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  • 1
    Article
    Article
    2010
    ISSN: 0162-2439 
    Language: English
    In: Science, technology, & human values, 2010-09-01, Vol.35 (5), p.601-617
    Description: There are three components to boundary objects as outlined in the original 1989 article. Interpretive flexibility, the structure of informatic and work process needs and arrangements, and, finally, the dynamic between ill-structured and more tailored uses of the objects. Much of the use of the concept has concentrated on the aspect of interpretive flexibility and has often mistaken or conflated this flexibility with the process of tacking back-and-forth between the ill-structured and well-structured aspects of the arrangements. Boundary objects are not useful at just any level of scale or without full consideration of the entire model. The article discusses these aspects of the architecture of boundary objects and includes a discussion of one of the ways that boundary objects appeared as a concept in earlier work done by Star. It concludes with methodological considerations about how to study the system of boundary objects and infrastructure.
    Subject(s): Astronomical objects ; Boundary objects ; Communities ; Marginalization ; Collaboration ; Standardization ; Infrastructure ; Biology ; Ecology ; Archives ; History of science in relation to other disciplinary fields ; General points ; History of science and technology ; Sociology ; Philosophy ; Grounded theory ; Research ; Models ; Information ; Flexibility
    ISSN: 0162-2439
    E-ISSN: 1552-8251
    Source: International Bibliography of the Social Sciences (IBSS)
    Source: JSTOR Arts & Sciences II
    Source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
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  • 2
    Book
    Book
    2017
    ISBN: 9783839431269  ISBN: 3732831264  ISBN: 3837631265  ISBN: 3839431263  ISBN: 9783732831265  ISBN: 9783837631265 
    Language: German
    Description: Susan Leigh Star's (1954-2010) research encompasses aspects of infrastructural and social theory, knowledge ecologies, feminism and theories of marginality. For the first time, this volume introduces the American science and technology sociologist's most important writings in German. Her texts on border objects, marginality, infrastructures and standards are commented upon by academics and scientists in these fields, and analyzed for their relevance to media studies. With commentaries by Geoffrey C. Bowker, Cora Bender, Ulrike Bergermann, Monika Dommann, Christine Hanke, Bernhard Nett, Jörg Potthast, Gabriele Schabacher, Cornelius Schubert, Erhard Schüttpelz and Jörg Strübing.
    Subject(s): technologie ; infrastruktur ; sociology of media ; boundary objects ; susan leigh star ; media ; technology ; media studies ; medientheorie ; standards ; medienwissenschaft ; media theory ; infrastructure ; medien ; science and technology studies ; mediensoziologie ; grenzobjekte
    ISBN: 9783839431269
    ISBN: 3732831264
    ISBN: 3837631265
    ISBN: 3839431263
    ISBN: 9783732831265
    ISBN: 9783837631265
    Source: De Gruyter eBooks
    Source: De Gruyter Open Access Books
    Source: DOAB: Directory of Open Access Books
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  • 3
    Article
    Article
    2018
    ISSN: 1763-0061 
    Language: English
    In: Tracés (Lyons, France), 2018-12-04, Vol.35 (35), p.187-206
    Description: This article asks methodological questions about studying infrastructure with some of the tools and perspectives of ethnography. Infrastructure is both relational and ecological – it means different things to different groups and it is part of the balance of action, tools, and the built environment, inseparable from them. It also is frequently mundane to the point of boredom, involving things such as plugs, standards, and bureaucratic forms. Some of the difficulties of studying infrastructure are how to scale up from traditional ethnographic sites, how to manage large quantities of data such as those produced by transaction logs, and how to understand the interplay of online and offline behavior. Some of the tricks of the trade involved in meeting these challenges include studying the design of infrastructure, understanding the paradoxes of infrastructure as both transparent and opaque, including invisible work in the ecological analysis, and pinpointing the epistemological status of indicators.
