placeholder
and
and

Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Export
Filter
Language
Year
  • 1
    Language: English
    In: Case reports in critical care, 2019-10-30, Vol.2019, p.1-3
    Description: Neonatal herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection is a life-threatening infection with high morbidity and mortality rates. Neonatal herpes, most commonly due to HSV type 2, is a multi-system disease; however, initial pulmonary presentation is extremely unusual. We describe an infant presenting with progressive respiratory distress, which was the dominant clinical feature of HSV infection during the first days of life. Sepsis work-up and antibiotic treatment were immediately initiated; however, antiviral treatment was not given until the infant’s death. HSV type 1 was isolated in nasopharyngeal and endotracheal aspirates. HSV pneumonia should be considered in a newborn with respiratory deterioration not compatible with common neonatal respiratory diseases.
    Subject(s): Biochemistry ; Blood tests ; Case Report ; Enzymes ; Herpes viruses ; Infections ; Infectious diseases ; Laboratories ; Liver ; Mortality ; Pediatrics ; Pneumonia ; Proteins ; Sepsis ; Urine ; Ventilators
    ISSN: 2090-6420
    E-ISSN: 2090-6439
    Source: Academic Search Ultimate
    Source: PubMed Central
    Source: DOAJ Directory of Open Access Journals - Not for CDI Discovery
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    Language: English
    In: Acta Paediatrica, 2018-01, Vol.107 (1), p.174-174
    Description: Byline: Berndt Urlesberger, Gerhard Pichler
    Subject(s): Analysis ; Cerebrovascular Circulation ; Humans ; Infant ; Infant, Newborn ; Infant, Premature ; Infants (Premature) ; Infrared spectroscopy ; Intensive Care, Neonatal ; Spectroscopy, Near-Infrared
    ISSN: 0803-5253
    E-ISSN: 1651-2227
    Source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 3
    Language: English
    In: BMJ : British Medical Journal, 2015-01-05, Vol.350 (jan05 2), p.g7635-g7635
    Description: Objective To determine if it is possible to stabilise the cerebral oxygenation of extremely preterm infants monitored by cerebral near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) oximetry.Design Phase II randomised, single blinded, parallel clinical trial.Setting Eight tertiary neonatal intensive care units in eight European countries.Participants 166 extremely preterm infants born before 28 weeks of gestation: 86 were randomised to cerebral NIRS monitoring and 80 to blinded NIRS monitoring. The only exclusion criterion was a decision not to provide life support.Interventions Monitoring of cerebral oxygenation using NIRS in combination with a dedicated treatment guideline during the first 72 hours of life (experimental) compared with blinded NIRS oxygenation monitoring with standard care (control).Main outcome measures The primary outcome measure was the time spent outside the target range of 55-85% for cerebral oxygenation multiplied by the mean absolute deviation, expressed in %hours (burden of hypoxia and hyperoxia). One hour with an oxygenation of 50% gives 5%hours of hypoxia. Secondary outcomes were all cause mortality at term equivalent age and a brain injury score assessed by cerebral ultrasonography.Randomisation Allocation sequence 1:1 with block sizes 4 and 6 in random order concealed for the investigators. The allocation was stratified for gestational age (〈26 weeks or ≥26 weeks).Blinding Cerebral oxygenation measurements were blinded in the control group. All outcome assessors were blinded to group allocation.Results The 86 infants randomised to the NIRS group had a median burden of hypoxia and hyperoxia of 36.1%hours (interquartile range 9.2-79.5%hours) compared with 81.3 (38.5-181.3) %hours in the control group, a reduction of 58% (95% confidence interval 35% to 73%, P〈0.001). In the experimental group the median burden of hypoxia was 16.6 (interquartile range 5.4-68.1) %hours, compared with 53.6 (17.4-171.3) %hours in the control group (P=0.0012). The median burden of hyperoxia was similar between the groups: 1.2 (interquartile range 0.3-9.6) %hours in the experimental group compared with 1.1 (0.1-23.4) %hours in the control group (P=0.98). We found no statistically significant differences between the two groups at term corrected age. No severe adverse reactions were associated with the device.Conclusions Cerebral oxygenation was stabilised in extremely preterm infants using a dedicated treatment guideline in combination with cerebral NIRS monitoring.Trial registration ClinicalTrial.gov NCT01590316.
