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  • 1
    In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, May 2010, Vol.19(9‐10), pp.1477-1478
    Description: To authenticate to the full-text of this article, please visit this link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2702.2010.03234.x Byline: Jill Manthorpe Article note: Jill Manthorpe, Professor of Social Work, Social Care Workforce Research Unit, King's College London, Strand, London WC2B 4LL, UK. Telephone: 0044 2078481782. , E-mail: jill.manthorpe@kcl.ac.uk
    Subject(s): Nursing ; Elderly ; Dementia;
    ISSN: 0962-1067
    E-ISSN: 1365-2702
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  • 2
    In: British Journal of Social Work, 2011, Vol. 41(2), pp.224-241
    Description: Serious Case Reviews (SCRs) in respect of vulnerable adults, inquiries conducted by English adult protection or safeguarding boards at local level when harm or death has occurred, have been little scrutinised. This article reports an analysis of twenty-two SCR reports exploring: rationale for the review; detail of victim(s), alleged abuser(s) and setting(s); form of abuse (covering also neglect); threshold for the SCR; review personnel; purpose(s); processes or methodology; cost; timescale; lessons or recommendations; and follow-up. Reflections on SCRs are provided in the context of the current review of adult safeguarding policy in England, which received calls for the activity of SCRs to be more consistent and for lessons learned to be analysed and more widely circulated among social workers, other professionals, regulators and policy makers.
    Subject(s): Serious Case Reviews ; Adult Safeguarding ; Adult Protection ; Inquiries ; Adult Abuse ; Policy
    ISSN: 0045-3102
    E-ISSN: 1468-263X
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  • 3
    In: British Journal of Social Work, 2015, Vol. 45(1), pp.331-348
    Description: Serious Case Reviews (SCRs) for adults are commissioned to examine the ways in which local professionals and agencies worked together to safeguard a vulnerable adult or take place following harm or death of a vulnerable adult where there are concerns about agencies' actions or engagement. There is no national system in England for their collation or analysis. This paper presents the results of a study investigating SCRs for vulnerable adults where the person who was at risk of harm, harmed or died had a learning disability. Eighteen SCRs were identified and a further three where there are grounds for considering that the victim may have had such a disability. Three themes are presented: staff relationships; family and carers; and biography and chronology to draw out material relevant to social work policy and practice. At a time when the English government has announced plans for SCRs for adults to move to a statutory basis, this paper draws attention to their potential as learning materials, but also the risks of seeing them as presenting a full picture of practice. The case for local flexibility is argued.
    Subject(s): Serious Case Reviews ; Learning Disability ; Adult Safeguarding ; Social Work
    ISSN: 0045-3102
    E-ISSN: 1468-263X
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  • 4
    In: British Journal of Social Work, 2011, Vol. 41(1), pp.131-147
    Description: Although suicide remains an uncommon event among older people in most developed countries, suicide rates do increase with age, mainly accounted for by the higher incidence among older men. A critical interpretive synthesis review that emphasises practitioner perspectives reveals three problems: (i) a scarcity of research that takes a system-wide approach to suicide prevention in later life; (ii) a dearth of evidence about the social work contribution to reducing the risk of suicide in later life; and (iii) a noticeable absence of reference to social work practice in national guidelines for mental health practitioners. This absence of social work services from studies about later life suicide arises partly from concentration on medical, nursing and psychological literature and partly from the use of a hierarchy of evidence that grades research by quality of the science and stands to miss accounts of practice, let alone the experiences of older people. This article suggests that emphasis should be given to guideline development, and to improving sub-optimal care and support. These actions would use social work skills in opening channels of communication between other professionals; communicating with carers; advocating on behalf of individuals with mental health problems; and offering acceptable and accessible support.
