placeholder
and
and

Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Export
Filter
Document type
Language
Year
  • 1
    Language: English
    In: Analytical chemistry (Washington), 2012-01-03, Vol.84 (1), p.283-289
    Description: Liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry is routinely used for metabolomics experiments. In contrast to the fairly routine and automated data acquisition steps, subsequent compound annotation and identification require extensive manual analysis and thus form a major bottleneck in data interpretation. Here we present CAMERA, a Bioconductor package integrating algorithms to extract compound spectra, annotate isotope and adduct peaks, and propose the accurate compound mass even in highly complex data. To evaluate the algorithms, we compared the annotation of CAMERA against a manually defined annotation for a mixture of known compounds spiked into a complex matrix at different concentrations. CAMERA successfully extracted accurate masses for 89.7% and 90.3% of the annotatable compounds in positive and negative ion modes, respectively. Furthermore, we present a novel annotation approach that combines spectral information of data acquired in opposite ion modes to further improve the annotation rate. We demonstrate the utility of CAMERA in two different, easily adoptable plant metabolomics experiments, where the application of CAMERA drastically reduced the amount of manual analysis.
    Subject(s): Algorithms ; Analytical chemistry ; Chemistry ; Chromatographic methods and physical methods associated with chromatography ; Chromatography ; Chromatography, Liquid - methods ; Exact sciences and technology ; Extraction (Chemistry) ; Ions ; Isotopes ; Liquid chromatography ; Mass spectrometry ; Metabolomics ; Methods ; Other chromatographic methods ; Plants - chemistry ; Spectrometric and optical methods ; Spectrometry, Mass, Electrospray Ionization - methods ; Usage
    ISSN: 0003-2700
    E-ISSN: 1520-6882
    Source: Hellenic Academic Libraries Link
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    Language: English
    In: The Plant cell, 2010-05-01, Vol.22 (5), p.1549-1563
    Description: The process of dark-induced senescence in plants is relatively poorly understood, but a functional electron-transfer flavoprotein/electron-transfer flavoprotein:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (ETF/ETFQO) complex, which supports respiration during carbon starvation, has recently been identified. Here, we studied the responses of Arabidopsis thaliana mutants deficient in the expression of isovaleryl-CoA dehydrogenase and 2-hydroxyglutarate dehydrogenase to extended darkness and other environmental stresses. Evaluations of the mutant phenotypes following carbon starvation induced by extended darkness identify similarities to those exhibited by mutants of the ETF/ETFQO complex. Metabolic profiling and isotope tracer experimentation revealed that isovaleryl-CoA dehydrogenase is involved in degradation of the branched-chain amino acids, phytol, and Lys, while 2-hydroxyglutarate dehydrogenase is involved exclusively in Lys degradation. These results suggest that isovaleryl-CoA dehydrogenase is the more critical for alternative respiration and that a series of enzymes, including 2-hydroxyglutarate dehydrogenase, plays a role in Lys degradation. Both physiological and metabolic phenotypes of the isovaleryl-CoA dehydrogenase and 2-hydroxyglutarate dehydrogenase mutants were not as severe as those observed for mutants of the ETF/ETFQO complex, indicating some functional redundancy of the enzymes within the process. Our results aid in the elucidation of the pathway of plant Lys catabolism and demonstrate that both isovaleryl-CoA dehydrogenase and 2-hydroxyglutarate dehydrogenase act as electron donors to the ubiquinol pool via an ETF/ETFQO-mediated route.
