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  • 1
    Language: English
    In: Journal of the American College of Cardiology, 2014, Vol.64 (11), p.1143-1177
    Subject(s): Cardiovascular ; Internal Medicine ; Death, Sudden, Cardiac - prevention & control ; Clinical Trials as Topic ; Decision Trees ; Defibrillators, Implantable - standards ; Humans ; Medical colleges ; Usage ; Defibrillators ; Implants, Artificial ; Prosthesis ; Clinical trials ; Jewish schools ; Index Medicus ; Abridged Index Medicus
    ISSN: 0735-1097
    E-ISSN: 1558-3597
    Source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
    Source: © ProQuest LLC All rights reserved〈img src="https://exlibris-pub.s3.amazonaws.com/PQ_Logo.jpg" style="vertical-align:middle;margin-left:7px"〉
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  • 2
    Language: English
    In: The American journal of cardiology, 2011-04-01, Vol.107 (7), p.1019-1022
    Description: Dronedarone is a multi-channel-blocking drug for the treatment of patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) or atrial flutter (AFL) with rate- and rhythm-controlling properties. A Placebo-Controlled, Double-Blind, Parallel Arm Trial to Assess the Efficacy of Dronedarone 400 mg b.i.d. for the Prevention of Cardiovascular Hospitalization or Death from Any Cause in Patients With Atrial Fibrillation/Atrial Flutter (ATHENA) demonstrated that dronedarone reduced the risk for first cardiovascular hospitalization or death from any cause. The aim of this post hoc analysis was to evaluate the rhythm- and rate-controlling properties of dronedarone in the ATHENA trial. Patients were randomized to dronedarone 400 mg twice daily (n = 2,301) or placebo (n = 2,327). Electrocardiographic tracings were classified for AF or AFL or sinus rhythm. Patients with AF or AFL on every postbaseline electrocardiogram were classified as having permanent AF or AFL. All electrical cardioversions were documented. The use of rate-controlling medications was equally distributed in the 2 treatment groups. The median time to first AF or AFL recurrence of patients in sinus rhythm at baseline was 498 days in placebo patients and 737 days in dronedarone patients (hazard ratio 0.749, 95% confidence interval 0.681 to 0.824, p 〈0.001). In the dronedarone group, 339 patients (15%) had ≥1 electrical cardioversion, compared to 481 (21%) in the placebo group (hazard ratio 0.684, 95% confidence interval 0.596 to 0.786, p 〈0.001). The likelihood of permanent AF or AFL was lower with dronedarone (178 patients [7.6%]) compared to placebo (295 patients [12.8%]) (p 〈0.001). At the time of first AF or AFL recurrence, the mean heart rates were 85.3 and 95.5 beats/min in the dronedarone and placebo groups, respectively (p 〈0.001). In conclusion, dronedarone demonstrated both rhythm- and rate-controlling properties in ATHENA. These effects are likely to contribute to the reduction of important clinical outcomes observed in this trial.