    Subject(s): Older People ; Suicide ; Social Work ; Social Care
    ISSN: 0045-3102
    E-ISSN: 1468-263X
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  • 5
    In: British Journal of Social Work, 2012, Vol. 42(8), pp.1495-1512
    Description: Options relating to housing with care will likely increase, as they potentially promote choice and independence. If housing with care services offer end-of-life care to their service users, their staff will need to engage with social workers and other professional networks and these professionals will need to understand the context and ethos of housing with care provision. In order to investigate whether existing literature will assist professional communication across sectors, a scoping literature review was conducted incorporating three stages: (i) database searches, (ii) harvesting further literature, and (iii) data extraction and analysis. Findings were grouped into themes, according to the project brief, focusing on: confidence and skills, making decisions and plans, and access to support and training. Several elements were identified as potentially supportive of staff confidence, such as obtaining biographical information, mutually respectful working relationships, managerial support and better understanding of specialist communication needs. There are research gaps in knowledge and understanding of day-to-day communication and decision making.
    Subject(s): Older People ; Housing ; Decision Making ; Communication ; Scoping Review
    ISSN: 0045-3102
    E-ISSN: 1468-263X
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  • 6
    In: International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, April 2015, Vol.30(4), pp.384-392
    Description: To purchase or authenticate to the full-text of this article, please visit this link: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/gps.4147/abstract Byline: Jill Manthorpe, Kritika Samsi Objectives Implemented in 2007, the Mental Capacity Act (MCA) 2005 codified decision-making for adults unable to make decisions for themselves in England and Wales. Among other changes, two new offences of wilful neglect and ill-treatment were created under Section 44. Our study explored how the MCA was being implemented in community-based dementia care, focusing on frontline practice. Method Using qualitative longitudinal methodology, we interviewed 279 practitioners, in the London and South-East area of England, two or three times over 3years. We applied framework analysis to identify and delineate recurrent themes. Results Views of the new offences were positive overall, but understanding ranged from partial to non-existent among some participants. Conclusions Clinicians may be increasingly called upon to provide advice on whether an alleged victim or perpetrator lacks decision-making capacity in cases of suspected elder abuse. They need to be aware of the new criminal offences to ensure that people with dementia, among others, are not abused and that abusers are brought to account. Copyright [c] 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
    Subject(s): Elder Abuse ; Mental Capacity ; Dementia: Crime
    ISSN: 0885-6230
    E-ISSN: 1099-1166
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  • 7
    Language: English
    In: British journal of social work, March 2016, Vol.46(2), p.514
    Description: Adult Serious Case Reviews (SCRs) are commissioned by local Safeguarding Boards to investigate how local professionals and agencies worked together to safeguard a vulnerable adult following an incident of abuse, harm or death if the Board identifies concerns about agencies' actions from which lessons may be learned. This paper presents the results of a study undertaken in 2013 analysing Adult SCRs where the person who was at risk of harm, or had been harmed or died, had a dementia. Of the eighty-four SCRs available, fourteen were identified as involving a person with dementia and in a further seven the victim(s) may have had dementia. Discrete themes are presented: the situation of self- or publicly funded residents; the potential of poor care quality in all settings for people with dementia, and by different staff and family carers; the lack of communication with family members; and poor integration of care for people with dementia. The SCRs provide vivid illustrations of the 'faultlines' that may exist in dementia support systems. In England, Adult SCRs are moving to a statutory basis under the Care Act 2014 and this paper draws attention to their potential as learning materials in dementia care for commissioners, for social workers and for safeguarding practice. Reprinted by permission of Oxford University Press
    Subject(s): Dementia ; Caring ; Social Workers ; Legislation ; Adult Abuse & Neglect ; Families & Family Life ; Quality of Care ; United Kingdom–UK
    ISSN: 0045-3102
    Source: © ProQuest LLC All rights reserved〈img src="https://exlibris-pub.s3.amazonaws.com/PQ_Logo.jpg" style="vertical-align:middle;margin-left:7px"〉
    Source: International Bibliography of the Social Sciences
    Source: International Bibliography of the Social Sciences (IBSS)
    Source: ProQuest Business Collection
    Source: ProQuest Politics Collection
    Source: ProQuest Social Sciences Premium Collection
    Source: ProQuest Sociology Collection
    Source: Social Science Premium Collection
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  • 8
    In: British Journal of Social Work, 2013, Vol. 43(5), pp.889-903
    Description: The shift within publicly funded social care towards personal budgets and Direct Payments may present some risks as well as advantages to people with dementia. Fifteen Adult Safeguarding Coordinators were interviewed in 2011, building on earlier interviews. Thematic analysis was used to identify three main consistencies in response. Most participants saw personal budgets as potentially risky , but outlined ways in which these risks could be minimised and felt that the principles of risk empowerment could be used by practitioners to support people with dementia, carers and care staff and enable greater protection against financial abuse. Principles of the Mental Capacity Act were seen as offering some safeguards for when an individual lacks capacity, but not when they are vulnerable, mildly confused and less vigilant. Alongside a need for social work practitioners to be more alert to signs and risks of financial abuse, safeguarding practitioners urged regular reviews and monitoring that flag up inconsistencies in spending patterns. If not, system neglect may add to individual cases of abuse.
