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  • 1
    Language: English
    In: 2011
    Description: Background Injuries are a major morbidity and mortality cause among children and young adults worldwide. Previous Ugandan studies were limited in scope and biased towards severe adulthood injuries in referral care. Aims and Objectives This study explored the epidemiology of childhood and young adulthood injuries in Uganda: specifically their extent, pattern, distribution, risk and determinants, and stakeholder perceptions their regarding prevention and control. Methods Cross-sectional survey was used to describe unintentional domestic injury patterns and determinants among under-fives; facility-based surveillance, to determine the distribution, characteristics, and outcomes of violent injuries among 13-23-year-olds and all injuries among under-13s; cohort design, to explore the extent, nature and determinants of school-related risk; FGDs and KIIs, to explore stakeholder perceptions of prevention. Chi-square tests were used to evaluate categorical differences, t-tests, quantitative differences,...
    Subject(s): Medical And Health Sciences ; Medicin Och Hälsovetenskap
    Source: SwePub (National Library of Sweden)
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  • 2
    Language: English
    In: International journal of injury control and safety promotion, 01 December 2012, Vol.19(4), pp.357-367
    Description: Childhood injuries remain understudied in Uganda. The objective of this study was to determine the extent, nature and determinants of school-related childhood injury risk in north-western Uganda. A cohort of 1000 grade fives from 13 elementary schools was followed-up for one term. Survival and multi-level modelling techniques compared the risk rates across gender, schools and locations. Childhood injuries are common in north-western Uganda. Most of them occur during travel, breaks, practical classes and gardening, while walking, playing, learning and digging. Most injuries result from collisions with objects, sports and falls. Two-thirds of children receive first aid and hospital care. Times to injury were 72.1 and 192.9 person days (p = 0.0000). Gender differences in time to event were significant (p = 0.0091). Girls had better survival rates: cumulative prevalence of childhood injury was 36.1%; with significant gender differences (p = 0.007). Injury rate was 12.3/1000 person...
    Subject(s): School Children ; Injury Risk ; Injury Rates ; Multi-Level Survival Analysis ; Social Welfare & Social Work
    ISSN: 1745-7300
    E-ISSN: 1745-7319
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  • 3
    Language: English
    In: Injury Prevention November 2018, Vol.24(Suppl 2), p.A28
    Description: Globally, burn deaths are disproportionately higher among children below five years compared to other age groups. Although rarely fatal, most burns among this age group occur within the home environment specifically in the kitchen.
    Subject(s): Burns ; Ghettos;
    ISSN: 1353-8047
    ISSN: 13538047
    E-ISSN: 1475-5785
    E-ISSN: 14755785
    Source: BMJ Journals (BMJ Publishing Group)
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  • 4
    Language: English
    In: Journal of injury and violence research, 01 January 2011, Vol.3(1), pp.13-18
    Description: BACKGROUND: Unintentional Childhood Injuries pose a major public health challenge in Africa and Uganda. Previous estimates of the problem may have underestimated the childhood problem. We set to determine unintentional childhood injury pattern, odds, and outcomes at the National Paediatric Emergency unit in Kampala city using surveillance data. METHODS: Incident proportions, odds and proportional rates were calculated and used to determine unintentional injury patterns across childhood (1-12 years). RESULTS: A total of 556 cases recorded between January and May 2008 were analyzed: majority had been transported to hospital by mothers using mini-buses, private cars, and motorcycles. Median distance from injury location to hospital was 5 km. Homes, roads, and schools were leading injury locations. Males constituted 60% of the cases. Play and daily living activities were commonest injury time activities. Falls, burns and traffic accounted for 70.5% of unintentional childhood injuries....