    Subject(s): Acyl Coenzyme A - metabolism ; Alcohol Oxidoreductases - metabolism ; Amino acid metabolism ; Amino acids ; Arabidopsis - enzymology ; Arabidopsis thaliana ; Carbohydrate Metabolism ; Catabolism ; Chlorophylls ; Darkness ; Dehydrogenases ; DNA, Bacterial - genetics ; Electron Transport ; Electrons ; Enzymes ; Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry ; Genetic aspects ; Glutamine ; Growth ; Isotope Labeling ; Isovaleryl-CoA Dehydrogenase - metabolism ; Leaves ; Leucine - metabolism ; Lysine - metabolism ; Metabolome ; Mitochondria - enzymology ; Models, Biological ; Mutagenesis, Insertional - genetics ; Mutation - genetics ; Observations ; Phenotype ; Phenotypes ; Phytol - metabolism ; Plant cells ; Plant Leaves - metabolism ; Plant mitochondria ; Plants ; Properties
    ISSN: 1040-4651
    E-ISSN: 1532-298X
    Source: JSTOR Life Sciences
    Source: JSTOR Ecology & Botany II
    Source: Elektronische Zeitschriftenbibliothek - Frei zugängliche E-Journals
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 3
    Language: English
    In: The Plant cell, 2011-02-01, Vol.23 (2), p.583-599
    Description: Arabidopsis thaliana COMATOSE (CTS) encodes an ABC transporter involved in peroxisomal import of substrates for β-oxidation. Various cts alleles and mutants disrupted in steps of peroxisomal β-oxidation have previously been reported to exhibit a severe block on seed germination. Oxylipin analysis on cts, acyl CoA oxidase1 acyl CoA oxidase2 (acx1 acx2), and keto acyl thiolase2 dry seeds revealed that they contain elevated levels of 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid (OPDA), jasmonic acid (JA), and JA-lle. Oxylipin and transcriptomic analysis showed that accumulation of these oxylipins occurs during late seed maturation in cts. Analysis of double mutants generated by crossing cts with mutants in the JA biosynthesis pathway indicate that OPDA, rather than JA or JA-lle, contributes to the block on germination in cts seeds. We found that OPDA was more effective at inhibiting wild-type germination than was JA and that this effect was independent of CORONATINE INSENSITIVE1 but was synergistic with abscisic acid (ABA). Consistent with this, OPDA treatment increased ABA INSENSITIVE5 protein abundance in a manner that parallels the inhibitory effect of OPDA and OPDA+ABA on seed germination. These results demonstrate that OPDA acts along with ABA to regulate seed germination in Arabidopsis.
    Subject(s): Abscisic Acid - metabolism ; Analysis ; Arabidopsis - drug effects ; Arabidopsis - genetics ; Arabidopsis - growth & development ; Arabidopsis thaliana ; Baker, Alison ; Biosynthesis ; Cyclopentanes - metabolism ; Endosperm ; Fatty acids ; Fatty Acids, Unsaturated - pharmacology ; Gene expression regulation ; Gene Expression Regulation, Developmental ; Gene Expression Regulation, Plant ; Genes ; Germination ; Germination - drug effects ; Mutation ; Oxylipins - metabolism ; Phenotypes ; Plant cells ; Seed germination ; Seeds ; Seeds - drug effects ; Seeds - growth & development
    ISSN: 1040-4651
    E-ISSN: 1532-298X
    Source: JSTOR Life Sciences
    Source: JSTOR Ecology & Botany II
    Source: Elektronische Zeitschriftenbibliothek - Frei zugängliche E-Journals
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 4
    Language: English
    In: Science (American Association for the Advancement of Science), 2015-07-17, Vol.349 (6245), p.309-312
    Description: Morphinan alkaloids from the opium poppy are used for pain relief. The direction of metabolites to morphinan biosynthesis requires isomerization of (S)- to (R)-reticuline. Characterization of high-reticuline poppy mutants revealed a genetic locus, designated STORR [(S)- to (R)-reticuline] that encodes both cytochrome P450 and oxidoreductase modules, the latter belonging to the aldo-keto reductase family. Metabolite analysis of mutant alleles and heterologous expression demonstrate that the P450 module is responsible for the conversion of (S)-reticuline to 1,2-dehydroreticuline, whereas the oxidoreductase module converts 1,2-dehydroreticuline to (R)-reticuline rather than functioning as a P450 redox partner. Proteomic analysis confirmed that these two modules are contained on a single polypeptide in vivo. This modular assembly implies a selection pressure favoring substrate channeling. The fusion protein STORR may enable microbial-based morphinan production.
