists, and contacted authors. Selection criteria We included randomised or quasi‐randomised controlled trials that compared intra‐articular corticosteroids with sham injection or no treatment in people with knee osteoarthritis. We applied no language restrictions. Data collection and analysis We calculated standardised mean differences (SMDs) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for pain, function, quality of life, joint space narrowing, and risk ratios (RRs) for safety outcomes. We combined trials using an inverse‐variance random‐effects meta‐analysis. Main results We identified 27 trials (13 new studies) with 1767 participants in this update. We graded the quality of the evidence as 'low' for all outcomes because treatment effect estimates were inconsistent with great variation across trials, pooled estimates were imprecise and did not rule out relevant or irrelevant clinical effects, and because most trials had a high or unclear risk of bias. Intra‐articular corticosteroids appeared to be more beneficial in pain reduction than control interventions (SMD ‐0.40, 95% CI ‐0.58 to ‐0.22), which corresponds to a difference in pain scores of 1.0 cm on a 10‐cm visual analogue scale between corticosteroids and sham injection and translates into a number needed to treat for an additional beneficial outcome (NNTB) of 8 (95% CI 6 to 13). An I2 statistic of 68% indicated considerable between‐trial heterogeneity. A visual inspection of the funnel plot suggested some asymmetry (asymmetry coefficient ‐1.21, 95%CI ‐3.58 to 1.17). When stratifying results according to length of follow‐up, benefits were moderate at 1 to 2 weeks after end of treatment (SMD ‐0.48, 95% CI ‐0.70 to ‐0.27), small to moderate at 4 to 6 weeks (SMD ‐0.41, 95% CI ‐0.61 to ‐0.21), small at 13 weeks (SMD ‐0.22, 95% CI ‐0.44 to 0.00), and no evidence of an effect at 26 weeks (SMD ‐0.07, 95% CI ‐0.25 to 0.11). An I2 statistic of ≥ 63% indicated a moderate to large degree of between‐trial heterogeneity up to 13 weeks after end of treatment (P for heterogeneity≤0.001), and an I2 of 0% indicated low heterogeneity at 26 weeks (P=0.43). There was evidence of lower treatment effects in trials that randomised on average at least 50 participants per group (P=0.05) or at least 100 participants per group (P=0.013), in trials that used concomittant viscosupplementation (P=0.08), and in trials that used concomitant joint lavage (P≤0.001). Corticosteroids appeared to be more effective in function improvement than control interventions (SMD ‐0.33, 95% CI ‐0.56 to ‐0.09), which corresponds to a difference in functions scores of ‐0.7 units on standardised Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index (WOMAC) disability scale ranging from 0 to 10 and translates into a NNTB of 10 (95% CI 7 to 33). An I2 statistic of 69% indicated a moderate to large degree of between‐trial heterogeneity. A visual inspection of the funnel plot suggested asymmetry (asymmetry coefficient ‐4.07, 95% CI ‐8.08 to ‐0.05). When stratifying results according to length of follow‐up, benefits were small to moderate at 1 to 2 weeks after end of treatment (SMD ‐0.43, 95% CI ‐0.72 to ‐0.14), small to moderate at 4 to 6 weeks (SMD ‐0.36, 95% CI ‐0.63 to ‐0.09), and no evidence of an effect at 13 weeks (SMD ‐0.13, 95% CI ‐0.37 to 0.10) or at 26 weeks (SMD 0.06, 95% CI ‐0.16 to 0.28). An I2 statistic of ≥ 62% indicated a moderate to large degree of between‐trial heterogeneity up to 13 weeks after end of treatment (P for heterogeneity≤0.004), and an I2 of 0% indicated low heterogeneity at 26 weeks (P=0.52). We found evidence of lower treatment effects in trials that randomised on average at least 50 participants per group (P=0.023), in unpublished trials (P=0.023), in trials that used non‐intervention controls (P=0.031), and in trials that used concomitant viscosupplementation (P=0.06). Participants on corticosteroids were 11% less likely to experience adverse events, but confidence intervals included the null effect (RR 0.89, 95% CI 0.64 to 1.23, I2=0%). Participants on corticosteroids were 67% less likely to withdraw because of adverse events, but confidence intervals were wide and included the null effect (RR 0.33, 95% CI 0.05 to 2.07, I2=0%). Participants on corticosteroids were 27% less likely to experience any serious adverse event, but confidence intervals were wide