    Subject(s): Abridged Index Medicus ; Brain - blood supply ; Cerebrovascular Circulation ; Clinical Protocols ; Europe ; Guideline Adherence ; Humans ; Hypoxia - diagnosis ; Hypoxia - pathology ; Infant, Extremely Premature ; Infant, Newborn ; Intensive Care Units, Neonatal ; Intensive Care, Neonatal ; Monitoring, Physiologic - methods ; Oximetry - methods ; Practice Guidelines as Topic ; RESEARCH ; Spectroscopy, Near-Infrared - methods ; Time Factors ; Treatment Outcome
    ISSN: 0959-8138
    ISSN: 1756-1833
    E-ISSN: 1756-1833
    Source: JSTOR Life Sciences
    Source: Single Journals
    Source: BMJ Journals - NESLi2
    Source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
    Source: Get It Now
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 4
    Language: English
    In: BMJ : British Medical Journal, 2013-10-17, Vol.347 (oct17 3), p.e1069-f5980
    Description: Objective To assess the role of nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) initiated at birth for prevention of death and bronchopulmonary dysplasia in very preterm infants.Design Systematic review.Data sources PubMed, Embase, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and online Pediatric Academic Society abstracts from the year of inception to June 2013.Eligibility criteria for selecting studies Randomised controlled trials evaluating the effect of nasal CPAP compared with intubation in preterm infants born at less than 32 weeks’ gestation and presenting the outcomes of either death or bronchopulmonary dysplasia, or both (defined as the need for oxygen support or mechanical ventilation at 36 weeks corrected gestation), during hospital stay.Results Four randomised controlled trials (2782 participants) met the inclusion criteria, with 1296 infants in the nasal CPAP group and 1486 in the intubation group. All the trials reported bronchopulmonary dysplasia independently at 36 weeks corrected gestation, with borderline significance in favour of the nasal CPAP group (relative risk 0.91, 95% confidence interval 0.82 to 1.01, risk difference −0.03, 95% confidence interval −0.07 to 0.01). No difference in death was observed (relative risk 0.88, 0.68 to 1.14, risk difference −0.02, −0.04 to 0.01, respectively). Pooled analysis showed a significant benefit for the combined outcome of death or bronchopulmonary dysplasia, or both, at 36 weeks corrected gestation for babies treated with nasal CPAP (relative risk 0.91, 0.84 to 0.99, risk difference −0.04, -0.07 to 0.00), number needed to treat of 25).Conclusion One additional infant could survive to 36 weeks without bronchopulmonary dysplasia for every 25 babies treated with nasal CPAP in the delivery room rather than being intubated.
