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  • 1
    Book
    Book
    2020
    ISBN: 9780367492922  ISBN: 036749292X  ISBN: 0367492946  ISBN: 9780367492946  ISBN: 1003045537  ISBN: 9781003045533 
    Language: English
    In: NordSTEVA, 2020-07-08
    Description: This book compares and contrasts publicly espoused security concepts in the Nordic region, and explores the notion of societal security. Outside observers often assume that Nordic countries take similar approaches to the security and safety of their citizens. This book challenges that assumption and traces the evolution of ‘societal security’, and its broadly equivalent concepts, in Sweden, Norway, Denmark and Finland. The notion of societal security is deconstructed and analysed in terms of its different meanings and implications for each country, through both country- and issue-focused studies. Each chapter traces the evolution of key security concepts and related practices, allowing for a comparison of similarities and differences between these four countries. Using discourses and practices as evidence, this is the first book to explore how different Nordic nations have conceptualised domestic security over time. The findings will be valuable to scholars from across the geographical and theoretical spectrum, while highlighting how Nordic security discourses and practices may deviate from traditional assumptions about Nordic values. This book will be of much interest to students of security studies, Nordic politics and International Relations. Sebastian Larsson is a Researcher and Teaching Fellow in International Relations at Stockholm University, Sweden. Mark Rhinard is Professor of International Relations at Stockholm University and Senior Research Fellow at the Swedish Institute of International Affairs. Open access – no commercial reuse PART I: Introduction 1. Introduction: Comparing and Conceptualising Nordic Societal Security Sebastian Larsson and Mark Rhinard 2. Societal Security in Theory and Practice Mark Rhinard PART II: Nordic Cases 3. Swedish Total Defence and the Emergence of Societal Security Sebastian Larsson 4. The Emergence and Development of Sammfunnssikkerhet in Norway Claudia Morsut 5. Tracing the Finnish Comprehensive Security Model Vesa Valtonen and Minna Branders 6. Conceptual and Practical Changes to Security in Denmark: Expect the Unexpected, Decide the Undecidable Tobias Liebetrau PART III: Issues and Processes 7. Designing Resilience for Security in the Nordic Region: Implications for Strategy Trine Villumsen Berling and Karen Lund Petersen 8. From ‘Spiritual Defence’ to Robust Resilience in the Finnish Comprehensive Security Model Ari-Elmeri Hyvönen and Tapio Juntunen 9. Countering Radicalisation in Norwegian Terrorism Policy: A Welfare State Approach to Societal Security Sissel Haugdal Jore 10. Threats, Risks, and the (Re)turn to Territorial Security Policies in Sweden Jonatan Stiglund PART IV: Conclusions 11. Conclusion: Convergence and Divergence in Nordic Societal Securities Sebastian Larsson and Mark Rhinard 12. Epilogue: Security Without Society? J. Peter Burgess
    Subject(s): Scandinavian Politics ; Regional Security ; Security Studies - Pol & Intl Relns ; Critical Security ; Samhällsvetenskap ; societal security ; International Relations ; Social Sciences ; Other Social Sciences ; internationella relationer ; Internal Security ; Nordic ; international cooperation ; Annan samhällsvetenskap ; Statsvetenskap ; Globaliseringsstudier ; Political Science ; Globalisation Studies
    ISBN: 9780367492922
    ISBN: 036749292X
    ISBN: 0367492946
    ISBN: 9780367492946
    ISBN: 1003045537
    ISBN: 9781003045533
    Source: DOAB: Directory of Open Access Books
    Source: SWEPUB Freely available online
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  • 2
    Language: English
    In: Surveillance & society, 2017-02-28, Vol.15 (1), p.94-107
    Description: What is at stake when citizens are encouraged to deploy vigilant surveillance and report what they consider to be unusual and “suspicious” activity? This article explores the current role of vigilance in contemporary Western security practices aimed at battling terrorist acts and major crime. It does so by critically analysing official constructions of suspiciousness, the responsibilisation process of participatory policing, and the assignments of prejudiced amateur detectives. It concludes, firstly, that the agency offered by political campaigns such as “If You See Something, Say Something” is highly illusive since the act of reporting simply demarcates where participation ends, and where fear and paranoia are turned into legitimate intelligence, enabling the state to exercise authoritative action and preemptive violence. Secondly, these kinds of vigilance initiatives also nurture a normalisation of suspicion towards strangers since the encouragements to be aware of anything-and-anyone deemed “out of the ordinary”, as well as the tools for reporting such suspicions, increasingly creep into the mundane realms of everyday life.
