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  • 1
    Article
    Article
    2018
    ISSN: 0021-8529  ISSN: 1540-6245 
    Language: English
    In: The Journal of aesthetics and art criticism, 2018, Vol.76 (1), p.9-20
    Description: ABSTRACT This article explores the philosophically neglected topic of artistic integrity, situated within the literature on personal or moral integrity more generally. It argues that artists lack artistic integrity if, in the process of creation, they place some other—competing, distracting, or corrupting—value over the value of the artwork itself, in a way that violates their own artistic standards. It also argues, however, that artistic integrity does not require adamant refusal to acknowledge or act upon commitments to values other than single‐minded devotion to one's art. Artists of integrity need not be inflexible fanatics. They can seek to earn a living through their art, alter their vision of a work to reach an audience, evolve their artistic standards as they grow as artists, and balance the energy devoted to their art against energy devoted to family, friends, and self‐care; they can honor the demands of morality.
    Subject(s): literary theory and criticism ; integrity ; artistic expression ; philosophical literary theory and criticism
    ISSN: 0021-8529
    ISSN: 1540-6245
    E-ISSN: 1540-6245
    Source: Academic Search Ultimate
    Source: MLA International Bibliography with Full Text
    Source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
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  • 2
    Book
    Book
    2014
    ISBN: 1472440722  ISBN: 9781472440723  ISBN: 9781472440730  ISBN: 1472440730 
    Language: English
    In: Ethics and Children's Literature, 2014
    Description: Exploring the ethical questions posed by, in, and about children's literature, this collection examines the way texts intended for children raise questions of value, depict the moral development of their characters, and call into attention shared moral presuppositions. Even as children's literature has evolved in opposition to its origins in didactic Sunday school tracts and moralizing fables, authors, parents, librarians, and scholars remain sensitive to the values conveyed to children through the texts they choose to share with them.
    Subject(s): Children''s literature ; Books and reading ; Social justice in literature ; Moral education ; Moral and ethical aspects ; Virtues in literature ; Children ; Social values in literature ; Literature and morals ; Children's literature ; Children''s literature -- Moral and ethical aspects ; Children -- Books and reading ; Childrens literature ; Literary criticism ; Ethics ; Morality ; Animals ; Young adults literature ; Racism ; Philosophy
    ISBN: 1472440722
    ISBN: 9781472440723
    ISBN: 9781472440730
    ISBN: 1472440730
    Source: Ebook Central - Academic Complete
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  • 3
    Book
    Book
    2016
    ISBN: 1472440722  ISBN: 9781472440723 
    Language: English
    Description: Exploring the ethical questions posed by, in, and about children’s literature, this collection examines the way texts intended for children raise questions of value, depict the moral development of their characters, and call into attention shared moral presuppositions. The essays in Part I look at various past attempts at conveying moral messages to children and interrogate their underlying assumptions. What visions of childhood were conveyed by explicit attempts to cultivate specific virtues in children? What unstated cultural assumptions were expressed by growing resistance to didacticism? How should we prepare children to respond to racism in their books and in their society? Part II takes up the ethical orientations of various classic and contemporary texts, including 'prosaic ethics' in the Hundred Acre Wood, moral discernment in Narnia, ethical recognition in the distant worlds traversed by L’Engle, and virtuous transgression in recent Anglo-American children’s literature and in the emerging children’s literature of 1960s Taiwan. Part III’s essays engage in ethical criticism of arguably problematic messages about our relationship to nonhuman animals, about war, and about prejudice. The final section considers how we respond to children’s literature with ethically focused essays exploring a range of ways in which child readers and adult authorities react to children’s literature. Even as children’s literature has evolved in opposition to its origins in didactic Sunday school tracts and moralizing fables, authors, parents, librarians, and scholars remain sensitive to the values conveyed to children through the texts they choose to share with them. Introduction Part I The Dilemma of Didacticism: Attempts to Shape Children as Moral Beings 1 Transmitting Ethics through Books of Golden Deeds for Children Claudia Nelson 2 Sermonizing in New York: The Children's Magazines of Mary Mapes Dodge and Jose Marti Emma Adelaida Otheguy 3 Talking to Children about Race: Children's Literature in a Segregated Era, 1930-1945 Moira Hinderer Part II Ethical Themes in Classic and Contemporary Texts 4 Discernment and the Moral Life in Prince Caspian and the Later Narnia Chronicles Emanuelle Burton 5 Making a Difference: Ethical Recognition through Otherness in Madelein L'Engle's Fiction Mary Jeanette Moran 6 A Prosaics of the Hundred Acre Wood: Ethics in A. A. Milne's Winnie the Pooh and The House at Pooh Corner Niall Nance-Carroll 7 Virtuous Transgressors, Not Moral Saints: Protagonists in Contemporary Children's Literature Jani L. Barker 8 Model Children, Little Rebels, and Moral Transgressors: Virtuous Childhood Images in Taiwanese Juvenile Fiction in the 1960s Andrea Mei-Ying Wu Part III Ethical Criticism of Children's Literature 9 The Rights and Wrongs of Anthropomorphism in Picture Books Lisa Rowe Fraustino 10 Lewis, Tolkien, and the Ethics of Imaginary Wars Suzanne Rahn 11 Heeding Rousseau's Advice: Some Ethical Reservations about Addressing Prejudice through Children's Literature Claudia Mills Part IV Ethical Responses to Children's Literature: Identification, Recognition, Adaptation, Conversation 12 The Ethics of Reading Narrative Voice: An Anti-Bakhtinian View Leona W. Fisher 13 Prizing Social Justice: The Jane Addams Children's Book Award Ramona Caponegro 14 Katniss Everdeen's Emerging Moral Consciousness in The Hunger Games Martha Rainbolt 15 Using Children's Literature as a Spark for Ethical Discussion: Stories that Deal with Death Sara Goering Claudia Mills is Associate Professor Emerita of Philosophy at the University of Colorado, Boulder, USA. She is the author of many books for children, most recently Zero Tolerance (Farrar, Straus & Giroux).