    Subject(s): Abridged Index Medicus ; Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia - mortality ; Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia - physiopathology ; Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia - therapy ; Continuous Positive Airway Pressure - methods ; Female ; Humans ; Infant, Extremely Premature ; Infant, Newborn ; Male ; Oximetry ; Oxygen Inhalation Therapy - methods ; Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic ; Respiration, Artificial - methods ; Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Newborn - mortality ; Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Newborn - physiopathology ; Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Newborn - therapy
    ISSN: 0959-8138
    ISSN: 1756-1833
    E-ISSN: 1756-1833
    Source: JSTOR Life Sciences
    Source: Single Journals
    Source: BMJ Journals - NESLi2
    Source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
    Source: Get It Now
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 5
    Language: English
    In: The Journal of pediatrics, 2013, Vol.163 (6), p.1558-1563
    Description: Objective To define reference ranges for regional cerebral tissue oxygen saturation (crSO2 ) and regional cerebral fractional tissue oxygen extraction (cFTOE) during the first 15 minutes after birth in neonates requiring no medical support. Study design The crSO2 was measured using near infrared spectroscopy (Invos 5100 cerebral/somatic oximeter monitor; Somanetics Corp, Troy, Michigan) during the first 15 minutes after birth for term and preterm neonates. The near infrared spectroscopy sensor was placed on the left forehead. Peripheral oxygen saturation and heart rate were continuously measured by pulse oximetry, and cFTOE was calculated. Neonates were excluded if they required any medical support. Results A total of 381 neonates were included: 82 term neonates after vaginal delivery, 272 term neonates after cesarean delivery, and 27 preterm neonates after cesarean delivery. In all neonates, median (10th-90th percentiles) crSO2 was 41% (23-64) at 2 minutes, 68% (45-85) at 5 minutes, 79% (65-90) at 10 minutes, and 77% (63-89) at 15 minutes of age. In all neonates, median (10th-90th percentiles) cFTOE was 33% (11-70) at 2 minutes, 21% (6-45) at 5 minutes, 15% (5-31) at 10 minutes, and 18% (7-34) at 15 minutes of age. Conclusion We report reference ranges of crSO2 and cFTOE in neonates requiring no medical support during transition immediately after birth. The use of cerebral oxygenation monitoring and use of these reference ranges in neonates during transition may help to guide oxygen delivery and avoid cerebral hypo-oxygenation and hyperoxygenation.
    Subject(s): Abridged Index Medicus ; Brain - metabolism ; Humans ; Infant, Newborn ; Infants (Newborn) ; Medical informatics ; Monitoring, Physiologic - methods ; Oxygen - analysis ; Oxygen - metabolism ; Pediatrics ; Prospective Studies ; Reference Values ; Spectroscopy, Near-Infrared ; Time Factors
    ISSN: 0022-3476
    E-ISSN: 1097-6833
    Source: Backfile Package - All of Back Files EBS [ALLOFBCKF]
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 6
    Language: English
    In: PloS one, 2015, Vol.10 (9), p.e0138964-e0138964
    Description: Sustained lung inflations (SLI) during neonatal resuscitation may promote alveolar recruitment in preterm infants. While most of the studies focus on respiratory outcome, the impact of SLI on the brain hasn't been investigated yet. Do SLI affect cerebral blood volume (CBV) in preterm infants? Preterm infants of gestation 28 weeks 0 days to 33 weeks 6 days with requirement for respiratory support (RS) were included in this randomized controlled pilot trial. Within the first 15 minutes after birth near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) measurements using 'NIRO-200-NX' (Hamamatsu, Japan) were performed to evaluate changes in CBV and cerebral tissue oxygenation. Two groups were compared based on RS: In SLI group RS was given by applying 1-3 SLI (30 cmH2O for 15 s) continued by respiratory standard care. Control group received respiratory standard care only. 40 infants (20 in each group) with mean gestational age of 32 weeks one day (±2 days) and birth weight of 1707 (±470) g were included. In the control group ΔCBV was significantly decreasing, whereas in SLI group ΔCBV showed similar values during the whole period of 15 minutes. Comparing both groups within the first 15 minutes ΔCBV showed a tendency toward different overall courses (p = 0.051). This is the first study demonstrating an impact of SLI on CBV. Further studies are warranted including reconfirmation of the present findings in infants with lower gestational age. Future investigations on SLI should not only focus on respiratory outcome but also on the consequences on the developing brain. German Clinical Trials Register DRKS00005161 https://drks-neu.uniklinik-freiburg.de/drks_web/setLocale_EN.do.
