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  • 1
    Language: English
    In: Studies in higher education (Dorchester-on-Thames), 2017-05-04, Vol.42 (5), p.911-924
    Description: The scholarly literature in higher education has not dealt extensively with the responsibilities of institutions for servicing the rights of international students. This paper is a comparative analysis of legal frameworks which guide institutions in their handling of international student rights. Two national approaches, those of Australia and New Zealand, are used as a comparative analysis from which implications are drawn for institutions in other countries. The comparison indicates increasing legalism in higher education, though more law does not necessarily coincide with better rights for students. Also indicated is the importance of institutions providing more and better information to students on rights. More generally the analysis implores institutions to form, and work with, a critical understanding of the law and policy agendas of governments.
    Subject(s): international education ; higher education institutions ; international student rights ; Australia and New Zealand ; international students ; Legal responsibility ; Student rights ; International education ; International students ; University students ; Higher education ; Educational institutions ; University administration ; Comparative analysis
    ISSN: 0307-5079
    E-ISSN: 1470-174X
    Source: Academic Search Ultimate
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  • 2
    Language: English
    In: The Australian journal of social issues, 2018-01-01, Vol.53 (1), p.71-82
    Description: The global market in international education has grown almost without interruption over several decades. Increases in international student enrolments in Australia have been among the most impressive in the world, though they declined between 2010 and 2013. The decline was attributable to exchange rate movements and changes to student visa regulations, though an additional factor lay in reputational fallout from a series of violent physical attacks on Indian students, mostly in 2009. In response, Australian federal and State governments undertook diplomatic trips to India, established a raft of public inquiries to investigate the broader question of international student welfare, and made policy changes. Utilising the literature on public policy "crises", this paper presents government responses to the 2010-2013 downturn in terms of managing a "long-shadow crisis" (Boin et al., The Politics of Crisis Management: Public Leadership Under Pressure; Cambridge University Press, 2005), which typically emerges quickly but has major political consequences, is only seen to be resolved incrementally, and calls for policy change rather than fine-tuning in response. The adequacy of the policy response to the crisis is not discussed. The article suggests that the crisis and the response acted to elevate the status of international education as an area of policy in general, though not as a mainstream area of social policy.
    Subject(s): Economic aspects ; Crisis management ; International education ; Education ; Politics and government ; international education ; crisis management ; policy crises ; international student welfare ; international education policy ; Studies ; Social policy ; Leadership ; Crises ; Education policy ; Public policy ; Government policy ; Foreign students
    ISSN: 0157-6321
    E-ISSN: 1839-4655
    Source: Academic Search Ultimate
    Source: Wiley Online Library All Journals
    Source: Sociological Abstracts
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  • 3
    Language: English
    In: Sociology (Oxford), 2019-12, Vol.53 (6), p.1043-1060
    Description: Social networks play an important role in helping people find employment, yet extant studies have argued that unemployed ‘job-seekers’ rarely engage in ‘networking’ behaviours. Previous explanations of this inactivity have typically focused on individual factors such as personality, knowledge and attitude, or suggested that isolation occurs because individuals lose access to the latent benefits of employment. Social stigma has been obscured in these debates, even as they have perpetuated stereotypes regarding individual responsibility for unemployment and the inherent value of paid work. Drawing on in-depth interviews with 80 unemployed Australians, this article argues that stigma-related shame is an important factor in networking decisions. First, it demonstrates that stigma is ubiquitous in the lives of the unemployed. Second, it identifies withdrawal from social networks and disassociation from ‘the unemployed’ as two key strategies that unemployed people use to manage stigma-related shame, and shows how these strategies reduce networking activities.