    Subject(s): Cardiovascular ; Cardiology. Vascular system ; Heart ; Biological and medical sciences ; Medical sciences ; Cardiac dysrhythmias ; Follow-Up Studies ; Humans ; Middle Aged ; Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data ; Male ; Risk ; Secondary Prevention ; Cause of Death ; Amiodarone - adverse effects ; Heart Rate - drug effects ; Amiodarone - therapeutic use ; Atrial Fibrillation - mortality ; Signal Processing, Computer-Assisted ; Adult ; Female ; Stroke - mortality ; Stroke - prevention & control ; Double-Blind Method ; Atrial Fibrillation - drug therapy ; Kaplan-Meier Estimate ; Proportional Hazards Models ; Electrocardiography - drug effects ; Combined Modality Therapy ; Anti-Arrhythmia Agents - therapeutic use ; Amiodarone - analogs & derivatives ; Atrial Flutter - mortality ; Anti-Arrhythmia Agents - adverse effects ; Electric Countershock - utilization ; Atrial Flutter - drug therapy ; Utilization Review ; Index Medicus ; Abridged Index Medicus
    ISSN: 0002-9149
    E-ISSN: 1879-1913
    Source: Backfile Package - All of Back Files EBS [ALLOFBCKF]
    Source: © ProQuest LLC All rights reserved〈img src="https://exlibris-pub.s3.amazonaws.com/PQ_Logo.jpg" style="vertical-align:middle;margin-left:7px"〉
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  • 3
    Language: English
    In: The American journal of cardiology, 2012, Vol.110 (11), p.1646-1650
    Description: A family with asymptomatic Wenckebach atrioventricular block (Wenckebach periodicity [WP]) has been followed at the investigators' institution for 〉4 decades. In contrast to all reported cases of WP (except in top-ranking athletes) family members have WP at rest that promptly converts to regular sinus tachycardia with exercise. They also have mild apical noncompaction that has been quite stable. Because of apparent autosomal dominant inheritance of the structural and arrhythmia disorders, deoxyribonucleic acid was obtained from 4 affected family members in 2 generations for sequence analysis of the cardiac transcription factor gene NKX2.5. A novel frame-shift mutation (c.959delC) was identified that would result in premature truncation of the protein at residue 293, with loss of the C-terminal 31 amino acids. The responsiveness of WP to exercise, the long-term stability of the WP rhythm, and the mild asymptomatic structural features expand the phenotypic presentation of diseases related to mutations in NKX2.5. In addition, the physiology of WP is reviewed in these subjects and in highly conditioned athletes. In conclusion, the investigators report familial stable WP and ventricular noncompaction caused by a mutation in NKX2.5.
    Subject(s): Cardiovascular ; Cardiology. Vascular system ; Biological and medical sciences ; Medical sciences ; Atrioventricular Block - genetics ; Atrioventricular Block - physiopathology ; Atrioventricular Block - metabolism ; Humans ; Middle Aged ; Male ; Transcription Factors - genetics ; Tachycardia - physiopathology ; Homeodomain Proteins - genetics ; DNA - genetics ; Rest - physiology ; Tachycardia - metabolism ; Young Adult ; Homeobox Protein Nkx-2.5 ; DNA Mutational Analysis ; Pedigree ; Tachycardia - genetics ; Aged, 80 and over ; Electrocardiography ; Heart Rate - physiology ; Adult ; Female ; Aged ; Mutation ; Index Medicus ; Abridged Index Medicus
    ISSN: 0002-9149
    E-ISSN: 1879-1913
    Source: Backfile Package - All of Back Files EBS [ALLOFBCKF]
    Source: © ProQuest LLC All rights reserved〈img src="https://exlibris-pub.s3.amazonaws.com/PQ_Logo.jpg" style="vertical-align:middle;margin-left:7px"〉
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  • 4
    Language: English
    In: The New England journal of medicine, 2009-02-12, Vol.360 (7), p.668-678
    Description: The antiarrhythmic drug dronedarone was compared with placebo in 4628 patients with atrial fibrillation. At a mean follow-up of 21 months, the rate of first hospitalization due to cardiovascular events or death was significantly lower with dronedarone than with placebo. The dronedarone group had higher rates of bradycardia, QT-interval prolongation, nausea, diarrhea, rash, and increase in the serum creatinine level. The antiarrhythmic drug dronedarone was compared with placebo in patients with atrial fibrillation. At a mean follow-up of 21 months, the rate of first hospitalization due to cardiovascular events or death was significantly lower with dronedarone. Atrial fibrillation is the most common type of cardiac arrhythmia requiring medical care, with a prevalence of almost 1% in the adult population in the United States. 1 Its prevalence increases with age, affecting 3.8% of the U.S. population over 60 years of age and 9.0% of the population older than 80 years. Over the past two decades, hospitalizations for atrial fibrillation in the United States have increased by a factor of two to three, resulting in a substantial public health burden. 2 Despite advances in nonpharmacologic therapy, 3 many symptomatic patients receive medical treatment for rhythm control. Currently available antiarrhythmic agents are . . .