    Subject(s): Alveoli ; Archives & records ; Birth weight ; Blood ; Blood Volume ; Brain ; Brain - blood supply ; Brain - metabolism ; Brain research ; Cerebral blood flow ; Clinical trials ; Gestation ; Gestational age ; Health aspects ; Humans ; I.R. radiation ; Infant, Newborn ; Infant, Premature ; Infants ; Infants (Premature) ; Inflation (Finance) ; Infrared spectra ; Infrared spectroscopy ; Japan ; Life assessment ; Lung - physiopathology ; Lungs ; Medical research ; Near infrared radiation ; Neonates ; Newborn babies ; Oxygen - metabolism ; Oxygen Inhalation Therapy - methods ; Oxygenation ; Pediatrics ; Physiology ; Pilot Projects ; Randomization ; Research ; Respiration ; Respiration, Artificial - methods ; Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Newborn - physiopathology ; Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Newborn - therapy ; Resuscitation ; Studies ; Usage ; Ventilators
    ISSN: 1932-6203
    E-ISSN: 1932-6203
    Source: Academic Search Ultimate
    Source: PubMed Central
    Source: DOAJ Directory of Open Access Journals - Not for CDI Discovery
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 7
    Language: English
    In: Archives of disease in childhood. Fetal and neonatal edition, 2015-07, Vol.100 (4), p.F361-F368
    Description: ContextSustained inflation (SI) has been advocated as an alternative to intermittent positive pressure ventilation (IPPV) during the resuscitation of neonates at birth, to facilitate the early development of an effective functional residual capacity, reduce atelectotrauma and improve oxygenation after the birth of preterm infants.ObjectiveThe primary aim was to review the available literature on the use of SI compared with IPPV at birth in preterm infants for major neonatal outcomes, including bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) and death.Data sourceMEDLINE, EMBASE and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, until 6 October 2014.Study selectionRandomised clinical trials comparing the effects of SI with IPPV at birth in preterm infants for neonatal outcomes.Data extraction and synthesisDescriptive and quantitative information was extracted; data were pooled using a random effects model. Heterogeneity was assessed using the Q statistic and I2.ResultsPooled analysis showed significant reduction in the need for mechanical ventilation within 72 h after birth (relative risk (RR) 0.87 (0.77 to 0.97), absolute risk reduction (ARR) −0.10 (−0.17 to −0.03), number needed to treat 10) in preterm infants treated with an initial SI compared with IPPV. However, significantly more infants treated with SI received treatment for patent ductus arteriosus (RR 1.27 (1.05 to 1.54), ARR 0.10 (0.03 to 0.16), number needed to harm 10). There were no differences in BPD, death at the latest follow-up and the combined outcome of death or BPD among survivors between the groups.ConclusionsCompared with IPPV, preterm infants initially treated with SI at birth required less mechanical ventilation with no improvement in the rate of BPD and/or death. The use of SI should be restricted to randomised trials until future studies demonstrate the efficacy and safety of this lung aeration manoeuvre.