    Subject(s): Sociology ; Social Sciences ; Individual responsibility ; Networking ; Social isolation ; Stigma ; Employment ; Shame ; Social networks ; Personality ; Stereotypes ; Responsibility ; Unemployment ; Unemployed people
    ISSN: 0038-0385
    E-ISSN: 1469-8684
    Source: International Bibliography of the Social Sciences (IBSS)
    Source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
    Source: Web of Science - Social Sciences Citation Index – 2019〈img src="http://exlibris-pub.s3.amazonaws.com/fromwos-v2.jpg" /〉
    Source: Sociological Abstracts
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  • 4
    Language: English
    In: Journal of studies in international education, 2008-12-01, Vol.12 (2), p.148-180
    Description: In a study of international student security, consisting of 200 intensive interviews with students, resident onshore in Australia, it was found that two thirds of the group had experienced problems of loneliness and/or isolation, especially in the early months. According to Weiss, students experience both personal loneliness because of the loss of contact with families and social loneliness because of the loss of networks. Both forms of loneliness are at times exacerbated by their experiences in institutional sites. The article discusses the coping mechanisms that students use. It identifies a third kind of loneliness experienced by international students, cultural loneliness, triggered by the absence of the preferred cultural and/or linguistic environment. This can affect even students with adequate personal and social support. Thus, same-culture networks are often crucial for international students. Yet same-culture networks are not a universal panacea: They cannot substitute for adequate pastoral care by universities or ensure satisfactory engagement with local cultures, so some causes of cultural loneliness often remain. The article concludes that the creation of stronger bonds between international and local students in the educational setting, helping international students to remake their own cultural maps on their own terms, is key to a forward move on loneliness. [Author abstract]
    Subject(s): Study abroad ; International students ; Social isolation ; Cultural interrelationships ; Loneliness ; Social networks ; Cultural isolation ; Coping ; Cultural differences ; Student welfare ; Student adjustment ; Interviews
    ISSN: 1028-3153
    E-ISSN: 1552-7808
    Source: International Bibliography of the Social Sciences (IBSS)
    Source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
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  • 5
    Language: English
    In: Social policy & administration, 2020-09, Vol.54 (5), p.765-776
    Description: Employment services are commonly provided in network settings, but it is rare to find social policy analyses of how unemployed people search for jobs through networks. In a germinal analysis of social networks and employment, Mark Granovetter argued that “weak ties” (less familiar contacts) are more important to finding employment than are “strong ties” (family and friends). This is because weak ties provide more novel job‐relevant information. Scholarship since Granovetter has predominantly supported the opposite argument, namely, that strong ties are more important for the unemployed, because they are more plentiful and thus provide more information in aggregate. Findings are also generally coloured by the focus being on “informal” networks or personal contacts. “Formal” networks, as represented most cogently by employment service providers, are absent or underestimated in most social network studies. On the basis of a qualitative study of 80 long‐term unemployed people in Australia, incorporating analysis of both informal and formal networks, we argue that although “strong informal” ties are vital to job search, it is also important to consider “weak formal” ties, which can be complementary if and where service organizations are able to supply positive case management experiences.
    Subject(s): case managers ; job search ; employment services ; networks ; strong and weak ties ; formal and informal ties ; Case managers ; Social network analysis ; Case management ; Friends ; Delivery systems ; Employment agencies ; Work experience ; Social networks ; Policy networks ; Job search ; Social policy ; Employment ; Unemployed people
    ISSN: 0144-5596
    E-ISSN: 1467-9515
    Source: International Bibliography of the Social Sciences (IBSS)
    Source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
    Source: Sociological Abstracts
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  • 6
    Language: English
    In: Work, employment and society, 2019-10, Vol.33 (5), p.794-811
    Description: Contemporary governments employ a range of policy tools to ‘activate’ the unemployed to look for work. Framing unemployment as a consequence of personal shortcoming, these policies incentivise the unemployed to become ‘productive’ members of society. While Foucault’s governmentality framework has been used to foreground the operation of power within these policies, ‘job-seeker’ resistance has received less attention. In particular, forms of emotional resistance have rarely been studied. Drawing on in-depth interviews with 80 unemployed welfare recipients in Australia, this article shows that many unemployed people internalise activation’s discourses of personal failure, experiencing shame and worthlessness as a result. It also reveals, however, that a significant minority reject this framing and the ‘feeling rules’ it implies, expressing not shame but anger regarding their circumstances. Bringing together insights from resistance studies and the sociology of emotions, this article argues that ‘job-seeker’ anger should be recognised as an important form of ‘everyday resistance’.