and included the null effect (RR 0.63, 95% CI 0.15 to 2.67, I2=0%). We found no evidence of an effect of corticosteroids on quality of life compared to control (SMD ‐0.01, 95% CI ‐0.30 to 0.28, I2=0%). There was also no evidence of an effect of corticosteroids on joint space narrowing compared to control interventions (SMD ‐0.02, 95% CI ‐0.49 to 0.46). Authors' conclusions Whether there are clinically important benefits of intra‐articular corticosteroids after one to six weeks remains unclear in view of the overall quality of the evidence, considerable heterogeneity between trials, and evidence of small‐study effects. A single trial included in this review described adequate measures to minimise biases and did not find any benefit of intra‐articular corticosteroids. In this update of the systematic review and meta‐analysis, we found most of the identified trials that compared intra‐articular corticosteroids with sham or non‐intervention control small and hampered by low methodological quality. An analysis of multiple time points suggested that effects decrease over time, and our analysis provided no evidence that an effect remains six months after a corticosteroid injection.
    Subject(s): Injections, Intra‐Articular ; Hyaluronic Acid ; Adrenal Cortex Hormones ; Arthralgia ; Rheumatology ; Pharmacological treatment ; Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic ; Intra‐articular injections ; Osteoarthritis, Knee ; Treatment [Pharmacological interventions] ; Pain Measurement ; Medicine General & Introductory Medical Sciences ; Osteoarthritis ; Therapeutic Irrigation ; Arthralgia - etiology ; Hyaluronic Acid - therapeutic use ; Hyaluronic Acid - administration & dosage ; Humans ; Osteoarthritis, Knee - therapy ; Adrenal Cortex Hormones - adverse effects ; Therapeutic Irrigation - methods ; Hyaluronic Acid - analogs & derivatives ; Injections, Intra-Articular ; Hyaluronic Acid - adverse effects ; Arthralgia - drug therapy ; Osteoarthritis, Knee - drug therapy ; Adrenal Cortex Hormones - administration & dosage ; Index Medicus
    ISSN: 1465-1858
    E-ISSN: 1465-1858
    E-ISSN: 1469-493X
    Source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
    Source: Cochrane Library
    Source: © ProQuest LLC All rights reserved〈img src="https://exlibris-pub.s3.amazonaws.com/PQ_Logo.jpg" style="vertical-align:middle;margin-left:7px"〉
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  • 5
    Language: English
    In: Journal of the American College of Cardiology, 2013-05-28, Vol.61 (21), p.2194-2196
    Subject(s): Humans ; Atrial Fibrillation - etiology ; Cardiac Surgical Procedures - adverse effects ; Postoperative Care - methods ; Postoperative Complications ; Atrial Fibrillation - prevention & control ; Fish Oils - therapeutic use ; Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic ; Index Medicus ; Abridged Index Medicus
    ISSN: 0735-1097
    E-ISSN: 1558-3597
    Source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
    Source: © ProQuest LLC All rights reserved〈img src="https://exlibris-pub.s3.amazonaws.com/PQ_Logo.jpg" style="vertical-align:middle;margin-left:7px"〉
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  • 6
    Language: English
    In: BMJ : British Medical Journal, 2014-06-23, Vol.348 (jun23 8), p.g3859-g3859
    Description: Objective To investigate whether revascularisation improves prognosis compared with medical treatment among patients with stable coronary artery disease.Design Bayesian network meta-analyses to combine direct within trial comparisons between treatments with indirect evidence from other trials while maintaining randomisation. Eligibility criteria for selecting studies A strategy of initial medical treatment compared with revascularisation by coronary artery bypass grafting or Food and Drug Administration approved techniques for percutaneous revascularization: balloon angioplasty, bare metal stent, early generation paclitaxel eluting stent, sirolimus eluting stent, and zotarolimus eluting (Endeavor) stent, and new generation everolimus eluting stent, and zotarolimus eluting (Resolute) stent among patients with stable coronary artery disease.Data sources Medline and Embase from 1980 to 2013 for randomised trials comparing medical treatment with revascularisation.Main outcome measure All cause mortality.Results 100 trials in 93 553 patients