    Subject(s): Unintentional- Childhood ; Injuries ; Emergency Unit ; Referral Hospital ; Medicine
    ISSN: 2008-2053
    E-ISSN: 2008-4072
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  • 5
    Language: English
    In: International journal of injury control and safety promotion, 01 September 2010, Vol.17(3), pp.141-144
    Description: The study validated structure stability, reliability and sub-scale distinctiveness of integrated conflict and violence scale (ICVS) and was cross-sectional; war-affected grade 5 school children participated. ICV internal factorial validity and reliability were evaluated; eigenvalue size and scree plots were used for factor selection. A variable retention factor load threshold of 0.30 was used: Cronbach's α tests confirmed reliability increments. Pair-wise Pearson correlation tests evaluated sub-scale distinctiveness. Gulu University granted ethical clearance. A total of 280 grade 5 children from 50 primary schools participated: 53% of them were males. Two factors accounted for 100% of variability in attitudes; 18 variables were retained. Expelled variables were: 'If I catch some one stealing my sugar cane I will fight' and 'a bully should be forgiven'. Sub-scale internal consistency reliability coefficients were 0.73 and 0.65, respectively and distinctiveness correlation coefficient...
    Subject(s): Conflict ; Violence ; Scale ; Social Welfare & Social Work
    ISSN: 1745-7300
    E-ISSN: 1745-7319
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  • 6
    In: Journal of Public Health in Africa, 2011, Vol.2(1)
    Description: Globally, 90% of road crash deaths occur in the developing world. Children in Africa bear the major part of this burden, with the highest unintentional injury rates in the world. Our study aims to better understand injury patterns among children living in Kampala, Uganda and provide evidence that injuries are significant in child health. Trauma registry records of injured children seen at Mulago Hospital in Kampala were analysed. Data were collected when patients were seen initially and included patient condition, demographics, clinical variables, cause, severity, as measured by the Kampala trauma score, and location of injury. Outcomes were captured on discharge from the casualty department and at two weeks for admitted patients. From August 2004 to August 2005, 872 injury visits for children 〈18 years old were recorded. The mean age was 11 years (95% CI 10.9–11.6); 68% (95% CI 65–72%) were males; 64% were treated in casualty and discharged; 35% were admitted. The most common causes were traffic crashes (34%), falls (18%) and violence (15%). Most children (87%) were mildly injured; 1% severely injured. By two weeks, 6% of the patients admitted for injuries had died and, of these morbidities, 16% had severe injuries, 63% had moderate injuries and 21% had mild injuries. We concluded that, in Kampala, children bear a large burden of injury from preventable causes. Deaths in low severity patients highlight the need for improvements in facility based care. Further studies are necessary to capture overall child injury mortality and to measure chronic morbidity owing to sequelae of injuries.
    Subject(s): Article ; Road Traffic ; Injuries ; Developing Country ; Trauma.
    ISSN: 2038-9922
    E-ISSN: 2038-9930
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  • 7
    Language: English
    Description: Globally, 90% of road crash deaths occur in the developing world. Children in Africa bear the major part of this burden, with the highest unintentional injury rates in the world. Our study aims to better understand injury patterns among children living in Kampala, Uganda and provide evidence that injuries are significant in child health. Trauma registry records of injured children seen at Mulago Hospital in Kampala were analysed. Data were collected when patients were seen initially and included patient condition, demographics, clinical variables, cause, severity, as measured by the Kampala trauma score, and location of injury. Outcomes were captured on discharge from the casualty department and at two weeks for admitted patients. From August 2004 to August 2005, 872 injury visits for children 18 years old were recorded. The mean age was 11 years (95% CI 10.9-11.6); 68% (95% CI 65-72%) were males; 64% were treated in casualty and discharged; 35% were admitted. The most common...
