placeholder
and
and

Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Export
Filter
Document type
Language
Year
  • 1
    Language: English
    In: PloS one, 2015, Vol.10 (9), p.e0138964-e0138964
    Description: Sustained lung inflations (SLI) during neonatal resuscitation may promote alveolar recruitment in preterm infants. While most of the studies focus on respiratory outcome, the impact of SLI on the brain hasn't been investigated yet. Do SLI affect cerebral blood volume (CBV) in preterm infants? Preterm infants of gestation 28 weeks 0 days to 33 weeks 6 days with requirement for respiratory support (RS) were included in this randomized controlled pilot trial. Within the first 15 minutes after birth near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) measurements using 'NIRO-200-NX' (Hamamatsu, Japan) were performed to evaluate changes in CBV and cerebral tissue oxygenation. Two groups were compared based on RS: In SLI group RS was given by applying 1-3 SLI (30 cmH2O for 15 s) continued by respiratory standard care. Control group received respiratory standard care only. 40 infants (20 in each group) with mean gestational age of 32 weeks one day (±2 days) and birth weight of 1707 (±470) g were included. In the control group ΔCBV was significantly decreasing, whereas in SLI group ΔCBV showed similar values during the whole period of 15 minutes. Comparing both groups within the first 15 minutes ΔCBV showed a tendency toward different overall courses (p = 0.051). This is the first study demonstrating an impact of SLI on CBV. Further studies are warranted including reconfirmation of the present findings in infants with lower gestational age. Future investigations on SLI should not only focus on respiratory outcome but also on the consequences on the developing brain. German Clinical Trials Register DRKS00005161 https://drks-neu.uniklinik-freiburg.de/drks_web/setLocale_EN.do.
    Subject(s): Alveoli ; Archives & records ; Birth weight ; Blood ; Blood Volume ; Brain ; Brain - blood supply ; Brain - metabolism ; Brain research ; Cerebral blood flow ; Clinical trials ; Gestation ; Gestational age ; Health aspects ; Humans ; I.R. radiation ; Infant, Newborn ; Infant, Premature ; Infants ; Infants (Premature) ; Inflation (Finance) ; Infrared spectra ; Infrared spectroscopy ; Japan ; Life assessment ; Lung - physiopathology ; Lungs ; Medical research ; Near infrared radiation ; Neonates ; Newborn babies ; Oxygen - metabolism ; Oxygen Inhalation Therapy - methods ; Oxygenation ; Pediatrics ; Physiology ; Pilot Projects ; Randomization ; Research ; Respiration ; Respiration, Artificial - methods ; Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Newborn - physiopathology ; Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Newborn - therapy ; Resuscitation ; Studies ; Usage ; Ventilators
    ISSN: 1932-6203
    E-ISSN: 1932-6203
    Source: Academic Search Ultimate
    Source: PubMed Central
    Source: DOAJ Directory of Open Access Journals - Not for CDI Discovery
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    Language: English
    In: Archives of disease in childhood. Fetal and neonatal edition, 2015-09, Vol.100 (5), p.F422-F427
    Description: ObjectivesTo investigate the occurrence of peri/intraventricular haemorrhage (P/IVH) in preterm infants and its potential association with cerebral regional oxygen saturation (crSO2) during the immediate transition.MethodsIn this two-centre prospective observational cohort study, crSO2 was measured with near-infrared spectroscopy in preterm infants (〈32 weeks of gestational age) during the immediate neonatal transition (15 min). In addition, arterial oxygen saturation (SpO2) and heart rate (HR) were monitored with pulse oximetry. Cranial ultrasound scans were performed on day 4, day 7 and day 14 after birth and before discharge. Neonates with IVH of any grade (IVH group) were matched to the neonates without IVH (Non-IVH group) on gestational age (±1 week) and birth weight (±100 g). The duration and magnitude of deviation from the 10th centile in crSO2 during immediate transition was analysed and expressed in %minutes.ResultsIVH was found in 12 of the included neonates, who were matched to 12 neonates without IVH. There was no difference in SpO2 and HR between these two groups. The duration and magnitude of centiles-deviation of crSO2 was significantly pronounced in the IVH group compared with the Non-IVH group (1870%min vs 456%min).ConclusionsThe neonates of the IVH group showed significantly lower crSO2 values during the immediate transition, although there was no difference concerning SpO2 and HR. The additional monitoring of crSO2 during the immediate transition could reveal neonates with higher risk of developing an IVH later in the course.