    Subject(s): Abridged Index Medicus ; Bias ; Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia - etiology ; Childbirth ; Data collection ; Health aspects ; Humans ; Infant, Newborn ; Infant, Premature ; Infants (Newborn) ; Insufflation - adverse effects ; Insufflation - methods ; Intermittent Positive-Pressure Ventilation - adverse effects ; Intermittent Positive-Pressure Ventilation - methods ; Intubation ; Meta-analysis ; Mortality ; Positive pressure respiration ; Positive-Pressure Respiration - adverse effects ; Positive-Pressure Respiration - methods ; Premature birth ; Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic ; Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Newborn - mortality ; Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Newborn - therapy ; Studies ; Surfactants ; Survival Analysis ; Usage ; Ventilation
    ISSN: 1359-2998
    E-ISSN: 1468-2052
    Source: Hellenic Academic Libraries Link
    Source: BMJ Journals - NESLi2
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 8
    Language: English
    In: Archives of disease in childhood. Fetal and neonatal edition, 2015-09, Vol.100 (5), p.F422-F427
    Description: ObjectivesTo investigate the occurrence of peri/intraventricular haemorrhage (P/IVH) in preterm infants and its potential association with cerebral regional oxygen saturation (crSO2) during the immediate transition.MethodsIn this two-centre prospective observational cohort study, crSO2 was measured with near-infrared spectroscopy in preterm infants (〈32 weeks of gestational age) during the immediate neonatal transition (15 min). In addition, arterial oxygen saturation (SpO2) and heart rate (HR) were monitored with pulse oximetry. Cranial ultrasound scans were performed on day 4, day 7 and day 14 after birth and before discharge. Neonates with IVH of any grade (IVH group) were matched to the neonates without IVH (Non-IVH group) on gestational age (±1 week) and birth weight (±100 g). The duration and magnitude of deviation from the 10th centile in crSO2 during immediate transition was analysed and expressed in %minutes.ResultsIVH was found in 12 of the included neonates, who were matched to 12 neonates without IVH. There was no difference in SpO2 and HR between these two groups. The duration and magnitude of centiles-deviation of crSO2 was significantly pronounced in the IVH group compared with the Non-IVH group (1870%min vs 456%min).ConclusionsThe neonates of the IVH group showed significantly lower crSO2 values during the immediate transition, although there was no difference concerning SpO2 and HR. The additional monitoring of crSO2 during the immediate transition could reveal neonates with higher risk of developing an IVH later in the course.
    Subject(s): Abridged Index Medicus ; Birth weight ; Blood pressure ; Brain ; Brain - metabolism ; Care and treatment ; Cerebral Hemorrhage - metabolism ; Cerebrovascular Circulation ; Health aspects ; Heart Rate ; Hemorrhage ; Humans ; Hypoxia ; Infant, Newborn ; Infant, Premature ; Infant, Premature, Diseases - metabolism ; Infants (Premature) ; Intensive care ; Ischemia ; Monitoring, Physiologic - methods ; Oximetry ; Oxygen ; Oxygen - blood ; Oxygen Consumption ; Oxygen therapy ; Premature birth ; Prospective Studies ; Risk factors ; Spectroscopy, Near-Infrared ; Spectrum analysis ; Traumatic brain injury ; Ultrasonic imaging ; Usage ; Ventilation
    ISSN: 1359-2998
    E-ISSN: 1468-2052
    Source: Hellenic Academic Libraries Link
    Source: BMJ Journals - NESLi2
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 9
    Language: English
    In: Neonatology (Basel, Switzerland), 2015-11, Vol.108 (4), p.283-286
    Description: Background: Non-invasive monitoring of the brain with near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) during immediate transition after birth is of growing interest. Objective: The aim of this work was to define reference ranges and centile charts for a regional cerebral tissue oxygenation index (cTOI), measured with the NIRO 200NX (NIRO, Hamamatsu, Japan), and cerebral fractional tissue oxygen extraction (cFTOE) during the first 15 min after birth in preterm and term neonates without any medical support. Methods: cTOI was measured with the NIRO 200NX during the first 15 min after delivery via Caesarean section in preterm and term infants. The NIRS-sensor was placed on the right forehead. Peripheral arterial oxygen saturation (SpO2) and heart rate were continuously measured by pulse oximetry. cFTOE was calculated out of cTOI and SpO2. Neonates with a requirement for any medical support were excluded. Results: A total of 230 neonates were enrolled, from which 90 had to be excluded. Therefore, 140 term neonates were included and data were used to define reference ranges and centile charts. The 50th centile (10th to 90th centiles) of cTOI was 56% (39-75) at 2 min, 66% (50-78) at 5 min, 75% (62-85) at 10 min and 73% (61-84) at 15 min after birth. The 50th centile of cFTOE was 0.24 (0.11-0.44) at 2 min, 0.20 (0.10-0.35) at 5 min, 0.21 (0.09-0.35) at 10 min and 0.24 (0.13-0.37) at 15 min after birth. Conclusion: The present observational study adds the reference ranges and centile charts of cTOI measured with the NIRO 200NX and cFTOE calculated out of cTOI and SpO2 in neonates during the immediate neonatal transition. Centiles for each instrument will be necessary for future clinical application, since the differences between cTOI and cerebral regional tissue oxygen saturation measured with INVOS 5100C change with increasing regional oxygenation.