    Subject(s): Children's Literature ; Ethics Philosophy ; 20th Century Literature ; Social & Cultural History
    ISBN: 1472440722
    ISBN: 9781472440723
    Source: Ebook Central - Academic Complete
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  • 4
    Language: English
    In: BioScience, 2012, Vol.62 (2), p.160-169
    Description: During the past several decades, high numbers of gelatinous Zooplankton species have been reported in many estuarine and coastal ecosystems. Coupled with media-driven public perception, a paradigm has evolved in which the global ocean ecosystems are thought to he heading toward being dominated by “nuisance” jellyfish. We question this current paradigm by presenting a broad overview of gelatinous Zooplankton in a historical context to develop the hypothesis that population changes reflect the human-mediated alteration of global ocean ecosystems. To this end, we synthesize information related to the evolutionary context of contemporary gelatinous Zooplankton blooms, the human frame of reference for changes in gelatinous Zooplankton populations, and whether sufficient data are available to have established the paradigm. We conclude that the current paradigm in which it is believed that there has been a global increase in gelatinous Zooplankton is unsubstantiated, and we develop a strategy for addressing the ...
    Subject(s): media ; bloom ; jellyfish ; global synthesis ; salp ; Aquatic communities ; Seas ; Jellyfishes ; Oceans ; Ecosystems ; Humans ; Articles ; Marine ecosystems ; Evolution ; Zooplankton ; Species ; Environmental aspects ; Plankton populations ; Food and nutrition ; Analysis ; Distribution ; Plankton ; Ecology
    ISSN: 0006-3568
    E-ISSN: 1525-3244
    Source: Academic Search Ultimate
    Source: Oxford Journals 2016 Current and Archive A-Z Collection
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  • 5
    Language: English
    In: Hydrobiologia, 2001-05, Vol.451 (1), p.55-68
    Description: By the pulsed nature of their life cycles, gelatinous zooplankton come and go seasonally, giving rise in even the most undisturbed circumstances to summer blooms. Even holoplanktonic species like ctenophores increase in number in the spring or summer when planktonic food is available in greater abundance. Beyond that basic life cycle-driven seasonal change in numbers, several other kinds of events appear to be increasing the numbers of jellies present in some ecosystems. Over recent decades, man's expanding influence on the oceans has begun to cause real change and there is reason to think that in some regions, new blooms of jellyfish are occurring in response to some of the cumulative effects of these impacts. The issue is not simple and in most cases there are few data to support our perceptions. Some blooms appear to be long-term increases in native jellyfish populations. A different phenomenon is demonstrated by jellyfish whose populations regularly fluctuate, apparently with climate, causing periodic blooms. Perhaps the most damaging type of jellyfish increase in recent decades has been caused by populations of new, nonindigenous species gradually building-up to `bloom' levels in some regions. Lest one conclude that the next millennium will feature only increases in jellyfish numbers worldwide, examples are also given in which populations are decreasing in heavily impacted coastal areas. Some jellyfish will undoubtedly fall subject to the ongoing species elimination processes that already portend a vast global loss of biodiversity. Knowledge about the ecology of both the medusa and the polyp phases of each life cycle is necessary if we are to understand the true causes of these increases and decreases, but in most cases where changes in medusa populations have been recognized, we know nothing about the field ecology of the polyps.