    Subject(s): Biosynthesis ; Enzymes ; Metabolites ; Modules ; Morphine ; Narcotics ; Pathways ; Poppies ; Proteins ; REPORTS
    ISSN: 0036-8075
    E-ISSN: 1095-9203
    Source: JSTOR Life Sciences
    Source: Academic Search Ultimate
    Source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
    Source: Get It Now
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 5
    Language: English
    In: PloS one, 2012, Vol.7 (2), p.e30100-e30100
    Description: Storage triacylglycerols in castor bean seeds are enriched in the hydroxylated fatty acid ricinoleate. Extensive tissue-specific RNA-Seq transcriptome and lipid analysis will help identify components important for its biosynthesis. Storage triacylglycerols (TAGs) in the endosperm of developing castor (Ricinus communis) seeds are highly enriched in ricinoleic acid (18:1-OH). We have analysed neutral lipid fractions from other castor tissues using TLC, GLC and mass spectrometry. Cotyledons, like the endosperm, contain high levels of 18:1-OH in TAG. Pollen and male developing flowers accumulate TAG but do not contain 18:1-OH and leaves do not contain TAG or 18:1-OH. Analysis of acyl-CoAs in developing endosperm shows that ricinoleoyl-CoA is not the dominant acyl-CoA, indicating that either metabolic channelling or enzyme substrate selectivity are important in the synthesis of tri-ricinolein in this tissue. RNA-Seq transcriptomic analysis, using Illumina sequencing by synthesis technology, has been performed on mRNA isolated from two stages of developing seeds, germinating seeds, leaf and pollen-producing male flowers in order to identify differences in lipid-metabolic pathways and enzyme isoforms which could be important in the biosynthesis of TAG enriched in 18:1-OH. This study gives comprehensive coverage of gene expression in a variety of different castor tissues. The potential role of differentially expressed genes is discussed against a background of proteins identified in the endoplasmic reticulum, which is the site of TAG biosynthesis, and transgenic studies aimed at increasing the ricinoleic acid content of TAG. Several of the genes identified in this tissue-specific whole transcriptome study have been used in transgenic plant research aimed at increasing the level of ricinoleic acid in TAG. New candidate genes have been identified which might further improve the level of ricinoleic acid in transgenic crops.
    Subject(s): Agriculture ; Base Sequence ; Biology ; Biosynthesis ; Biosynthetic Pathways - genetics ; Castor Bean - enzymology ; Castor Bean - genetics ; Channeling ; Cotyledons ; Databases ; DNA sequencing ; Endoplasmic reticulum ; Endosperm ; Enrichment ; Enzymes ; Fatty acids ; Flowers ; Gene expression ; Gene sequencing ; Genes ; Genetic engineering ; Genetically modified plants ; Genomes ; Genomics ; Germination ; Glycerol ; Isoforms ; Leaves ; Lipids ; Mass spectrometry ; Mass spectroscopy ; Metabolic pathways ; Metabolism ; Nucleotide sequencing ; Organ Specificity ; Pathways ; Phosphatase ; Plants, Genetically Modified ; Pollen ; Proteins ; Ribonucleic acid ; Ricinoleic acid ; Ricinoleic Acids ; RNA ; RNA sequencing ; Seeds ; Selectivity ; Storage ; Tags ; Tissues ; Transcriptome - genetics ; Transgenic plants ; Triglycerides ; Triglycerides - biosynthesis
    ISSN: 1932-6203
    E-ISSN: 1932-6203
    Source: Academic Search Ultimate
    Source: PubMed Central
    Source: DOAJ Directory of Open Access Journals - Not for CDI Discovery
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 6
    Language: English
    In: Science (American Association for the Advancement of Science), 2012-06-29, Vol.336 (6089), p.1704-1708
    Description: Noscapine is an antitumor alkaloid from opium poppy that binds tubulin, arrests metaphase, and induces apoptosis in dividing human cells. Elucidation of the biosynthetic pathway will enable improvement in the commercial production of noscapine and related bioactive molecules. Transcriptomic analysis revealed the exclusive expression of 10 genes encoding five distinct enzyme classes in a high noscapine-producing poppy variety, HN1. Analysis of an F₂ mapping population indicated that these genes are tightly linked in HN1, and bacterial artificial chromosome sequencing confirmed that they exist as a complex gene cluster for plant alkaloids. Virus-induced gene silencing resulted in accumulation of pathway intermediates, allowing gene function to be linked to noscapine synthesis and a novel biosynthetic pathway to be proposed.