    Subject(s): Abridged Index Medicus ; Birth weight ; Blood pressure ; Brain ; Brain - metabolism ; Care and treatment ; Cerebral Hemorrhage - metabolism ; Cerebrovascular Circulation ; Health aspects ; Heart Rate ; Hemorrhage ; Humans ; Hypoxia ; Infant, Newborn ; Infant, Premature ; Infant, Premature, Diseases - metabolism ; Infants (Premature) ; Intensive care ; Ischemia ; Monitoring, Physiologic - methods ; Oximetry ; Oxygen ; Oxygen - blood ; Oxygen Consumption ; Oxygen therapy ; Premature birth ; Prospective Studies ; Risk factors ; Spectroscopy, Near-Infrared ; Spectrum analysis ; Traumatic brain injury ; Ultrasonic imaging ; Usage ; Ventilation
    ISSN: 1359-2998
    E-ISSN: 1468-2052
    Source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 3
    Language: English
    In: Frontiers in pediatrics, 2021-08-13, Vol.9, p.710465-710465
    Description: Fetal hemoglobin (HbF) is a principal oxygen carrier in the blood of preterm and term neonates. Compared to adult hemoglobin, it has a significantly higher affinity for oxygen and its oxyhemoglobin dissociation curve (ODC) is left-shifted accordingly. Tissue oxygenation measured with near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) during neonatal intensive care is directly affected by hemoglobin concentration. We performed a systematic qualitative review regarding the impact of HbF on tissue oxygenation monitoring by NIRS. The PubMed/Medline, EMBASE, Cochrane library and CINAHL databases were searched from inception to May 2021 for studies relating to HbF and NIRS in preterm and term neonates in the first days and weeks after birth. Out of 1,429 eligible records, four observational studies were included. Three studies found no effect of HbF on cerebral tissue oxygenation. One peripheral NIRS study found a positive correlation between HbF and peripheral fractional oxygen extraction (FOE). Currently available limited data suggest that FHbF could affect peripheral muscle FOE, but seems not to affect cerebral oxygenation in preterm neonates. More studies are needed to draw a final conclusion on this matter, especially concerning the oxygenation changes driven by adult RBC transfusions.
    Subject(s): cerebral tissue oxygenation ; fetal hemoglobin ; fractional oxygen extraction ; near infrared spectroscopy ; newborn
    ISSN: 2296-2360
    E-ISSN: 2296-2360
    Source: PubMed Central
    Source: DOAJ Directory of Open Access Journals - Not for CDI Discovery
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 4
    Language: English
    In: Acta Paediatrica, 2020-11, Vol.109 (11), p.2299-2301
    Subject(s): Brief Report ; Cerebrovascular Circulation ; Humans ; Infant, Newborn ; Infant, Premature ; preterm infants ; regional cerebal oxygenation ; Regular and Brief Reports ; resistance index ; Ultrasonography, Doppler
    ISSN: 0803-5253
    E-ISSN: 1651-2227
    Source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 5
    Language: English
    In: Neonatology (Basel, Switzerland), 2015-11, Vol.108 (4), p.283-286
    Description: Background: Non-invasive monitoring of the brain with near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) during immediate transition after birth is of growing interest. Objective: The aim of this work was to define reference ranges and centile charts for a regional cerebral tissue oxygenation index (cTOI), measured with the NIRO 200NX (NIRO, Hamamatsu, Japan), and cerebral fractional tissue oxygen extraction (cFTOE) during the first 15 min after birth in preterm and term neonates without any medical support. Methods: cTOI was measured with the NIRO 200NX during the first 15 min after delivery via Caesarean section in preterm and term infants. The NIRS-sensor was placed on the right forehead. Peripheral arterial oxygen saturation (SpO2) and heart rate were continuously measured by pulse oximetry. cFTOE was calculated out of cTOI and SpO2. Neonates with a requirement for any medical support were excluded. Results: A total of 230 neonates were enrolled, from which 90 had to be excluded. Therefore, 140 term neonates were included and data were used to define reference ranges and centile charts. The 50th centile (10th to 90th centiles) of cTOI was 56% (39-75) at 2 min, 66% (50-78) at 5 min, 75% (62-85) at 10 min and 73% (61-84) at 15 min after birth. The 50th centile of cFTOE was 0.24 (0.11-0.44) at 2 min, 0.20 (0.10-0.35) at 5 min, 0.21 (0.09-0.35) at 10 min and 0.24 (0.13-0.37) at 15 min after birth. Conclusion: The present observational study adds the reference ranges and centile charts of cTOI measured with the NIRO 200NX and cFTOE calculated out of cTOI and SpO2 in neonates during the immediate neonatal transition. Centiles for each instrument will be necessary for future clinical application, since the differences between cTOI and cerebral regional tissue oxygen saturation measured with INVOS 5100C change with increasing regional oxygenation.