    Subject(s): Cardiology. Vascular system ; Heart ; Biological and medical sciences ; General aspects ; Medical sciences ; Cardiac dysrhythmias ; Double-Blind Method ; Follow-Up Studies ; Atrial Fibrillation - drug therapy ; Cardiovascular Diseases - prevention & control ; Humans ; Middle Aged ; Risk Factors ; Kaplan-Meier Estimate ; Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data ; Male ; Treatment Outcome ; Secondary Prevention ; Anti-Arrhythmia Agents - therapeutic use ; Amiodarone - analogs & derivatives ; Amiodarone - adverse effects ; Bradycardia - chemically induced ; Amiodarone - therapeutic use ; Anti-Arrhythmia Agents - adverse effects ; Atrial Fibrillation - mortality ; Cardiovascular Diseases - mortality ; Creatinine - blood ; Female ; Aged ; Complications and side effects ; Care and treatment ; Atrial fibrillation ; Risk factors ; Anti-arrhythmia drugs ; Data collection ; Cardiac arrhythmia ; Patients ; Mortality
    ISSN: 0028-4793
    E-ISSN: 1533-4406
    Source: Single Journals
    Source: © ProQuest LLC All rights reserved〈img src="https://exlibris-pub.s3.amazonaws.com/PQ_Logo.jpg" style="vertical-align:middle;margin-left:7px"〉
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  • 5
    Language: English
    In: The New England journal of medicine, 2018-09-27, Vol.379 (13), p.1274-1275
    Description: Sudden cardiac death, typically due to a ventricular tachyarrhythmia, is a devastating complication of myocardial infarction that poses the greatest risk during the first 30 days after the infarct, especially among patients with a reduced left ventricular ejection fraction. 1 However, two randomized, controlled trials showed no survival benefit with early implantation of an implantable cardioverter–defibrillator (ICD) after myocardial infarction. 2,3 Consequently, clinical practice guidelines recommend waiting for at least 40 days after myocardial infarction and 90 days after coronary revascularization for the implantation of an ICD for primary prevention. 4 This paradox of increased risk of sudden cardiac death but lack of . . .
    Subject(s): Electric Countershock ; Myocardial Infarction ; Defibrillators ; Humans ; Wearable Electronic Devices ; Death, Sudden ; Treatment outcome ; Care and treatment ; Usage ; Safety and security measures ; Analysis ; Implantable cardioverter-defibrillators ; Heart attack ; Myocardial infarction ; Heart ; Prevention ; Cardiac arrhythmia ; Heart attacks ; Tachyarrhythmia ; Clinical trials ; Death ; Ventricle ; Patients ; Index Medicus ; Abridged Index Medicus
    ISSN: 0028-4793
    E-ISSN: 1533-4406
    Source: Single Journals
    Source: © ProQuest LLC All rights reserved〈img src="https://exlibris-pub.s3.amazonaws.com/PQ_Logo.jpg" style="vertical-align:middle;margin-left:7px"〉
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  • 6
    Article
    Article
    2004
    ISSN: 0028-4793 
    Language: English
    In: The New England journal of medicine, 2004-12-02, Vol.351 (23), p.2408-2416
    Description: A 77-year-old woman with a history of hypertension treated with metoprolol presents for her annual examination. She reports no new symptoms. The examination is remarkable only for an irregular heart rate. Electrocardiographic testing reveals atrial fibrillation at an average rate of 75 beats per minute. She has no history of arrhythmia, coronary disease, valvular disease, diabetes, alcohol abuse, or transient ischemic attack or stroke. What should her physician advise? A 77-year-old woman with a history of hypertension presents for her annual examination. Electrocardiographic testing reveals atrial fibrillation. What should her physician advise? Foreword This Journal feature begins with a case vignette highlighting a common clinical problem. Evidence supporting various strategies is then presented, followed by a review of formal guidelines, when they exist. The article ends with the author's clinical recommendations. Stage A 77-year-old woman with a history of hypertension treated with metoprolol presents for her annual examination. She reports no new symptoms. The examination is remarkable only for the finding of an irregular heart rate. Electrocardiographic testing reveals atrial fibrillation at an average rate of 75 beats per minute. She has no history of arrhythmia, coronary disease, valvular disease, diabetes, alcohol abuse, transient ischemic attack, or stroke. For the past several months, she has exercised on a treadmill without difficulty, although she notes that the machine does not always measure her heart rate. What should her physician advise? The Clinical . . .