    ISSN: 1477-7487
    E-ISSN: 1477-7487
    Source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
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  • 3
    Language: English
    In: Ecology letters, 2019-01, Vol.22 (1), p.108-118
    Description: Tephritid flies are serious fruit pests. Despite clear niche differences, many species show considerable overlap in fruit preferences, of which we here analysed the olfactory correlate. Using the volatiles of four unrelated fruit species, antennal responses were quantified to construct a fruit‐odour response database for four tephritid species. Although responses were distinct with a significant niche‐correlated bias, the analyses show that the probability of detection of a volatile strongly increased with its sharedness across fruits. This also held for the unrelated fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster (DoOR repository‐based analyses). We conjectured that shared volatiles signify ‘host’ to the fly ‘nose’ and induce attraction. Indeed, blends of volatiles shared by fruit and detected by all four species were very attractive for tephritid species, more than fruits. Quantitative whole antennal recordings en lieu of, or complementing bottom‐up molecular neurogenetic approaches, enables comparative olfactomics in non‐model species, and facilitate interpretation of olfaction in evolutionary, ecological, and applied contexts.
    Subject(s): Attractants ; volatilome ; drosophila ; electrophysiology ; polyphagy ; olfactome ; behaviour ; tephritidae ; Fruit-flies ; Analysis
    ISSN: 1461-023X
    E-ISSN: 1461-0248
    Source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
    Source: © ProQuest LLC All rights reserved〈img src="https://exlibris-pub.s3.amazonaws.com/PQ_Logo.jpg" style="vertical-align:middle;margin-left:7px"〉
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  • 4
    Language: English
    In: Scientific reports, 2021-01-29, Vol.11 (1), p.2690-14
    Description: African horticulture is seriously affected by fruit flies, both native and invasive. Novel sustainable control methods need testing against the backdrop of smallholder-dominated farming of Africa. We evaluated the potential of male-specific attractants (parapheromones) laced with insecticide to suppress the alien invasive Bactrocera dorsalis and native Ceratitis capitata. In large-scale guava, methyl-eugenol (ME)-bait stations combined with toxic protein baits suppressed B. dorsalis within 8 months but resulted in a resurgence of the displaced Ceratitis capitata. In smallholder farms, intervention using SPLAT-ME laced with spinosad was surprisingly unsuccessful. Subsequent mark-release-recapture experiments showed high dispersal rates of flies, covering many times a typical farm size, leading to a continuous influx of flies from surrounding areas. Several other factors important for intervention were evaluated. SPLAT-MAT-ME dollops remained attractive for over two weeks, although gradually becoming less attractive than fresh baits. Further, competitive displacement was observed: C. capitata selectively emerged from fruits in which B. dorsalis infestation was low. Finally, we evaluated whether ME could be combined with C. capitata male attractants [trimedlure (TML) and terpinyl acetate (TA)] without affecting attraction. Combining male lures did not affect catches directly, although at very high populations of B. dorsalis attracted to ME interfered with C. capitata trap entry. Although ME-based methods can effectively suppress B. dorsalis, they were not effective at single smallholder scale due to the high dispersive propensity of tephritids. Further, competitive release implies the need for a combination of lures and methods. These observations are important for developing control schemes tailored for African smallholder settings.
