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  • 1
    Language: English
    In: The American journal of clinical nutrition, 2019-11-01, Vol.110 (5), p.1053-1054
    Subject(s): Female ; Male ; Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 ; Dietary Fats ; Humans ; Dairy Products ; Index Medicus ; Abridged Index Medicus
    ISSN: 0002-9165
    E-ISSN: 1938-3207
    Source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
    Source: © ProQuest LLC All rights reserved〈img src="https://exlibris-pub.s3.amazonaws.com/PQ_Logo.jpg" style="vertical-align:middle;margin-left:7px"〉
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  • 2
    Language: English
    In: Journal of the American College of Cardiology, 2017-07-04, Vol.70 (1), p.26-28
    Description: [Display omitted]
    Subject(s): global health ; epidemiology ; cause of death ; Index Medicus ; Abridged Index Medicus
    ISSN: 0735-1097
    E-ISSN: 1558-3597
    Source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
    Source: © ProQuest LLC All rights reserved〈img src="https://exlibris-pub.s3.amazonaws.com/PQ_Logo.jpg" style="vertical-align:middle;margin-left:7px"〉
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  • 3
    Language: English
    In: The American journal of clinical nutrition, 2008, Vol.87 (6), p.1991S-1996S
    Description: Large observational studies, randomized clinical trials, and experimental studies have evaluated the effects of fish and n-3 fatty acid consumption on fatal coronary heart disease (CHD) and sudden cardiac death (SCD), clinically defined events that most often share the final common pathway of fatal ventricular arrhythmia. These different study designs, each having complementary strengths and limitations, provide strong concordant evidence that modest consumption of fish or fish oil (1-2 servings/wk of oily fish, or approximately 250 mg/d of EPA+DHA) substantially reduces the risk of CHD death and SCD. Pooled analysis of prospective cohort studies and randomized clinical trials demonstrates the magnitude and dose-response of this effect, with 36% lower risk of CHD death comparing 0 and 250 mg/d of EPA+DHA consumption (P 〈 0.001), but then little additional benefit with higher intakes. Reductions in risk are even larger in observational studies utilizing tissue biomarkers of n-3 fatty acids that more accurately measure dietary consumption. The concordance of findings from different studies also suggests that effects of fish or fish oil on CHD death and SCD do not vary depending on presence or absence of established CHD. The strength and consistency of the evidence, and the magnitude of this effect are each notable. Because more than one-half of all CHD deaths and two-thirds of SCD occur among individuals without recognized heart disease, modest consumption of fish or fish oil, together with smoking cessation and regular moderate physical activity, should be among the first-line treatments for prevention of CHD death and SCD.
    Subject(s): Fundamental and applied biological sciences. Psychology ; Feeding. Feeding behavior ; Biological and medical sciences ; Vertebrates: anatomy and physiology, studies on body, several organs or systems ; Greenland - epidemiology ; Humans ; Coronary Disease - epidemiology ; Death, Sudden, Cardiac - prevention & control ; Feeding Behavior ; Coronary Disease - mortality ; Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic ; Coronary Disease - prevention & control ; Animals ; Dietary Proteins ; Fishes ; Inuits - statistics & numerical data ; Survival Analysis ; Fatty Acids, Omega-3 - therapeutic use ; Prevention ; Care and treatment ; Analysis ; Physiological aspects ; Coronary heart disease ; Health aspects ; Risk factors ; Omega-3 fatty acids ; Index Medicus ; Abridged Index Medicus
    ISSN: 0002-9165
    E-ISSN: 1938-3207
    Source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
    Source: © ProQuest LLC All rights reserved〈img src="https://exlibris-pub.s3.amazonaws.com/PQ_Logo.jpg" style="vertical-align:middle;margin-left:7px"〉
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  • 4
    Language: English
    In: JAMA : the journal of the American Medical Association, 2017-05-02, Vol.317 (17), p.1755-1756
    Description: Across medical and scientific research, few areas are as relevant to health as food and nutrition.The challenges involving the role of the food industry in research are profound and not easily dismissed.The challenges involving the role of the food industry in research are profound and not easily dismissed.