    Subject(s): Blood Gas Analysis ; Brain - blood supply ; Cerebral circulation ; Cerebrovascular Circulation - physiology ; Cesarean Section ; Female ; Health aspects ; Heart Rate ; Hemodynamic monitoring ; Humans ; Infant, Newborn ; Infants (Newborn) ; Japan ; Medical examination ; Methods ; Near infrared spectroscopy ; Oximetry ; Oximetry - instrumentation ; Oxygen - analysis ; Pediatric research ; Physiological aspects ; Pregnancy ; Prospective Studies ; Reference Values ; Short Communication ; Spectroscopy, Near-Infrared ; Term Birth - physiology ; Usage
    ISSN: 1661-7800
    E-ISSN: 1661-7819
    Source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 6
    Language: English
    In: The Journal of pediatrics, 2015, Vol.170, p.73-78.e4
    Description: Objective To assess if monitoring of cerebral regional tissue oxygen saturation (crSO2 ) using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) to guide respiratory and supplemental oxygen support reduces burden of cerebral hypoxia and hyperoxia in preterm neonates during resuscitation after birth. Study design Preterm neonates 〈34+0  weeks of gestation were included in a prospective randomized controlled pilot feasibility study at 2 tertiary level neonatal intensive care units. In a NIRS-visible group, crSO2 monitoring in addition to pulse oximetry was used to guide respiratory and supplemental oxygen support during the first 15 minutes after birth. In a NIRS-not-visible group, only pulse oximetry was used. The primary outcomes were burden of cerebral hypoxia (〈10th percentile) or hyperoxia (〉90th percentile) measured in %minutes crSO2 during the first 15 minutes after birth. Secondary outcomes were all cause of mortality and/or cerebral injury and neurologic outcome at term age. Allocation sequence was 1:1 with block-randomization of 30 preterm neonates at each site. Results In the NIRS-visible group burden of cerebral hypoxia in %minutes, crSO2 was halved, and the relative reduction was 55.4% (95% CI 37.6-73.2%; P  = .028). Cerebral hyperoxia was observed in NIRS-visible group in 3 neonates with supplemental oxygen and in NIRS-not-visible group in 2. Cerebral injury rate and neurologic outcome at term age was similar in both groups. Two neonates died in the NIRS-not-visible group and none in the NIRS-visible group. No severe adverse reactions were observed. Conclusions Reduction of burden of cerebral hypoxia during immediate transition and resuscitation after birth is feasible by crSO2 monitoring to guide respiratory and supplemental oxygen support. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov : NCT02017691.
    Subject(s): Abridged Index Medicus ; Cerebrovascular Circulation - physiology ; Feasibility Studies ; Female ; Humans ; Hyperoxia - blood ; Hyperoxia - prevention & control ; Hypoxia, Brain - blood ; Hypoxia, Brain - prevention & control ; Infant ; Infant Mortality ; Infant, Newborn ; Infant, Premature ; Infants (Premature) ; Intensive Care Units, Neonatal ; Male ; Medical informatics ; Monitoring, Physiologic - methods ; Mortality ; Oximetry - methods ; Oxygen - blood ; Oxygen Inhalation Therapy ; Pediatrics ; Pilot Projects ; Prospective Studies ; Resuscitation ; Spectroscopy, Near-Infrared ; Time Factors
    ISSN: 0022-3476
    E-ISSN: 1097-6833
    Source: Backfile Package - All of Back Files EBS [ALLOFBCKF]
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 7
    Language: English
    In: Frontiers in pediatrics, 2020-09-18, Vol.8, p.571285-571285
    Description: Introduction: Emergency vascular access is rarely required during neonatal resuscitation. We aimed to analyze frequency of use, success, and complication rates of intraosseous (IO) vascular access in neonates at a single tertiary neonatal intensive care unit.Method: We performed a questionnaire-based survey among pediatric residents, pediatricians, and neonatologists, asking for the use of IO access in neonates between April 1st, 2015, and April 30th, 2020. We then reviewed electronic patient charts of all identified neonates for demographic data as well as indications and complications of IO puncture.Results: All 41 questionnaires were answered. Nine physicians had attempted IO access 15 times in a total of 12 neonates. Among them were eight term neonates, three preterm neonates, and one former extreme preterm neonate at a post-menstrual age of 42 weeks (m:f = 6:6). The overall success rate was 75%. IO access was attempted primarily during post-natal resuscitation (11/12 neonates, 91.7%) and after unsuccessful peripheral venous puncture (8/12 neonates, 66.7%). It was used to administer adrenaline, fluid and/or blood, and emergency sedation after intubation. Minor short-term complications were reported in three of nine successful IO punctures (33.3%).Discussion: Over the study period of 61 months, IO access was rarely attempted during neonatal resuscitation. Our success rate was lower than reported elsewhere, suggesting that IO puncture may be more challenging in neonates than in older infants and children. No severe short-term complications occurred.