    Subject(s): Alkaloids ; Anticancer properties ; Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic - biosynthesis ; Biological and medical sciences ; Biosynthesis ; Capsules ; Classical genetics, quantitative genetics, hybrids ; Clusters ; Cough ; Enzymes ; Flowers & plants ; Fundamental and applied biological sciences. Psychology ; Gene silencing ; Genes ; Genes, Plant ; Genetic aspects ; Genetics of eukaryotes. Biological and molecular evolution ; Genomes ; Latex ; Libraries ; Low level ; Molecular Sequence Data ; Morphinans ; Multigene Family ; Narcotics ; Noscapine - metabolism ; Open reading frames ; Papaver - enzymology ; Papaver - genetics ; Papaver - metabolism ; Papaver somniferum ; Pharmaceutical sciences ; Physiological aspects ; Plant biology ; Poppies ; Pteridophyta, spermatophyta ; REPORTS ; Synthesis ; Vegetals
    ISSN: 0036-8075
    E-ISSN: 1095-9203
    Source: JSTOR Life Sciences
    Source: Academic Search Ultimate
    Source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
    Source: Get It Now
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 7
    Language: English
    In: BMC microbiology, 2010-02-18, Vol.10 (1), p.52-52
    Description: Health-promoting polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) are abundant in forages grazed by ruminants and in vegetable and fish oils used as dietary supplements, but only a small proportion of PUFA finds its way into meat and milk, because of biohydrogenation in the rumen. Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens plays a major role in this activity. The aim of this study was to investigate the mechanisms by which PUFA affect the growth of B. fibrisolvens, how PUFA are metabolized and the metabolic response to growth in the presence of PUFA. Linoleic acid (LA; cis-9, cis-12-18:2) and alpha-linolenic acid (LNA; cis-9, cis-12, cis-15-18:3) increased the lag phase of B. fibrisolvens JW11, LNA having the greater effect. Growth was initiated only when the PUFA had been converted to vaccenic acid (VA; trans-11-18:1). The major fish oil fatty acids, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA; 20:5(n-3)) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA; 22:6(n-3)), were not metabolized and prevented growth. Cellular integrity, as determined fluorimetrically by propidium iodide (PI) ingression, was affected as much by 18:1 fatty acids, including VA, as 18:2 fatty acids. The methyl esters of LNA, LA, EPA and DHA had no effect on growth or other measurements. The ATP pool decreased by 2/3 when LA was added to growing bacteria, whereas most acyl CoA pools decreased by 〉96%. It was concluded that biohydrogenation occurs to enable B. fibrisolvens to survive the bacteriostatic effects of PUFA, and that the toxicity of PUFA is probably mediated via a metabolic effect rather than disruption of membrane integrity.
    Subject(s): Acyl Coenzyme A - analysis ; Adenosine Triphosphate - analysis ; Animals ; Butyrivibrio - drug effects ; Butyrivibrio - metabolism ; Cell Membrane - drug effects ; Culture Media ; Fatty Acids, Unsaturated - metabolism ; Fatty Acids, Unsaturated - pharmacology ; Flow Cytometry ; Growth ; Hydrogenation ; Linoleic Acid - metabolism ; Linoleic Acid - pharmacology ; Lipid Metabolism ; Microbial metabolism ; Microbiota (Symbiotic organisms) ; Physiological aspects ; Research article ; Sheep - microbiology ; Sodium Lactate - pharmacology ; Unsaturated fatty acids
    ISSN: 1471-2180
    E-ISSN: 1471-2180
    Source: BioMedCentral Open Access
    Source: Academic Search Ultimate
    Source: PubMed Central
    Source: DOAJ Directory of Open Access Journals - Not for CDI Discovery
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 8
    Language: English
    In: Plant, cell and environment, 2018-10, Vol.41 (10), p.2357-2372
    Description: Understanding the interactions between mineral nutrition and disease is essential for crop management. Our previous studies with Arabidopsis thaliana demonstrated that potassium (K) deprivation induced the biosynthesis of jasmonic acid (JA) and increased the plant's resistance to herbivorous insects. Here, we addressed the question of how tissue K affects the development of fungal pathogens and whether sensitivity of the pathogens to JA could play a role for the K–disease relationship in barley (Hordeum vulgare cv. Optic). We report that K‐deprived barley plants showed increased leaf concentrations of JA and other oxylipins. Furthermore, a natural tip‐to‐base K‐concentration gradient within leaves of K‐sufficient plants was quantitatively mirrored by the transcript levels of JA‐responsive genes. The local leaf tissue K concentrations affected the development of two economically important fungi in opposite ways, showing a positive correlation with powdery mildew (Blumeria graminis) and a negative correlation with leaf scald (Rhynchosporium commune) disease symptoms. B. graminis induced a JA response in the plant and was sensitive to methyl‐JA treatment whereas R. commune initiated no JA response and was JA insensitive. Our study challenges the view that high K generally improves plant health and suggests that JA sensitivity of pathogens could be an important factor in determining the exact K–disease relationship. Jasmonic acid (JA) is a plant hormone with important roles in leaf senescence and pathogen defence. Our finding that JA biosynthesis is up‐regulated by low concentrations of potassium (K) in leaves suggests that JA may provide the molecular link between plant K status and fungal disease. This hypothesis was further supported by the finding that disease symptoms on barley leaves were positively correlated with leaf K content for the JA‐sensitive powdery mildew (Blumeria graminis) but negatively correlated with leaf K content for the JA‐insensitive leaf scald (Rhynchosporium commune).