    Subject(s): Personal Budgets ; Direct Payments ; Financial Abuse ; Dementia ; Mental Capacity ; Safeguarding
    ISSN: 0045-3102
    E-ISSN: 1468-263X
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  • 9
    In: The British Journal of Social Work, 2014, Vol. 44(8), pp.2325-2341
    Description: Deafblindness is a particularly complex impairment and deafblind people are considered to be some of the most vulnerable members of society; this includes vulnerability to abuse and harm. This paper explores this unique impairment in the illustrative case of Beverley Lewis, by reviewing archived published and audio material about the life and circumstances of the death of this young woman, including media reports, parliamentary debates and commentaries. Whilst it appears that the implications of Beverley's deafblindness may have been ‘overshadowed’ in media reports and inquiries, the paper suggests that further lessons for practice can be learned from the case by focusing on this condition. Drawing on contemporary research by specialist charitable organisations (Sense and Deafblind UK), the authors identify research highlighting deficiencies in support for many deafblind adults, which have implications for safeguarding policy and practice. It is concluded that attention is needed in three areas: increased awareness amongst social care and health practitioners of the particular vulnerability to abuse of deafblind adults; improved access to specialist assessment and specialist social care support, including one-to-one human support; and improved communication between social care and health agencies, alongside more tangible signs of acceptance of shared responsibility for supporting deafblind adults.
    Subject(s): Deafblind ; Vulnerability ; Abuse ; Safeguarding ; Beverley Lewis
    ISSN: 0045-3102
    E-ISSN: 1468-263X
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  • 10
    In: British Journal of Social Work, 2016, Vol. 46(7), pp.2016-2032
    Description: In spring 2012, the first cohort of trainees ( n = 168) qualified as social workers through a new English fast-track, employer-led programme: Step Up to Social Work (SUSW). This paper reports findings from a survey of this first cohort undertaken in 2014. Of the 145 approached, 138 responded (95 per cent response rate). Survey responses were analysed using SPSS version 21 and the free-text responses were explored thematically using the Framework approach. Of the 130 respondents who started working in children’s social work departments on qualification, 106 were still employed in such settings two and a half years later and 76 were working where they had trained. Of the 115 respondents working in England as social workers at the time of the survey, just under a third were intending to stay for the next year while over half were planning to stay in their current post for between one and four years. These data provide the first indications of the employment and career intentions of this first cohort of SUSW graduates. In light of further investment in England in fast-track training, these findings provide a baseline. They suggest ways for those delivering new training routes to consider graduates’ perspectives and experiences and provide the opportunity to begin to measure the effectiveness of the route on retention.
    Subject(s): Step Up To Social Work ; Social Work Training ; Fast Track ; Preparation For Practice ; Retention
    ISSN: 0045-3102
    E-ISSN: 1468-263X
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