with 262 090 patient years of follow-up were included. Coronary artery bypass grafting was associated with a survival benefit (rate ratio 0.80, 95% credibility interval 0.70 to 0.91) compared with medical treatment. New generation drug eluting stents (everolimus: 0.75, 0.59 to 0.96; zotarolimus (Resolute): 0.65, 0.42 to 1.00) but not balloon angioplasty (0.85, 0.68 to 1.04), bare metal stents (0.92, 0.79 to 1.05), or early generation drug eluting stents (paclitaxel: 0.92, 0.75 to 1.12; sirolimus: 0.91, 0.75 to 1.10; zotarolimus (Endeavor): 0.88, 0.69 to 1.10) were associated with improved survival compared with medical treatment. Coronary artery bypass grafting reduced the risk of myocardial infarction compared with medical treatment (0.79, 0.63 to 0.99), and everolimus eluting stents showed a trend towards a reduced risk of myocardial infarction (0.75, 0.55 to 1.01). The risk of subsequent revascularisation was noticeably reduced by coronary artery bypass grafting (0.16, 0.13 to 0.20) followed by new generation drug eluting stents (zotarolimus (Resolute): 0.26, 0.17 to 0.40; everolimus: 0.27, 0.21 to 0.35), early generation drug eluting stents (zotarolimus (Endeavor): 0.37, 0.28 to 0.50; sirolimus: 0.29, 0.24 to 0.36; paclitaxel: 0.44, 0.35 to 0.54), and bare metal stents (0.69, 0.59 to 0.81) compared with medical treatment.Conclusion Among patients with stable coronary artery disease, coronary artery bypass grafting reduces the risk of death, myocardial infarction, and subsequent revascularisation compared with medical treatment. All stent based coronary revascularisation technologies reduce the need for revascularisation to a variable degree. Our results provide evidence for improved survival with new generation drug eluting stents but no other percutaneous revascularisation technology compared with medical treatment.
    Subject(s): RESEARCH ; Coronary Artery Disease - surgery ; Myocardial Revascularization - mortality ; Humans ; Myocardial Revascularization - methods ; Survival Rate ; Treatment Outcome ; Coronary Artery Disease - drug therapy ; Coronary Artery Disease - mortality ; Index Medicus ; Abridged Index Medicus
    ISSN: 0959-8138
    ISSN: 1756-1833
    E-ISSN: 1756-1833
    E-ISSN: 1468-5833
    Source: Single Journals
    Source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
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  • 7
    Language: English
    In: European journal of preventive cardiology, 2016-06, Vol.23 (9), p.947-955
    Description: Background Although high cardiovascular risk patients should be the main target of preventive strategies, modifiable risk factors are often inadequately controlled. Aim To assess feasibility and results of a comprehensive personalized method for cardiovascular prevention in high risk patients followed by their general practitioner. Methods Between 2004 and 2007, 12,513 patients (mean age 64.0 ± 9.5 years; 61.5% males) with multiple cardiovascular risk factors or history of atherosclerotic disease were identified and followed for five years. If control of major modifiable cardiovascular risk factors (hypertension, hypercholesterolaemia, diabetes, obesity, smoking, unhealthy diet, physical inactivity) was sub-optimal, at baseline and yearly thereafter general practitioners planned with patients, with the help of a brief checklist, preventive interventions to improve the global risk profile. Main outcome was the control of the seven major modifiable cardiovascular risk factors during follow-up. Secondary outcome was the incidence of cardiovascular deaths and hospitalization for cardiovascular reasons according to the improvement in global cardiovascular risk profile during the first year. Results Control of all major modifiable risk factors except physical inactivity improved gradually and significantly (p 〈 0.0001) during follow-up. The improvement in the global cardiovascular risk profile during the first year was independently and significantly associated with a lower rate of major cardiovascular events in the following years (hazard ratio 0.939; 95% confidence interval 0.887–0.994, p = 0.03). Conclusions Our comprehensive, personalized method for cardiovascular risk prevention in people at high risk appears feasible in general practice. The improvement in the global cardiovascular risk profile was associated with a better prognosis.