    Subject(s): Acids ; Airborne microorganisms ; Analysis ; Arabidopsis thaliana ; Ascomycota - metabolism ; Barley ; Biosynthesis ; Blumeria graminis ; Concentration gradient ; Cyclopentanes - metabolism ; Deprivation ; Disease control ; Fungi ; Gene Expression Regulation, Plant ; Hordeum - immunology ; Hordeum - metabolism ; Hordeum - microbiology ; Insects ; Jasmonic acid ; Leaves ; Nutrition ; Original ; Oxylipins - metabolism ; Pathogenic microorganisms ; Pathogens ; Plant Diseases - microbiology ; Plant Growth Regulators - metabolism ; Plant Leaves - metabolism ; Plant Leaves - microbiology ; Plant tissues ; Plants ; Polymerase Chain Reaction ; Potassium ; Potassium - metabolism ; Powdery mildew ; Rhynchosporium commune ; Scald ; Sensitivity ; Transcription
    ISSN: 0140-7791
    E-ISSN: 1365-3040
    Source: Elektronische Zeitschriftenbibliothek - Frei zugängliche E-Journals
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 9
    Language: English
    In: The Plant cell, 2014-08, Vol.26 (8), p.3286-3298
    Description: The Euphorbiaceae produce a diverse range of diterpenoids, many of which have pharmacological activities. These diterpenoids include ingenol mebutate, which is licensed for the treatment of a precancerous skin condition (actinic keratosis), and phorbol derivatives such as resiniferatoxin and prostratin, which are undergoing investigation for the treatment of severe pain and HIV, respectively. Despite the interest in these diterpenoids, their biosynthesis is poorly understood at present, with the only characterized step being the conversion of geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate into casbene. Here, we report a physical cluster of diterpenoid biosynthetic genes from castor (Ricinus communis), including casbene synthases and cytochrome P450s from the CYP726A subfamily. CYP726A14, CYP726A17, and CYP726A18 were able to catalyze 5-oxidation of casbene, a conserved oxidation step in the biosynthesis of this family of medicinally important diterpenoids. CYP726A16 catalyzed 7,8-epoxidation of 5-keto-casbene and CYP726A15 catalyzed 5-oxidation of neocembrene. Evidence of similar gene clustering was also found in two other Euphorbiaceae, including Euphorbia peplus, the source organism of ingenol mebutate. These results demonstrate conservation of gene clusters at the higher taxonomic level of the plant family and that this phenomenon could prove useful in further elucidating diterpenoid biosynthetic pathways.