    Subject(s): Financing, Government - economics ; Diet - adverse effects ; Research Support as Topic - economics ; Humans ; Nutritional Physiological Phenomena ; Food Industry - ethics ; Food Industry - economics ; Conflict of Interest ; Research Support as Topic - ethics ; Influence ; Conflict of interests (Agency) ; Nutritional guidelines ; Food industry ; Analysis ; Ethical aspects ; Index Medicus ; Abridged Index Medicus
    ISSN: 0098-7484
    E-ISSN: 1538-3598
    Source: American Medical Association Journals Backfile (through 1997)
    Source: © ProQuest LLC All rights reserved〈img src="https://exlibris-pub.s3.amazonaws.com/PQ_Logo.jpg" style="vertical-align:middle;margin-left:7px"〉
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  • 5
    Article
    Article
    2009
    ISSN: 1660-4601  ISSN: 1661-7827 
    Language: English
    In: International journal of environmental research and public health, 2009-06, Vol.6 (6), p.1894-1916
    Description: Controversy has arisen among the public and in the media regarding the health effects of fish intake in adults. Substantial evidence indicates that fish consumption reduces coronary heart disease mortality, the leading cause of death in developed and most developing nations. Conversely, concerns have grown regarding potential effects of exposure to mercury found in some fish. Seafood species are also rich in selenium, an essential trace element that may protect against both cardiovascular disease and toxic effects of mercury. Such protective effects would have direct implications for recommendations regarding optimal selenium intake and for assessing the potential impact of mercury exposure from fish intake in different populations. Because fish consumption appears to have important health benefits in adults, elucidating the relationships between fish intake, mercury and selenium exposure, and health risk is of considerable scientific and public health relevance. The evidence for health effects of fish consumption in adults is reviewed, focusing on the strength and consistency of evidence and relative magnitudes of effects of omega-3 fatty acids, mercury, and selenium. Given the preponderance of evidence, the focus is on cardiovascular effects, but other potential health effects, as well as potential effects of polychlorinated biphenyls and dioxins in fish, are also briefly reviewed. The relevant current unanswered questions and directions of further research are summarized.
    Subject(s): Mercury - toxicity ; Food Analysis ; Animals ; Mercury - analysis ; Selenium - analysis ; Fishes ; Humans ; Risk Factors ; Selenium - toxicity ; Seafood ; Adult ; Cardiovascular Diseases - chemically induced ; cardiovascular disease ; Review ; selenium ; mercury ; fish ; review
    ISSN: 1660-4601
    ISSN: 1661-7827
    E-ISSN: 1660-4601
    Source: PubMed Central
    Source: Directory of Open Access Journals
    Source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
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  • 6
    Language: English
    In: JAMA : the journal of the American Medical Association, 2006-10-18, Vol.296 (15), p.1885-1899
    Description: CONTEXT Fish (finfish or shellfish) may have health benefits and also contain contaminants, resulting in confusion over the role of fish consumption in a healthy diet. EVIDENCE ACQUISITION We searched MEDLINE, governmental reports, and meta-analyses, supplemented by hand reviews of references and direct investigator contacts, to identify reports published through April 2006 evaluating (1) intake of fish or fish oil and cardiovascular risk, (2) effects of methylmercury and fish oil on early neurodevelopment, (3) risks of methylmercury for cardiovascular and neurologic outcomes in adults, and (4) health risks of dioxins and polychlorinated biphenyls in fish. We concentrated on studies evaluating risk in humans, focusing on evidence, when available, from randomized trials and large prospective studies. When possible, meta-analyses were performed to characterize benefits and risks most precisely. EVIDENCE SYNTHESIS Modest consumption of fish (eg, 1-2 servings/wk), especially species higher in the n-3 fatty acids eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), reduces risk of coronary death by 36% (95% confidence interval, 20%-50%; P〈.001) and total mortality by 17% (95% confidence interval, 0%-32%; P = .046) and may favorably affect other clinical outcomes. Intake of 250 mg/d of EPA and DHA appears sufficient for primary prevention. DHA appears beneficial for, and low-level methylmercury may adversely affect, early neurodevelopment. Women of childbearing age and nursing mothers should consume 2 seafood servings/wk, limiting intake of selected species. Health effects of low-level methylmercury in adults are not clearly established; methylmercury may modestly decrease the cardiovascular benefits of fish intake. A variety of seafood should be consumed; individuals with very high consumption (≥5 servings/wk) should limit intake of species highest in mercury levels. Levels of dioxins and polychlorinated biphenyls in fish are low, and potential carcinogenic and other effects are outweighed by potential benefits of fish intake and should have little impact on choices or consumption of seafood (women of childbearing age should consult regional advisories for locally caught freshwater fish). CONCLUSIONS For major health outcomes among adults, based on both the strength of the evidence and the potential magnitudes of effect, the benefits of fish intake exceed the potential risks. For women of childbearing age, benefits of modest fish intake, excepting a few selected species, also outweigh risks.