    Subject(s): Double-Blind Method ; Risk Assessment ; Cardiovascular Diseases - prevention & control ; Humans ; Middle Aged ; Risk Factors ; Male ; Treatment Outcome ; Feasibility Studies ; Incidence ; Time Factors ; General Practice ; Aged, 80 and over ; Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology ; Cardiovascular Diseases - mortality ; Checklist ; Preventive Health Services ; Female ; Italy - epidemiology ; Aged ; Health Status ; Cardiovascular Diseases - diagnosis ; Precision Medicine ; Index Medicus
    ISSN: 2047-4873
    E-ISSN: 2047-4881
    Source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
    Source: © ProQuest LLC All rights reserved〈img src="https://exlibris-pub.s3.amazonaws.com/PQ_Logo.jpg" style="vertical-align:middle;margin-left:7px"〉
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  • 8
    Language: English
    In: The Lancet (British edition), 2007, Vol.370 (9588)
    Subject(s): Cardiology. Vascular system ; Heart ; General aspects ; Diabetes. Impaired glucose tolerance ; Biological and medical sciences ; Endocrinopathies ; Etiopathogenesis. Screening. Investigations. Target tissue resistance ; Medical sciences ; Coronary heart disease ; Endocrine pancreas. Apud cells (diseases)
    ISSN: 0140-6736
    E-ISSN: 1474-547X
    Source: Backfile Package - All of Back Files EBS [ALLOFBCKF]
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  • 9
    Language: English
    In: European journal of clinical investigation, 2015-02, Vol.45 (2), p.170-178
    Description: Background Postoperative atrial fibrillation (POAF) is a common complication after cardiac surgery and predicts increased morbidity and mortality. Identification of patients at high risk of POAF with the help of circulating biomarkers may enable early preventive treatment but data are limited, especially in contemporary surgical patients. Methods Plasma concentrations of N‐terminal pro‐B‐type natriuretic peptide (NT‐proBNP) and high‐sensitivity cardiac troponin T (hs‐cTnT) were measured at enrolment, on the morning of cardiac surgery, at end surgery, and 2 days postsurgery in 562 patients undergoing cardiac surgery, randomized to perioperative supplementation with oral fish oil or placebo in the Omega‐3 Fatty Acids for Prevention of Post‐Operative Atrial Fibrillation trial (OPERA). The primary endpoint was incident POAF lasting ≥ 30 s, centrally adjudicated and confirmed electrocardiographically. Results Higher levels of NT‐proBNP and hs‐cTnT before surgery were associated with older age, renal or cardiac dysfunction and EuroSCORE. NT‐proBNP peaked on postoperative day 2 (2172 [1238–3758] ng/L, median [Q1–Q3]), while hs‐cTnT peaked at the end of surgery (373 [188–660] ng/L). Fish oil supplementation did not alter the time course of the cardiac biomarkers (P 〉 0·05). Concentrations of NT‐proBNP or hs‐cTnT, on the morning of surgery, or changes in their level between morning of surgery and postsurgery, were not significantly associated with POAF after adjustment for clinical and surgical characteristics. Conclusion Among patients undergoing cardiac surgery, NT‐proBNP and hs‐cTnT are related to clinical and surgical characteristics, have different perioperative time courses but are not independently associated with risk of POAF.