    Subject(s): Life Sciences ; nonindigenous species ; scyphomedusae ; biodiversity ; Hydrobiology ; Ctenophora ; hydromedusae ; siphonophore ; Cnidaria ; Ecology ; Fundamental and applied biological sciences. Psychology ; Sea water ecosystems ; Animals ; Synecology ; Animal, plant and microbial ecology ; Protozoa. Invertebrata ; Biological and medical sciences ; Animal and plant ecology ; Demecology
    ISSN: 0018-8158
    E-ISSN: 1573-5117
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives (DFG Nationallizenzen)
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives (Through 1996)
    Source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
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  • 6
    Language: English
    In: Nature (London), 2014-06-05, Vol.510 (7503), p.109-114.e13
    Description: The origins of neural systems remain unresolved. In contrast to other basal metazoans, ctenophores (comb jellies) have both complex nervous and mesoderm-derived muscular systems. These holoplanktonic predators also have sophisticated ciliated locomotion, behaviour and distinct development. Here we present the draft genome of Pleurobrachia bachei, Pacific sea gooseberry, together with ten other ctenophore transcriptomes, and show that they are remarkably distinct from other animal genomes in their content of neurogenic, immune and developmental genes. Our integrative analyses place Ctenophora as the earliest lineage within Metazoa. This hypothesis is supported by comparative analysis of multiple gene families, including the apparent absence of HOX genes, canonical microRNA machinery, and reduced immune complement in ctenophores. Although two distinct nervous systems are well recognized in ctenophores, many bilaterian neuron-specific genes and genes of 'classical' neurotransmitter pathways either are absent or, if present, are not expressed in neurons. Our metabolomic and physiological data are consistent with the hypothesis that ctenophore neural systems, and possibly muscle specification, evolved independently from those in other animals.
    Subject(s): PHYLOGENOMICS ; MAXIMUM-LIKELIHOOD ; DATABASE ; TRANSCRIPTOME ; CLUSTAL-X ; GENES ; CAPILLARY-ELECTROPHORESIS ; COMPLEX BRAINS ; RECEPTORS ; MULTIPLE SEQUENCE ALIGNMENT ; Metabolomics ; Muscles - physiology ; Nervous System - metabolism ; Genome - genetics ; Molecular Sequence Data ; Transcriptome - genetics ; Phylogeny ; Ctenophora - physiology ; Neurotransmitter Agents ; Animals ; Ctenophora - classification ; Ctenophora - genetics ; MicroRNAs ; Mesoderm - metabolism ; Neurons - metabolism ; Genes, Homeobox ; Ctenophora - immunology ; Evolution, Molecular ; Genes, Developmental ; Neural circuitry ; Ctenophora ; Genomics ; Physiological aspects ; Genetic research ; Genetic aspects ; Research ; Natural history ; Index Medicus ; RNA ; Gens
    ISSN: 0028-0836
    E-ISSN: 1476-4687
    Source: Academic Search Ultimate
    Source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
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  • 7
    Language: English
    In: Marine biodiversity, 2018-12, Vol.48 (4), p.1695-1714
    Description: In this review, we present the current state of biodiversity knowledge for the class Staurozoa (Cnidaria), including richness estimates, geographical and bathymetric distributions, substrate use, feeding, behavior, life cycle, and conservation. Based on non-parametric, statistical incidence estimators, the global inventory of 50 known and accepted species of stalked jellyfishes might be regarded as close to complete, but we discuss possible bias related to the lower research effort applied in the Southern Hemisphere. Most of the species occur at mid-latitudes, presenting a distributional pattern that disagrees with the classic pattern of diversity (higher richness near the Equator). Specimens are frequently found on algae, but they have also been reported attached to rocks, seagrasses, shells, mud, sand, coral/gorgonian, sea cucumber, and serpulid tube. Most of the species are found in the intertidal and shallow subtidal regions, but species of Lucernaria have been reported at more than 3000 m deep. Amphipods and copepods are the prey items most frequently reported, and stauromedusae have been observed being actively preyed upon by nudibranch mollusks and pycnogonids. Apparently, stalked jellyfishes have a high sensitivity to anthropic impacts in the environment, and promotion of the class, one of the least studied among Cnidaria, is perhaps the best possible conservation strategy.