    Subject(s): Anger ; Welfare recipients ; Compliance ; Sociology of emotions ; Shame ; Framing ; Unemployment ; Emotions ; Personal failure ; Resistance ; Foucauldian analysis ; Welfare ; Discourses ; Governmentality ; Unemployed people ; Power
    ISSN: 0950-0170
    E-ISSN: 1469-8722
    Source: International Bibliography of the Social Sciences (IBSS)
    Source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
    Source: Sociological Abstracts
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  • 7
    Language: English
    In: Asia Pacific viewpoint, 2018-04, Vol.59 (1), p.87-91
    Description: Migration in one form or another has always been a part of human existence, but the politics that surround migration have shifted over time. The institutional actors involved in regulating the flow of migrants have increased in number and become more diverse. There is also greater awareness of the various fields of policy that directly or indirectly interact with migration.
    Subject(s): Regulation ; Politics ; Migrants ; Social regulation ; Migration ; Transnationalism
    ISSN: 1360-7456
    E-ISSN: 1467-8373
    Source: International Bibliography of the Social Sciences (IBSS)
    Source: Business Source Ultimate
    Source: Academic Search Ultimate
    Source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
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  • 8
    Language: English
    In: Higher education, 2021-01-18, p.1-15
    Description: Crises affect international students' overseas experiences, but crisis theory is rarely considered in international education studies. This article provides a comparative study of two countries, using a 'most similar cases' research design, to analyse host-nation government responses to crisis situations. The two countries are Australia and New Zealand. The crisis in each case relates to racial discrimination and violence against international students. The article finds that Australia and New Zealand each had a 'long-shadow crisis'. Yet, Australia's governmental response was more systematic and comprehensive, mainly because of the formation of a pro-action 'advocacy coalition' which was formed in the context of a federal political system. The article discusses key implications for international education studies, highlighting that governmental structures matter in crisis response, and that crisis theory is important to interpreting policy challenges, especially in the era of COVID-19.
    E-ISSN: 1573-174X
    Source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
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  • 9
    Book
    Book
    2020
    ISBN: 303042054X  ISBN: 9783030420543 
    Language: English
    Description: This open access book examines the comparative evolution of social protection in Australia and New Zealand from 1890 to the present day, focusing on the relationship between employment relations and social policy. Utilising longstanding and more recent developments in historical institutionalist methodology, Ramia investigates the relationship between these two policy domains in the context of social protection theory. He argues that treating employment relations as dynamic, and as inextricably intertwined with changes in the welfare state over time, allows for more accurate portrayal of similarity and difference in social protection. The book will be of most interest to researchers, advanced undergraduate and postgraduate students in social policy, employment relations, public policy, social and political history, and comparative politics.
    Subject(s): Political Sociology ; Social & ethical issues ; social harm ; Politics & government ; labour market ; Sociology: work & labour ; the free market ; Political economy ; employment and welfare ; Sociology ; Sociology of Work ; Social Policy ; industrial relations ; Open access
    ISBN: 303042054X
    ISBN: 9783030420543
    Source: OAPEN
    Source: DOAB: Directory of Open Access Books
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  • 10
    Language: English
    In: Mobilities, 2019-09-03, Vol.14 (5), p.596-611
    Description: The mobility and agency of the unemployed have rarely been examined together in welfare administration. Mobility research has much to offer the (im)mobility of low-skilled and unemployed workers. The article begins by critically examining dominant public discourse and policy reforms that stigmatise the assumed immobility of the unemployed. Drawing on empirical data from in-depth interviews with people on income support payments in Australia, it then offers a critical view on the mobility decision-making processes of these job-seekers. Building on previous research concerning the politics of mobility, it shows that structural inequalities impact mobility choices, making relocation difficult for many job-seekers. At the same time, it highlights the localised mobility that job search now involves, complicating orthodox associations between mobility and power - as well as assumptions that job-seekers are immobile.
    Subject(s): Mobility ; unemployment ; immobility ; Australia ; welfare conditionality ; income support ; Geography ; Social Sciences ; Technology ; Transportation ; Science & Technology ; Job search ; Payments ; Decision making ; Employment ; Relocation
    ISSN: 1745-0101
    E-ISSN: 1745-011X
    Source: Taylor & Francis Open Access
    Source: Academic Search Ultimate
    Source: Web of Science - Social Sciences Citation Index – 2019〈img src="http://exlibris-pub.s3.amazonaws.com/fromwos-v2.jpg" /〉
    Source: Sociological Abstracts
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