    Subject(s): Cardiology. Vascular system ; Heart ; Biological and medical sciences ; General aspects ; Medical sciences ; Cardiac dysrhythmias ; Hypertension ; Case studies ; Diagnosis ; Cookery for hypertensives ; Atrial fibrillation ; Heart rate ; Cardiac arrhythmia ; Stroke ; Cardiovascular disease ; Patients
    ISSN: 0028-4793
    E-ISSN: 1533-4406
    Source: Single Journals
    Source: © ProQuest LLC All rights reserved〈img src="https://exlibris-pub.s3.amazonaws.com/PQ_Logo.jpg" style="vertical-align:middle;margin-left:7px"〉
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  • 7
    Language: English
    In: The American journal of cardiology, 2008, Vol.101 (10), p.1456-1466
    Description: The initial electrocardiographic evaluation of every tachyarrhythmia should begin by addressing the question of whether the QRS complex is wide or narrow. The most important cause of wide complex tachycardia (WCT) is ventricular tachycardia. However, supraventricular tachycardia can also manifest with a wide QRS complex. The ability to differentiate between supraventricular tachycardia with a wide QRS due to aberrancy or preexcitation and ventricular tachycardia often presents a diagnostic challenge. The identification of whether WCT has a ventricular or supraventricular origin is critical because the treatment for each is different, and improper therapy may have potentially lethal consequences. In conclusion, although the diagnosis and treatment of sustained WCT often arise in emergency situations, this report focuses on a stepwise approach to the management of WCT in relatively stable adult patients, particularly the diagnosis and differentiation of ventricular tachycardia from supraventricular tachycardia with a wide QRS complex on standard 12-lead electrocardiography.
    Subject(s): Cardiovascular ; Cardiology. Vascular system ; Biological and medical sciences ; Medical sciences ; Tachycardia, Ventricular - therapy ; Tachycardia, Ventricular - physiopathology ; Prognosis ; Humans ; Tachycardia, Ventricular - diagnosis ; Electrocardiography ; Heart Rate - physiology ; Adult ; Anti-Arrhythmia Agents - therapeutic use ; Electric Countershock - methods ; Index Medicus ; Abridged Index Medicus
    ISSN: 0002-9149
    E-ISSN: 1879-1913
    Source: Backfile Package - All of Back Files EBS [ALLOFBCKF]
    Source: © ProQuest LLC All rights reserved〈img src="https://exlibris-pub.s3.amazonaws.com/PQ_Logo.jpg" style="vertical-align:middle;margin-left:7px"〉
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  • 8
    Language: English
    In: Journal of the American College of Cardiology, 2013, Vol.62 (22), p.2102-2109
    Description: Objectives This study sought to characterize the relative frequency, care, and survival of sudden cardiac arrest in traditional indoor exercise facilities, alternative indoor exercise sites, and other indoor sites. Background Little is known about the relative frequency of sudden cardiac arrest at traditional indoor exercise facilities versus other indoor locations where people engage in exercise or about the survival at these sites in comparison with other indoor locations. Methods We examined every public indoor sudden cardiac arrest in Seattle and King County from 1996 to 2008 and categorized each event as occurring at a traditional exercise center, an alternative exercise site, or a public indoor location not used for exercise. Arrests were further defined by the classification of the site, activity performed, demographics, characteristics of treatment, and survival. For some location types, annualized site incident rates of cardiac arrests were calculated. Results We analyzed 849 arrests, with 52 at traditional centers, 84 at alternative exercise sites, and 713 at sites not associated with exercise. The site incident rates of arrests at indoor tennis facilities, indoor ice arenas, and bowling alleys were higher than at traditional fitness centers. Survival to hospital discharge was greater at exercise sites (56% at traditional and 45% at alternative) than at other public indoor locations (34%; p = 0.001). Conclusions We observed a higher rate of cardiac arrests at some alternative exercise facilities than at traditional exercise sites. Survival was higher at exercise sites than at nonexercise indoor sites. These data have important implications for automated external defibrillator placement.