    Subject(s): Developing Country ; Injuries ; Road Traffic ; Trauma
    Source: eScholarship (California Digital Library)
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  • 8
    Language: English
    In: International Journal of Emergency Medicine, 2010, Vol.3(3), pp.165-172
    Description: Byline: Renee Y. Hsia (1), Doruk Ozgediz (2), Milton Mutto (3), Sudha Jayaraman (4), Patrick Kyamanywa (5), Olive C. Kobusingye (6) Keywords: Road traffic; Injuries; Developing country; Trauma; Uganda Abstract: Background Despite the growing burden of injuries in LMICs, there are still limited primary epidemiologic data to guide health policy and health system development. Understanding the epidemiology of injury in developing countries can help identify risk factors for injury and target interventions for prevention and treatment to decrease disability and mortality. Aim To estimate the epidemiology of the injury seen in patients presenting to the government hospital in Kampala, the capital city of Uganda. Methods A secondary analysis of a prospectively collected database collected by the Injury Control Centre-Uganda at the Mulago National Referral Hospital, Kampala, Uganda, 2004-2005. Results From 1 August 2004 to 12 August 2005, a total of 3,750 injury-related visits were recorded a final sample of 3,481 records were analyzed. The majority of patients (62%) were treated in the casualty department and then discharged 38% were admitted. Road traffic injuries (RTIs) were the most common causes of injury for all age groups in this sample, except for those under 5 years old, and accounted for 49% of total injuries. RTIs were also the most common cause of mortality in trauma patients. Within traffic injuries, more passengers (44%) and pedestrians (30%) were injured than drivers (27%). Other causes of trauma included blunt/penetrating injuries (25% of injuries) and falls (10%). Less than 5% of all patients arriving to the emergency department for injuries arrived by ambulance. Conclusions Road traffic injuries are by far the largest cause of both morbidity and mortality in Kampala. They are the most common cause of injury for all ages, except those younger than 5, and school-aged children comprise a large proportion of victims from these incidents. The integration of injury control programs with ongoing health initiatives is an urgent priority for health and development. Author Affiliation: (1) Department of Emergency Medicine, University of California at San Francisco, 1001 Potrero Avenue, 1E21, San Francisco, CA, 94110, USA (2) Department of Surgery, University of Toronto, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON, Canada (3) Injury Control Center- Uganda, Kampala, Uganda (4) Department of Surgery, University of California at San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA (5) Department of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, National University of Rwanda, Butare, Rwanda (6) Regional Office for Africa, World Health Organization, Harare, Zimbabwe Article History: Registration Date: 01/06/2010 Received Date: 23/05/2009 Accepted Date: 31/05/2010 Online Date: 20/07/2010 Article note: The views expressed in this paper are those of the author(s) and not those of the editors, editorial board or publisher.
    Subject(s): Road traffic ; Injuries ; Developing country ; Trauma ; Uganda
    ISSN: 1865-1372
    E-ISSN: 1865-1380
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  • 9
    Language: English
    In: Injury Prevention, 30 October 2010, Vol.16(5), p.333
    Description: To determine intentional injury burden, incident characteristics, and outcomes among Ugandan youth.
    Subject(s): Youth ; Intentional Injury ; Trauma Registry ; Uganda ; Adolescent ; Violence ; Youth Violence, Injury Outcomes, Uganda
    ISSN: 1353-8047
    ISSN: 13538047
    E-ISSN: 1475-5785
    E-ISSN: 14755785
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  • 10
    Language: English
    In: BMC infectious diseases, 01 June 2017, Vol.17(1), pp.1-8
    Description: Abstract Background Viral suppression is a critical indicator of HIV treatment success. In the era of test-and-start, little is known about treatment outcomes and time to undetectable viral loads. This study compares treatment outcomes, median times to achieve undetectable viral loads and its predictors under different antiretroviral (ART) treatment initiation schedules (i.e. within seven days of enrolment or later). Methods A retrospective cohort of 367 patients 18 years who enrolled in care between January 2010 and December 2015 with a baseline viral load of 5000 copies/ml were followed up for 60 months. Undetectable viral load measurements were based on both Roche (20copies/ml) and Abbot (75copies/ml). Clinical treatment outcomes were compared using chi-squared test. Survival experiences between the two cohorts were assessed through incidence rates and Kaplan Meier curves. A cox model with competing risks was used to assess predictors for time to undetectable...
    Subject(s): HIV ; Undetectable Viral Load ; Antiretroviral Therapy ; Outcomes ; Timing ; Medicine
    E-ISSN: 1471-2334
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