    Subject(s): standard ; infrastructures ; information technology ; infrastructure ; ethnography ; methodology
    ISSN: 1763-0061
    E-ISSN: 1963-1812
    Source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
    Source: DOAJ Directory of Open Access Journals - Not for CDI Discovery
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  • 4
    Language: English
    In: Computer supported cooperative work, 1999-03, Vol.8 (1), p.9-30
    Description: No work is inherently either visible or invisible. We always “see” work through a selection of indicators: straining muscles, finished artifacts, a changed state of affairs. The indicators change with context, and that context becomes a negotiation about the relationship between visible and invisible work. With shifts in industrial practice these negotiations require longer chains of inference and representation, and may become solely abstract.This article provides a framework for analyzing invisible work in CSCW systems. We sample across a variety of kinds of work to enrich the understanding of how invisibility and visibility operate. Processes examined include creating a “non-person” in domestic work; disembedding background work; and going backstage. Understanding these processes may inform the design of CSCW systems and the development of related social theory.
    Subject(s): requirements analysis ; articulation work ; Interdisciplinary Studies ; social informatics ; feminism ; Social Sciences, general ; Psychology, general ; cooperative work ; Humanities / Arts / Design ; Computer Science, general ; Communication ; invisible work ; Muscles ; Artifacts ; Visibility ; Indicators ; Negotiations
    ISSN: 0925-9724
    E-ISSN: 1573-7551
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives (DFG Nationallizenzen)
    Source: Academic Search Ultimate
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives (Through 1996)
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives Complete
    Source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
    Source: ProQuest Central
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  • 5
    Language: English
    In: Information systems research, 1996-03-01, Vol.7 (1), p.111-134
    Description: We analyze a large-scale custom software effort, the Worm Community System (WCS), a collaborative system designed for a geographically dispersed community of geneticists. There were complex challenges in creating this infrastructural tool, ranging from simple lack of resources to complex organizational and intellectual communication failures and tradeoffs. Despite high user satisfaction with the system and interface, and extensive user needs assessment, feedback, and analysis, many users experienced difficulties in signing on and use. The study was conducted during a time of unprecedented growth in the Internet and its utilities (1991–1994), and many respondents turned to the World Wide Web for their information exchange. Using Bateson's model of levels of learning, we analyze the levels of infrastructural complexity involved in system access and designer-user communication. We analyze the connection between systems development aimed at supporting specific forms of collaborative knowledge work, local organizational transformation, and large-scale infrastructural change.
    Subject(s): organizational computing ; scientific computing ; infrastructure ; collaboratory ; participatory design ; ethnography ; internet ; Databases ; Communities ; Computer software ; Buildings ; Information storage and retrieval systems ; Infrastructure ; Ecology ; Biology ; Information technology ; Worms ; Studies ; End users ; Organizational behavior ; Information retrieval ; Models ; Systems development
    ISSN: 1047-7047
    E-ISSN: 1526-5536
    Source: JSTOR Arts & Sciences X
    Source: Business Source Ultimate
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  • 6
    Article
    Article
    1999
    ISSN: 0002-7642 
    Language: English
    In: The American behavioral scientist (Beverly Hills), 1999-11, Vol.43 (3), p.377-391
    Description: This article asks methodological questions about studying infrastructure with some of the tools and perspectives of ethnography. Infrastructure is both relational and ecological—it means different things to different groups and it is part of the balance of action, tools, and the built environment, inseparable from them. It also is frequently mundane to the point of boredom, involving things such as plugs, standards, and bureaucratic forms. Some of the difficulties of studying infrastructure are how to scale up from traditional ethnographic sites, how to manage large quantities of data such as those produced by transaction logs, and how to understand the interplay of online and offline behavior. Some of the tricks of the trade involved in meeting these challenges include studying the design of infrastructure, understanding the paradoxes of infrastructure as both transparent and opaque, including invisible work in the ecological analysis, and pinpointing the epistemological status of indictors.