    Subject(s): Attractants ; Spinosad ; Horticulture ; Farms ; Dispersal ; Terpinyl acetate ; Acetic acid ; Eugenol
    E-ISSN: 2045-2322
    Source: Nature Open Access
    Source: Academic Search Ultimate
    Source: PubMed Central
    Source: © ProQuest LLC All rights reserved〈img src="https://exlibris-pub.s3.amazonaws.com/PQ_Logo.jpg" style="vertical-align:middle;margin-left:7px"〉
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  • 5
    Language: English
    In: Microbial ecology, 2018-10, Vol.76 (3), p.751-761
    Description: Semiochemicals released by plant-microbe associations are used by herbivorous insects to access and evaluate food resources and oviposition sites. Adult insects may utilize microbial-derived nutrients to prolong their lifespan, promote egg development, and offer a high nutritional substrate to their offspring. Here, we examined the behavioral role of semiochemicals from grape-microbe interactions on oviposition and field attraction of the grapevine moth Lobesia botrana (Denis & Schiffermüller). The volatile constituents released by grape inoculated with yeasts (Hanseniaspora uvarum (Niehaus), Metschnikowia pulcherrima (Pitt.) M.W. Miller, Pichia anomala, Saccharomyces cerevisiae Meyen ex E.C. Hansen, and Zygosaccharomyces rouxii (Boutroux) Yarrow), sour rot bacteria (Acetobacter aceti (Pasteur) Beijerinck and Gluconobacter oxydans (Henneberg) De Ley), and a fungal pathogen (Botrytis cinerea Pers.) all endemic of the vineyard were sampled by solid-phase microextraction and analyzed by gas-chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry. Ethanol, 3-methyl-1-butanol, and ethyl acetate were the most common volatiles released from all microbe-inoculated grapes. In addition, acetic acid was released at a substantial amount following bacteria inoculation and in a three-way inoculation with yeasts and the fungus. 2-phenylethanol, a compound reported to attract tortricid moths when used in combination with acetic acid, was found at a relatively low level in all microbial combinations as well as in the control grape. While grapes inoculated with a consortium of yeasts stimulated oviposition in comparison with uninoculated berries, the phytopathogenic fungus deterred egg-laying. Nonetheless, the highest preference to lay eggs was measured when the yeasts were co-inoculated with the fungus. The lowest preference was obtained when grapes were inoculated with sour rot bacteria and their binary co-inoculation with yeasts and the fungus. Interestingly, oviposition on berries simultaneously inoculated with all the three microbial groups was unaffected. Lures loaded with either acetic acid or 2-phenylethanol were not attractive when placed in traps as single component in vineyards, but a binary blend attracted both sexes of grapevine moth in significant numbers. Further addition of the three most common volatiles released by infected berries (ethanol, 3-methyl-1-butanol, and ethyl acetate) did not significantly increase moth catch with this binary blend. The ecological implications of the grape-microorganism and grapevine moth interaction as well as the possibility to develop a pest monitoring system based on microbial volatiles are discussed.
    Subject(s): Life Sciences ; 2-phenylethanol ; Microbial Ecology ; Dual sex attractant ; Nature Conservation ; Microbiology ; Geoecology/Natural Processes ; Pest monitoring ; Water Quality/Water Pollution ; Ecology ; Acetic acid ; Lobesia botrana ; Wineries ; Wine industry ; Microorganisms ; Grapes ; Analysis ; Esters ; Mass spectrometry ; Food supply ; Organic acids ; Index Medicus ; Plant Microbe Interactions ; Mikrobiologi
    ISSN: 0095-3628
    ISSN: 1432-184X
    E-ISSN: 1432-184X
    Source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
    Source: © ProQuest LLC All rights reserved〈img src="https://exlibris-pub.s3.amazonaws.com/PQ_Logo.jpg" style="vertical-align:middle;margin-left:7px"〉
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  • 6
    Language: English
    In: Scientific reports, 2020-04-16, Vol.10 (1), p.6512-6512
    Description: Sustainable, low impact control methods, including mating disruption and microbial insecticides against L. botrana have been available for decades. Yet, successful implementation has been restricted to only a few grapevine districts in the world. A limiting factor is the lack of a female attractant to either monitor or control the damaging sex. Volatile attractants for both female and male insects can be used to assess when L. botrana populations exceed economic thresholds, and to decrease the use of synthetic pesticides within both conventional and pheromone programs. Rather than using host-plant volatiles, which are readily masked by background volatiles released by the main crop, we tested the attractiveness of volatiles that signify microbial breakdown and more likely stand out against the background odour. A two-component blend of 2-phenylethanol (2-PET) and acetic acid (AA) caught significant numbers of both sexes. Catches increased with AA and, to a minimal extent, 2-PET loads. However, a higher load of 2-PET also increased bycatches, especially of Lepidoptera and Neuroptera. Major (ethanol, ethyl acetate, 3-methyl-1-butanol) or minor (esters, aldehydes, alcohols and a ketone) fermentation volatiles, did surprisingly not improve the attraction of L. botrana compared to the binary blend of 2-PET and AA alone, but strongly increased bycatches. The most attractive lure may thus not be the best choice in terms of specificity. We suggest that future research papers always disclose all bycatches to permit evaluation of lures in terms of sustainability.