    Subject(s): Life Sciences ; Substrate ; Plant Systematics/Taxonomy/Biogeography ; Distribution ; Freshwater & Marine Ecology ; Development ; Stauromedusae ; Behavior ; Biodiversity ; Animal Systematics/Taxonomy/Biogeography ; Feeding ; Analysis ; Biological diversity ; Coastal ecosystems
    ISSN: 1867-1616
    E-ISSN: 1867-1624
    Source: Smithsonian Digital Repository
    Source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
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  • 8
    Language: English
    In: The Lion and the unicorn (Brooklyn), 2010, Vol.34 (3), p.320
    Description: Little Witch Girl attends witch school, where Malachi, a magic bumblebee, helps protect her from bullying by the other witch pupils (jealous that Little Witch Girl resides with the Head Witch of all witches); Little Witch Girl has a birthday party, with Amy and Clarissa as guests; in the climactic chapters of the book, Little Witch Girl comes down to Amy's street on Halloween for trick-or-treating, while Amy, in her Halloween witch costume, takes Little Witch Girl's place in Little Witch Girl's world. That was what Old Witch was doing right then (57). Or after Amy tells Clarissa that Little Witch Girl is arriving late at her first day of Witch School, the narrative voice signals a transition from Amy's introductory conversation with Clarissa into the dramatic action of the chapter by announcing, Today was the little witch girl's first day of school.
    Subject(s): 1900-1999 ; The Witch Family ; morality ; novel ; American literature ; Estes, Eleanor ; Literary criticism ; Childrens literature ; Conversation ; Morality ; Females
    ISSN: 1080-6563
    ISSN: 0147-2593
    E-ISSN: 1080-6563
    Source: Project MUSE - Premium Collection
    Source: MLA International Bibliography with Full Text
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  • 9
    Language: English
    In: PeerJ (San Francisco, CA), 2016, Vol.4, p.e2594-e2594
    Description: Comparative efforts to understand the body plan evolution of stalked jellyfishes are scarce. Most characters, and particularly internal anatomy, have neither been explored for the class Staurozoa, nor broadly applied in its taxonomy and classification. Recently, a molecular phylogenetic hypothesis was derived for Staurozoa, allowing for the first broad histological comparative study of staurozoan taxa. This study uses comparative histology to describe the body plans of nine staurozoan species, inferring functional and evolutionary aspects of internal morphology based on the current phylogeny of Staurozoa. We document rarely-studied structures, such as ostia between radial pockets, intertentacular lobules, gametoducts, pad-like adhesive structures, and white spots of nematocysts (the last four newly proposed putative synapomorphies for Staurozoa). Two different regions of nematogenesis are documented. This work falsifies the view that the peduncle region of stauromedusae only retains polypoid characters; metamorphosis from stauropolyp to stauromedusa occurs both at the apical region (calyx) and basal region (peduncle). Intertentacular lobules, observed previously in only a small number of species, are shown to be widespread. Similarly, gametoducts were documented in all analyzed genera, both in males and females, thereby elucidating gamete release. Finally, ostia connecting adjacent gastric radial pockets appear to be universal for Staurozoa. Detailed histological studies of medusozoan polyps and medusae are necessary to further understand the relationships between staurozoan features and those of other medusozoan cnidarians.
    Subject(s): Phylogeny ; Laboratories ; Taxonomy ; Zoology ; Marine biology ; Museums ; Histology ; Anatomy ; Genera ; Studies ; Nematocysts ; Archives & records ; Polyps (organisms) ; Morphology ; Classification ; Phylogenetics ; Evolution ; Metamorphosis ; Stauromedusae ; Medusozoa ; Nematogenesis
    ISSN: 2167-8359
    E-ISSN: 2167-8359
    Source: Smithsonian Digital Repository
    Source: PubMed Central
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  • 10
    Language: English
    In: Oceanography (Washington, D.C.), 2017-12-01, Vol.30 (4), p.38-47
    Description: Since its founding, the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI) has pioneered unique capabilities for accessing the deep ocean and its inhabitants through focused peer relationships between scientists and engineers. This focus has enabled breakthroughs in our understanding of life in the sea, leading to fundamental advances in describing the biology and the ecology of open-ocean and deep-sea animals. David Packard’s founding principle was the application of technological advances to studying the deep ocean, in part because he recognized the critical importance of this habitat in a global context. Among other fields, MBARI’s science has benefited from applying novel methodologies in molecular biology and genetics, imaging systems, and in situ observations. These technologies have allowed MBARI’s bioluminescence and biodiversity laboratory and worldwide collaborators to address centuries-old questions related to the biodiversity, behavior, and bio-optical properties of organisms living in the water column, from the surface into the deep sea. Many of the most interesting of these phenomena are in the midwater domain—the vast region of ocean between the sunlit surface waters and the deep seafloor.
    Subject(s): Bioluminescence ; Seas ; Animals ; Oceans ; Marine ecology ; Haddock ; Biodiversity ; SPECIAL ISSUE ON Celebrating 30 Years of Ocean Science and Technology at the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute ; Species ; Worms ; Sea water ; Biodiversity and Ecology ; Environmental Sciences
    ISSN: 1042-8275
    E-ISSN: 2377-617X
    Source: Academic Search Ultimate
    Source: Smithsonian Digital Repository
    Source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
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