    Subject(s): Water Pollutants, Chemical - metabolism ; Carcinogens ; Fishes - metabolism ; Animals ; Diet ; Risk Assessment ; Food Contamination ; Humans ; Seafood - adverse effects ; Fatty Acids, Omega-3 ; Mercury Poisoning - etiology ; Women ; Fish as food ; Health aspects ; Contamination
    ISSN: 0098-7484
    E-ISSN: 1538-3598
    Source: American Medical Association Journals Backfile (through 1997)
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  • 7
    Article
    Article
    2016
    ISSN: 0140-6736 
    Language: English
    In: The Lancet (British edition), 2016, Vol.387 (10034), p.2192-2193
    Subject(s): Internal Medicine
    ISSN: 0140-6736
    E-ISSN: 1474-547X
    Source: Backfile Package - All of Back Files EBS [ALLOFBCKF]
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  • 8
    Language: English
    In: JAMA : the journal of the American Medical Association, 2015-06-23, Vol.313 (24), p.2421-2422
    Subject(s): Dietary Carbohydrates ; United States ; Dietary Fats ; Humans ; Evidence-Based Medicine ; Nutrition Policy ; Cholesterol, Dietary ; Diet - standards ; Dietary fat ; Management ; Nutritional guidelines ; Health aspects ; Analysis ; Public health ; Index Medicus ; Abridged Index Medicus
    ISSN: 0098-7484
    E-ISSN: 1538-3598
    Source: American Medical Association Journals Backfile (through 1997)
    Source: © ProQuest LLC All rights reserved〈img src="https://exlibris-pub.s3.amazonaws.com/PQ_Logo.jpg" style="vertical-align:middle;margin-left:7px"〉
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  • 9
    Language: English
    In: The American journal of clinical nutrition, 2014-07, Vol.100 (1), p.278-288
    Description: Relations between the consumption of nuts and legumes and risk of ischemic heart disease (IHD), stroke, and diabetes have not been well established. We systematically investigated and quantified associations of nut and legume consumption with incident IHD, stroke, and diabetes. We systematically searched multiple databases to identify randomized controlled trials or observational studies that examined the relations. Studies were excluded if they reported only intermediate physiologic measures, soft cardiovascular outcomes, or crude risk estimates. Data were extracted independently and in duplicate. We assessed pooled dose-response relations by using a generalized least-squares trend estimation, and prespecified sources of heterogeneity were assessed by using metaregression. The potential for publication bias was explored by using funnel plots, Begg's and Egger's tests, and Duval and Tweedie trim-and-fill methods. Of 3851 abstracts, 25 observational studies (23 prospective and 2 retrospective studies) and 2 trial reports met inclusion criteria and comprised 501,791 unique individuals and 11,869 IHD, 8244 stroke, and 14,449 diabetes events. The consumption of nuts was inversely associated with fatal IHD (6 studies; 6749 events; RR per 4 weekly 28.4-g servings: 0.76; 95% CI: 0.69, 0.84; I(2) = 28%), nonfatal IHD (4 studies; 2101 events; RR: 0.78; 0.67, 0.92; I(2) = 0%), and diabetes (6 studies; 13,308 events; RR: 0.87; 0.81,0.94; I(2) = 22%) but not stroke (4 studies; 5544 events). Legume consumption was inversely associated with total IHD (5 studies; 6514 events; RR per 4 weekly 100-g servings: 0.86; 0.78, 0.94; I(2) = 0%) but not significantly associated with stroke (6 studies; 6690 events) or diabetes (2 studies; 2746 events). A meta-regression did not identify the effect modification by age, duration of follow-up, study location, or study quality. Mixed evidence was seen for publication bias, but analyses by using the Duval and Tweedie trim-and-fill method did not appreciably alter results. This systematic review supports inverse associations between eating nuts and incident IHD and diabetes and eating legumes and incident IHD.
    Subject(s): Stroke - prevention & control ; Nuts ; Humans ; Risk Factors ; Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - prevention & control ; Myocardial Ischemia - prevention & control ; Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - epidemiology ; Fabaceae ; Incidence ; Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic ; Diet ; Endpoint Determination ; Observational Studies as Topic ; Stroke - epidemiology ; Databases, Factual ; Myocardial Ischemia - epidemiology ; Stroke (Disease) ; Legumes ; Beans ; Myocardial ischemia ; Research ; Diabetes ; Health aspects ; Mimosaceae ; Risk factors ; Index Medicus ; Abridged Index Medicus
    ISSN: 0002-9165
    E-ISSN: 1938-3207
    Source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
    Source: © ProQuest LLC All rights reserved〈img src="https://exlibris-pub.s3.amazonaws.com/PQ_Logo.jpg" style="vertical-align:middle;margin-left:7px"〉
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  • 10
    Language: English
    In: BMJ (Clinical research ed.), 2018-03-16, Vol.360, p.k822-k822
    Subject(s): Health Promotion ; Women's Health ; Nutritional Sciences - standards ; Fatty Acids, Unsaturated - adverse effects ; Humans ; Female ; Nutrition Policy ; Index Medicus ; Abridged Index Medicus
    ISSN: 0959-8138
    E-ISSN: 1756-1833
    Source: Single Journals
    Source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
    Source: © ProQuest LLC All rights reserved〈img src="https://exlibris-pub.s3.amazonaws.com/PQ_Logo.jpg" style="vertical-align:middle;margin-left:7px"〉
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