    Subject(s): Pest Control ; Species Specificity ; Humans ; Lepidoptera - physiology ; Sex Attractants - chemistry ; Acetic Acid - pharmacology ; Male ; Acetic Acid - chemistry ; Pheromones - metabolism ; Lepidoptera - pathogenicity ; Sex Attractants - pharmacology ; Odorants ; Phenylethyl Alcohol - pharmacology ; Volatile Organic Compounds - pharmacology ; Animals ; Pesticides - chemistry ; Female ; Pheromones - antagonists & inhibitors ; Lepidoptera - drug effects ; Volatile Organic Compounds - chemistry ; Sexual Behavior, Animal - drug effects ; Pesticides - pharmacology ; Vitis - parasitology ; Phenylethyl Alcohol - chemistry ; Ethanol ; Mating disruption ; Esters ; Ethyl acetate ; Insecticides ; Fermentation ; Aldehydes ; Volatiles ; Alcohols ; Attractants ; Isopentyl alcohol ; Host plants ; Butanol ; Acetic acid ; Positron emission tomography ; Odor ; Index Medicus ; Agricultural Science ; Jordbruksvetenskap
    ISSN: 2045-2322
    E-ISSN: 2045-2322
    Source: Nature Open Access
    Source: Academic Search Ultimate
    Source: PubMed Central
    Source: © ProQuest LLC All rights reserved〈img src="https://exlibris-pub.s3.amazonaws.com/PQ_Logo.jpg" style="vertical-align:middle;margin-left:7px"〉
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  • 7
    Language: English
    In: Pest management science, 2019-06, Vol.75 (6), p.1671-1680
    Description: BACKGROUND Small‐scale farmers often take a double hit from pests such as tephritid fruit‐flies. The high price of products against fruit‐flies, together with the higher risk of reinfestation from neighboring orchards, limits options for control. Therefore, management requires low‐cost local products and concerted action. Peach production in central Bolivia is increasingly affected by invasive Ceratitis capitata. To provide locally sustainable techniques that could incentivize area‐wide cooperation of growers, we tested efficiency and specificity of low‐cost lures and traps compared with commercial lures and traps (Tephritrap). RESULTS In the laboratory, the local fermented beverage ‘chicha’ and baker's yeast were equally or more attractive than commercial lures. Both chicha and baker's yeast trapped more flies in field (average FTD 10.31 and 9.49), whereas commercially hydrolyzed protein lure (4.71) or Torula yeast (6.82). However, many non‐target species were caught (57.3% and 53.4%). Of the six PET bottles‐based traps used, the T‐trap caught a similar number of flies (average FTD 5.55), but fewer beneficial insects (0.16) compared to the Tephritrap (0.92). CONCLUSIONS This study provides fruit growers with an economical and effective method to capture large numbers of C. capitata, suitable to be part of integrated pest management programs for fruit fly control. © 2018 Society of Chemical Industry Innovative low‐cost alternatives for fruit growers. This article describes successful development of locally available lures and traps, suitable for integrated pest management (IPM) strategies against Ceratitis capitata (Wiedemann) in Bolivia.