    Subject(s): Cardiovascular ; Internal Medicine ; automated external defibrillator ; sudden cardiac arrest ; cardiopulmonary resuscitation ; emergency cardiac care ; Public health ; Cardiac arrest
    ISSN: 0735-1097
    E-ISSN: 1558-3597
    Source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
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  • 9
    Language: English
    In: Journal of the American College of Cardiology, 2016-04-05, Vol.67 (13), p.e27-e115
    Subject(s): Index Medicus ; Abridged Index Medicus
    E-ISSN: 1558-3597
    Source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
    Source: © ProQuest LLC All rights reserved〈img src="https://exlibris-pub.s3.amazonaws.com/PQ_Logo.jpg" style="vertical-align:middle;margin-left:7px"〉
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  • 10
    Language: English
    In: Journal of general internal medicine : JGIM, 2010-08, Vol.25 (8), p.853-858
    Description: Diabetes may be an independent risk factor for atrial fibrillation. However, results from prior studies are in conflict, and no study has examined diabetes duration or glycemic control.To examine the association of diabetes with risk of atrial fibrillation and to describe risk according to diabetes duration and glycemic control.A population-based case-control study.Within a large, integrated healthcare delivery system, we identified 1,410 people with newly-recognized atrial fibrillation from ICD-9 codes and validated cases by review of medical records. 2,203 controls without atrial fibrillation were selected from enrollment lists, stratified on age, sex, hypertension, and calendar year.Information on atrial fibrillation, diabetes and other characteristics came from medical records. Diabetes was defined based on physician diagnoses recorded in the medical record, and pharmacologically treated diabetes was defined as receiving antihyperglycemic medications. Information about hemoglobin A1c levels came from computerized laboratory data.Among people with atrial fibrillation, 252/1410 (17.9%) had pharmacologically treated diabetes compared to 311/2203 (14.1%) of controls. The adjusted OR for atrial fibrillation was 1.40 (95% CI 1.15-1.71) for people with treated diabetes compared to those without diabetes. Among those with treated diabetes, the risk of developing atrial fibrillation was 3% higher for each additional year of diabetes duration (95% CI 1-6%). Compared to people without diabetes, the adjusted OR for people with treated diabetes with average hemoglobin A1c ≤7 was 1.06 (95% CI 0.74-1.51); for A1c 〉7 but ≤8, 1.48 (1.09-2.01); for A1c 〉8 but ≤9, 1.46 (1.02-2.08); and for A1c 〉9, 1.96 (1.22–3.14).Diabetes was associated with higher risk of developing atrial fibrillation, and risk was higher with longer duration of treated diabetes and worse glycemic control. Future research should identify and test approaches to reduce the risk of atrial fibrillation in people with diabetes.
    Subject(s): atrial fibrillation ; Medicine & Public Health ; glycemic control ; arrhythmia ; Internal Medicine ; diabetes mellitus ; diabetes complications ; Cardiology. Vascular system ; Heart ; General aspects ; Diabetes. Impaired glucose tolerance ; Cardiac dysrhythmias ; Biological and medical sciences ; Endocrinopathies ; Etiopathogenesis. Screening. Investigations. Target tissue resistance ; Medical sciences ; Endocrine pancreas. Apud cells (diseases) ; Body Mass Index ; Hyperglycemia - prevention & control ; Multivariate Analysis ; Confidence Intervals ; Humans ; Middle Aged ; Risk Factors ; Hyperglycemia - complications ; Blood Glucose ; Logistic Models ; Male ; Diabetes Complications - complications ; Case-Control Studies ; Atrial Fibrillation - epidemiology ; Time Factors ; Glycated Hemoglobin A ; Atrial Fibrillation - etiology ; Female ; Aged ; Odds Ratio ; Diabetes Complications - prevention & control ; Index Medicus ; Original Research
    ISSN: 0884-8734
    E-ISSN: 1525-1497
    Source: PubMed Central
    Source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
    Source: © ProQuest LLC All rights reserved〈img src="https://exlibris-pub.s3.amazonaws.com/PQ_Logo.jpg" style="vertical-align:middle;margin-left:7px"〉
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