    Subject(s): Blood Gas Analysis ; Brain - blood supply ; Cerebral circulation ; Cerebrovascular Circulation - physiology ; Cesarean Section ; Female ; Health aspects ; Heart Rate ; Hemodynamic monitoring ; Humans ; Infant, Newborn ; Infants (Newborn) ; Japan ; Medical examination ; Methods ; Near infrared spectroscopy ; Oximetry ; Oximetry - instrumentation ; Oxygen - analysis ; Pediatric research ; Physiological aspects ; Pregnancy ; Prospective Studies ; Reference Values ; Short Communication ; Spectroscopy, Near-Infrared ; Term Birth - physiology ; Usage
    ISSN: 1661-7800
    E-ISSN: 1661-7819
    Source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 10
    Language: English
    In: The Journal of pediatrics, 2015, Vol.170, p.73-78.e4
    Description: Objective To assess if monitoring of cerebral regional tissue oxygen saturation (crSO2 ) using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) to guide respiratory and supplemental oxygen support reduces burden of cerebral hypoxia and hyperoxia in preterm neonates during resuscitation after birth. Study design Preterm neonates 〈34+0  weeks of gestation were included in a prospective randomized controlled pilot feasibility study at 2 tertiary level neonatal intensive care units. In a NIRS-visible group, crSO2 monitoring in addition to pulse oximetry was used to guide respiratory and supplemental oxygen support during the first 15 minutes after birth. In a NIRS-not-visible group, only pulse oximetry was used. The primary outcomes were burden of cerebral hypoxia (〈10th percentile) or hyperoxia (〉90th percentile) measured in %minutes crSO2 during the first 15 minutes after birth. Secondary outcomes were all cause of mortality and/or cerebral injury and neurologic outcome at term age. Allocation sequence was 1:1 with block-randomization of 30 preterm neonates at each site. Results In the NIRS-visible group burden of cerebral hypoxia in %minutes, crSO2 was halved, and the relative reduction was 55.4% (95% CI 37.6-73.2%; P  = .028). Cerebral hyperoxia was observed in NIRS-visible group in 3 neonates with supplemental oxygen and in NIRS-not-visible group in 2. Cerebral injury rate and neurologic outcome at term age was similar in both groups. Two neonates died in the NIRS-not-visible group and none in the NIRS-visible group. No severe adverse reactions were observed. Conclusions Reduction of burden of cerebral hypoxia during immediate transition and resuscitation after birth is feasible by crSO2 monitoring to guide respiratory and supplemental oxygen support. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov : NCT02017691.
    Subject(s): Abridged Index Medicus ; Cerebrovascular Circulation - physiology ; Feasibility Studies ; Female ; Humans ; Hyperoxia - blood ; Hyperoxia - prevention & control ; Hypoxia, Brain - blood ; Hypoxia, Brain - prevention & control ; Infant ; Infant Mortality ; Infant, Newborn ; Infant, Premature ; Infants (Premature) ; Intensive Care Units, Neonatal ; Male ; Medical informatics ; Monitoring, Physiologic - methods ; Mortality ; Oximetry - methods ; Oxygen - blood ; Oxygen Inhalation Therapy ; Pediatrics ; Pilot Projects ; Prospective Studies ; Resuscitation ; Spectroscopy, Near-Infrared ; Time Factors
    ISSN: 0022-3476
    E-ISSN: 1097-6833
    Source: Backfile Package - All of Back Files EBS [ALLOFBCKF]
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. More information can be found here...