    Subject(s): traps ; Ceratitis capitata ; integrated pest management ; medfly ; attractants ; invasive species ; yeast ; Chemical industry ; Herbicides ; Pesticides industry ; Control ; Sustainable agriculture ; Mediterranean fruit-fly ; Plastic containers
    ISSN: 1526-498X
    E-ISSN: 1526-4998
    Source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
    Source: © ProQuest LLC All rights reserved〈img src="https://exlibris-pub.s3.amazonaws.com/PQ_Logo.jpg" style="vertical-align:middle;margin-left:7px"〉
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  • 8
    Language: English
    In: International political sociology, 2020-09-01, Vol.14 (3), p.323-344
    Description: Abstract This collective discussion proposes a novel understanding of intelligence as a social phenomenon, taking place in a social space that increasingly involves actors and professional fields not immediately seen as part of intelligence. This discussion is a response to the inherent functionalism in Intelligence Studies (IS) that conceives of intelligence as a cycle serving policymakers. Instead, our interventions seek to problematize and break with this notion of the cycle and show what an alternative study of intelligence would look like. In the first part of the discussion, we situate our intervention in the broader fields of IS and International Political Sociology. Espousing a transdisciplinary approach, we build our four interventions as transversal lines cutting through a social space in which agents with differing stakes participate and reframe the meaning and practice of intelligence. Intelligence professionals not only have to reckon with policymakers, but also increasingly with law enforcement agents, representatives from the science and technology sector, judges, lawyers, activists, and Internet users themselves. Each move takes a step further away from the intelligence cycle by introducing new empirical sites, actors, and stakes.
    ISSN: 1749-5679
    E-ISSN: 1749-5687
    Source: Oxford Journals 2016 Current Collection
    Source: Oxford Journals A-Z Collection
    Source: Oxford Journals 2017 Religion Collection
    Source: Oxford Journals 2017 Current Collection
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  • 9
    Book
    Book
    2021
    ISBN: 036749292X  ISBN: 9780367492922 
    Language: English
    Description: "This book compares and contrasts publicly espoused security concepts in the Nordic region, and explores the notion of societal security. Outside observers often assume that Nordic countries take similar approaches to the security and safety of their citizens. This book challenges that assumption and traces the evolution of ‘societal security’, and its broadly equivalent concepts, in Sweden, Norway, Denmark and Finland. The notion of societal security is deconstructed and analysed in terms of its different meanings and implications for each country, through both country- and issue-focused studies. Each chapter traces the evolution of key security concepts and related practices, allowing for a comparison of similarities and differences between these four countries. Using discourses and practices as evidence, this is the first book to explore how different Nordic nations have conceptualised domestic security over time. The findings will be valuable to scholars from across the geographical and theoretical spectrum, while highlighting how Nordic security discourses and practices may deviate from traditional assumptions about Nordic values. This book will be of much interest to students of security studies, Nordic politics and International Relations."
    Subject(s): Larsson ; divergence ; security ; access ; convergence ; Nordic ; Mark ; Rhinard ; societal ; open ; Sebastian
    ISBN: 036749292X
    ISBN: 9780367492922
    Source: DOAB: Directory of Open Access Books
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  • 10
    Language: English
    In: Insects (Basel, Switzerland), 2018-09-14, Vol.9 (3), p.119
    Description: Tephritid fruit flies require protein for sexual and gonotrophic development. Food-based lures are therefore widely used in strategies to detect and control fruit flies in the Tephritidae family. However, these baits are attractive to a broad range of insect species. We therefore sought to identify volatiles detected by the fly antennae, with the goal to compose lures that more specifically target tephritids. Using gas chromatography-coupled electroantennographic detection (GC-EAD) we screened for antennal responses of four important tephritid species to volatile compounds from five commercially available protein-based baits. Antennal active compounds were reconstituted in synthetic blends for each species and used in behavioral assays. These species-based blends were attractive in olfactometer experiments, as was a blend composed of all antennally active compounds from all the four species we observed (tested only in , Hendel). Pilot field tests indicate that the blends need to be further evaluated and optimized under field conditions.
    Subject(s): electrophysiology ; behavior ; Tephritidae ; food-baits ; olfactometer ; Bactrocera dorsalis
    ISSN: 2075-4450
    E-ISSN: 2075-4450
    Source: Academic Search Ultimate
    Source: PubMed Central
    Source: ProQuest Central
    Source: © ProQuest LLC All rights reserved〈img src="https://exlibris-pub.s3.amazonaws.com/PQ_Logo.jpg" style="vertical-align:middle;margin-left:7px"〉
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