    Subject(s): Analysis ; Biosynthetic Pathways ; Conserved Sequence ; Cytochrome P-450 Enzyme System - chemistry ; Cytochrome P-450 Enzyme System - genetics ; Cytochrome P-450 Enzyme System - metabolism ; Diterpenes - chemistry ; Diterpenes - metabolism ; Euphorbiaceae ; Euphorbiaceae - genetics ; Euphorbiaceae - metabolism ; Evolution, Molecular ; Genes, Plant ; Genetic aspects ; Genetic research ; Molecular Sequence Data ; Multigene Family ; Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, Biomolecular ; Phosphates ; Phosphorus-Oxygen Lyases - chemistry ; Phosphorus-Oxygen Lyases - genetics ; Phosphorus-Oxygen Lyases - metabolism ; Phylogeny ; Physiological aspects ; Ricinus - genetics ; Ricinus - metabolism ; s
    ISSN: 1040-4651
    E-ISSN: 1532-298X
    Source: JSTOR Life Sciences
    Source: JSTOR Ecology & Botany II
    Source: Elektronische Zeitschriftenbibliothek - Frei zugängliche E-Journals
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 10
    Language: English
    In: Plant physiology (Bethesda), 2012-09-01, Vol.160 (1), p.215-225
    Description: Triacylglycerol (TAG) levels and oil bodies persist in sucrose (Suc)-rescued Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) seedlings disrupted in seed oil catabolism. This study set out to establish if TAG levels persist as a metabolically inert pool when downstream catabolism is disrupted, or if other mechanisms, such as fatty acid (FA) recycling into TAG are operating. We show that TAG composition changes significantly in Suc-rescued seedlings compared with that found in dry seeds, with 18:2 and 18:3 accumulating. However, 20:1 FA is not efficiently recycled back into TAG in young seedlings, instead partitioning into the membrane lipid fraction and diacylglycerol. In the lipolysis mutant sugar dependent1 and the β-oxidation double mutant acx1acx2 (for acyl-Coenzyme A oxidase), levels of TAG actually increased in seedlings growing on Suc. We performed a transcriptomic study and identified up-regulation of an acyltransferase gene, DIACYLGLYCEROL ACYLTRANSFERASE3 (DGAT3), with homology to a peanut (Arachis hypogaea) cytosolic acyltransferase. The acyl-Coenzyme A substrate for this acyltransferase accumulates in mutants that are blocked in oil breakdown postlipolysis. Transient expression in Nicotiana benthamiana confirmed involvement in TAG synthesis and specificity toward 18:3 and 18:2 FAs. Double-mutant analysis with the peroxisomal ATP-binding cassette transporter mutant peroxisomal ABC transporter1 indicated involvement of DGAT3 in the partitioning of 18:3 into TAG in mutant seedlings growing on Suc. Fusion of the DGAT3 protein with green fluorescent protein confirmed localization to the cytosol of N. benthamiana. This work has demonstrated active recycling of 18:2 and 18:3 FAs into TAG when seed oil breakdown is blocked in a process involving a soluble cytosolic acyltransferase.
    Subject(s): Agrobacterium tumefaciens - genetics ; Agrobacterium tumefaciens - metabolism ; Amino Acid Sequence ; Arabidopsis - enzymology ; Arabidopsis - genetics ; Arabidopsis Proteins - genetics ; Arabidopsis Proteins - metabolism ; Arachis - enzymology ; Arachis - genetics ; BIOCHEMICAL PROCESSES AND MACROMOLECULAR STRUCTURES ; Biological and medical sciences ; Biosynthesis ; Cytosol - enzymology ; Diacylglycerol O-Acyltransferase - genetics ; Diacylglycerol O-Acyltransferase - metabolism ; Diglycerides ; Fatty acids ; Fatty Acids - metabolism ; Fundamental and applied biological sciences. Psychology ; Gene Expression Profiling - methods ; Gene Expression Regulation, Plant ; Genes ; Genes, Plant ; Germination ; Lipid bodies ; Lipid Metabolism ; Lipids ; Observations ; Peroxisomes ; Peroxisomes - enzymology ; Plant lipids ; Plant Oils - metabolism ; Plant physiology and development ; Plants ; Seedlings ; Seedlings - metabolism ; Seeds ; Seeds - genetics ; Seeds - metabolism ; Sequence Homology, Amino Acid ; Sucrose - metabolism ; Tobacco - genetics ; Tobacco - metabolism ; Triglycerides ; Triglycerides - biosynthesis
    ISSN: 0032-0889
    E-ISSN: 1532-2548
    Source: American Society of Plant Biologists
    Source: JSTOR Life Sciences
    Source: JSTOR Ecology & Botany II
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. More information can be found here...