    Subject(s): postoperative atrial fibrillation ; N‐terminal pro‐B‐type natriuretic peptide ; high‐sensitive cardiac troponin ; Cardiac surgery ; fish oil ; Biomarkers - metabolism ; Peptide Fragments - metabolism ; Prospective Studies ; Humans ; Middle Aged ; Natriuretic Peptide, Brain - metabolism ; Risk Factors ; Male ; Treatment Outcome ; Cardiac Surgical Procedures - adverse effects ; Preoperative Care ; Atrial Fibrillation - blood ; Troponin T - metabolism ; Postoperative Care ; Atrial Fibrillation - etiology ; Female ; Atrial Fibrillation - prevention & control ; Atrial fibrillation ; Cardiac patients ; Biological markers ; Health aspects ; Medicine, Preventive ; Fatty acids ; Natriuretic peptides ; Preventive health services ; Index Medicus
    ISSN: 0014-2972
    E-ISSN: 1365-2362
    Source: Academic Search Ultimate
    Source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
    Source: © ProQuest LLC All rights reserved〈img src="https://exlibris-pub.s3.amazonaws.com/PQ_Logo.jpg" style="vertical-align:middle;margin-left:7px"〉
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  • 10
    Language: English
    In: Journal of the American Heart Association, 2015-05-20, Vol.4 (5)
    Description: Animal study results point to oxidative stress as a key mechanism triggering postoperative atrial fibrillation (PoAF), yet the extent to which specific biomarkers of oxidative stress might relate to PoAF risk in humans remains speculative. We assessed the association of validated, fatty acid-derived oxidative stress biomarkers (F2-isoprostanes, isofurans, and F3-isoprostanes) in plasma and urine, with incident PoAF among 551 cardiac surgery patients. Biomarkers were measured at enrollment, the end of surgery, and postoperative day 2. PoAF lasting ≥30 seconds was confirmed with rhythm strip or electrocardiography and centrally adjudicated. Outcomes were assessed until hospital discharge or postoperative day 10, whichever occurred first. Urine level of each oxidative stress biomarker rose at the end of surgery (2- to 3-fold over baseline, P〈0.001) and subsequently declined to concentrations comparable to baseline by postoperative day 2. In contrast, plasma concentrations remained relatively stable throughout the perioperative course. Urine F2-isoprostanes and isofurans at the end of surgery were 20% and 50% higher in subjects who developed PoAF (P≤0.009). While baseline biomarker levels did not associate significantly with PoAF, end of surgery and postoperative day 2 isoprostanes and isofurans demonstrated relatively linear associations with PoAF. For example, the end of surgery extreme quartile multivariate adjusted OR (95% CI) for urine isofurans and F3-isoprostanes were 1.95 (1.05 to 3.62; P for trend=0.01) and 2.10 (1.04 to 2.25, P for trend=0.04), respectively. The associations of biomarkers with PoAF varied little by demographics, surgery type, and medication use (P≥0.29 for each). These novel results add to accumulating evidence supporting the likely key pathogenic role of elevated oxidative stress in PoAF. URL: Clinicaltrials.gov Unique identifier: NCT00970489.
    Subject(s): Postoperative Complications - diet therapy ; Dietary Fats, Unsaturated - therapeutic use ; F2-Isoprostanes - blood ; Oxidative Stress ; Humans ; Middle Aged ; Postoperative Complications - prevention & control ; Postoperative Period ; Male ; Treatment Outcome ; Biomarkers - blood ; Atrial Fibrillation - physiopathology ; Incidence ; Atrial Fibrillation - epidemiology ; Atrial Fibrillation - etiology ; Electrocardiography ; Fatty Acids, Omega-3 - therapeutic use ; Female ; Isoprostanes - blood ; Atrial Fibrillation - prevention & control ; Fatty Acids, Omega-3 - administration & dosage ; Index Medicus
    ISSN: 2047-9980
    E-ISSN: 2047-9980
    Source: HighWire Press (Free Journals)
    Source: PubMed Central
    Source: © ProQuest LLC All rights reserved〈img src="https://exlibris-pub.s3.amazonaws.com/PQ_Logo.jpg" style="vertical-align:middle;margin-left:7px"〉
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