    Subject(s): Infrastructure (Economics) ; Analysis ; Ethnology ; Influence ; Knowledge, Theory of ; Ecological research ; Methods ; Infrastructure ; Ethnography ; Built environment ; Information systems ; Powell, Jerome
    ISSN: 0002-7642
    E-ISSN: 1552-3381
    Source: International Bibliography of the Social Sciences (IBSS)
    Source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
    Source: Sociological Abstracts
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  • 7
    Language: English
    In: Ethics and information technology, 2007-12, Vol.9 (4), p.273-280
    Description: Residual categories are those which cannot be formally represented within a given classification system. We examine the forms that residuality takes within our information systems today, and explore some silences which form around those inhabiting particular residual categories. We argue that there is significant ethical and political work to be done in exploring residuality.
    Subject(s): Technology Management ; residual categories ; lived experience ; Management of Computing and Information Systems ; classification ; invisible work ; Ethics ; chronic illness ; Computer Science ; User Interfaces and Human Computer Interaction ; Library Science ; information systems ; silence ; Information science. Documentation ; Library and information science. General aspects ; Legal aspects : intellectual property, producer responsability. Ethics ; Exact sciences and technology ; Information and communication sciences ; Legal aspects : intellectual property, producer responsability ; Sciences and techniques of general use ; Studies ; Classification ; Mathematical models ; Chronic illnesses ; Communication ; Information systems
    ISSN: 1388-1957
    E-ISSN: 1572-8439
    Source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
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  • 8
    Language: English
    In: Science Communication, 2008-06, Vol.29 (4), p.532-534
    ISSN: 1075-5470
    E-ISSN: 1552-8545
    Source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
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  • 9
    Language: English
    In: Social studies of science, 1989-08-01, Vol.19 (3), p.387-420
    Description: Scientific work is heterogeneous, requiring many different actors and viewpoints. It also requires cooperation. The two create tension between divergent viewpoints and the need for generalizable findings. We present a model of how one group of actors managed this tension. It draws on the work of amateurs, professionals, administrators and others connected to the Museum of Vertebrate Zoology at the University of California, Berkeley, during its early years. Extending the Latour-Callon model of interessement, two major activities are central for translating between viewpoints: standardization of methods, and the development of 'boundary objects'. Boundary objects are both adaptable to different viewpoints and robust enough to maintain identity across them. We distinguish four types of boundary objects: repositories, ideal types, coincident boundaries and standardized forms.
    Subject(s): Vertebrates ; Animals ; Ecological genetics ; Boundary objects ; Zoology ; Museum administration ; Ecology ; Biology ; University administration ; Natural history
    ISSN: 0306-3127
    E-ISSN: 1460-3659
    Source: JSTOR Arts & Sciences II
    Source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
    Source: Sociological Abstracts
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  • 10
    Book
    Book
    2017
    ISBN: 9783839431269  ISBN: 3839431263 
    Language: German
    Description: Susan Leigh Stars (1954-2010) Werk bewegt sich zwischen Infrastrukturforschung, Sozialtheorie, Wissenschaftsgeschichte, Ökologie und Feminismus. Die wegweisenden historischen und ethnografischen Texte der US-amerikanischen Technik- und Wissenschaftssoziologin liegen mit diesem Band erstmals gesammelt auf Deutsch vor. Ihre Arbeiten zu Grenzobjekten, Marginalität, Arbeit, Infrastrukturen und Praxisgemeinschaften werden interdisziplinär kommentiert und auf ihre medienwissenschaftliche Produktivität hin befragt.Mit Kommentaren von Geoffrey C. Bowker, Cora Bender, Ulrike Bergermann, Monika Dommann, Christine Hanke, Bernhard Nett, Jörg Potthast, Gabriele Schabacher, Cornelius Schubert, Erhard Schüttpelz und Jörg Strübing.
    Subject(s): Media Studies ; Social Science
    ISBN: 9783839431269
    ISBN: 3839431263
    Source: De Gruyter eBooks
    Source: De Gruyter Open Access Books
    Source: DOAB: Directory of Open Access Books
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