    Subject(s): Infants (Newborn) ; intraosseous access ; intraosseous emergency infusion ; Neonatal intensive care ; neonate ; resuscitation ; Usage ; vascular access
    ISSN: 2296-2360
    E-ISSN: 2296-2360
    Source: PubMed Central
    Source: DOAJ Directory of Open Access Journals - Not for CDI Discovery
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 8
    Language: English
    In: Children (Basel), 2021-10-02, Vol.8 (10), p.882
    Description: Premature infants born after less than 25 weeks’ gestation are particularly vulnerable at birth and stabilization in the delivery room (DR) is challenging. After birth, infants born after 〈25 weeks’ gestation develop respiratory and hemodynamic instability due to their immature physiology and anatomy. Successful stabilization at birth has the potential to reduce morbidities and mortalities, while suboptimal DR care could increase long-term sequelae. This article reviews current neonatal resuscitation guidelines and addresses challenges during DR stabilization in extremely premature infants born after 〈25 weeks’ gestation at the threshold of viability.
    Subject(s): active management ; Birth weight ; Blood ; Carotid arteries ; Decision making ; Gestational age ; Larynx ; Morbidity ; Pediatrics ; postnatal stabilization ; Premature babies ; Premature birth ; respiratory support ; threshold of viability ; Umbilical cord ; umbilical cord management ; Veins & arteries
    ISSN: 2227-9067
    E-ISSN: 2227-9067
    Source: PubMed Central
    Source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 9
    Language: English
    In: Children (Basel), 2021-04-30, Vol.8 (5), p.361
    Description: Continuous monitoring of arterial oxygen saturation by pulse oximetry (SpO2) is the main method to guide respiratory and oxygen support in neonates during postnatal stabilization and after admission to neonatal intensive care unit. The accuracy of these devices is therefore crucial. The presence of fetal hemoglobin (HbF) in neonatal blood might affect SpO2 readings. We performed a systematic qualitative review to investigate the impact of HbF on SpO2 accuracy in neonates. PubMed/Medline, Embase, Cumulative Index to Nursing & Allied Health database (CINAHL) and Cochrane library databases were searched from inception to January 2021 for human studies in the English language, which compared arterial oxygen saturations (SaO2) from neonatal blood with SpO2 readings and included HbF measurements in their reports. Ten observational studies were included. Eight studies reported SpO2-SaO2 bias that ranged from -3.6%, standard deviation (SD) 2.3%, to +4.2% (SD 2.4). However, it remains unclear to what extent this depends on HbF. Five studies showed that an increase in HbF changes the relation of partial oxygen pressure (paO2) to SpO2, which is physiologically explained by the leftward shift in oxygen dissociation curve. It is important to be aware of this shift when treating a neonate, especially for the lower SpO2 limits in preterm neonates to avoid undetected hypoxia.
    Subject(s): Adults ; Bias ; Childrens health ; fetal hemoglobin ; Hemoglobin ; Methods ; neonate ; Oxygen saturation ; oxygen saturation monitoring ; Pediatrics ; Pulse oximetry ; Spectrum analysis ; Systematic review
    ISSN: 2227-9067
    E-ISSN: 2227-9067
    Source: PubMed Central
    Source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 10
    Language: English
    In: Acta Paediatrica, 2018-06, Vol.107 (6), p.952-957
    Description: Aim This study analysed tactile stimulation during neonatal transition and resuscitation in preterm and term neonates born by Caesarean delivery. It examined the frequency, location and body region, duration and possible effects of stimulation on heart rate and arterial oxygen saturation (SpO2). Methods Two independent investigators analysed video recordings of tactile stimulation on term and preterm neonates during neonatal transition from January 2012 to December 2014. They were recorded during a prospective observational study and randomised controlled trial at a tertiary centre, the Medical University of Graz, Austria. SpO2 and heart rate were continuously recorded. Data on the frequency, body region and duration of stimulation were collected. To investigate the possible effects of stimulation, SpO2 and heart rate were compared before and after stimulation. Results Term infants received tactile stimulation more than once, and it tended to start later, last longer and be applied in more locations than in preterm infants. Only preterm infants showed a significant increase in SpO2 after stimulation and heart rates did not show any significant changes in either group. Conclusion Tactile stimulation was applied in different ways to preterm and term infants during neonatal transition and SpO2 showed a significant increase in preterm infants.
    Subject(s): Cesarean section ; Heart beat ; Infants (Newborn) ; Neonatal resuscitation ; Neonatal transition ; Preterm infants ; Tactile stimulation ; Term infants
    ISSN: 0803-5253
    E-ISSN: 1651-2227
    Source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. More information can be found here...