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  • 1
    Article
    Article
    2020
    ISSN: 1057-9230 
    Language: English
    In: Health economics, 2020-10, Vol.29 (10), p.1316-1323
    Description: The Journal of Health Economics and Health Economics are arguably the top two journals in the field of health economics. Together, they published 1,679 empirical research articles in the past decade (2010–2019). In line with analyses based on earlier periods, the empirical evidence in top health economics journals continues to be dominated by the United States (37% of all empirical articles), whereas studies based on low‐income countries remain rare (2%). Countries with higher disease burdens receive generally less attention from health economists publishing at the top of their field. Reflecting this, more research was published based on data from the Nordic countries (27 million people) than from sub‐Saharan Africa and South Asia regions combined (2.9 billion people). Finally, one‐third of the empirical articles did not indicate the country of evidence in the title or the , possibly to signal external validity of the findings. This practice was particularly common for articles based on data from North America with more than half of the articles omitting the country of evidence from the title and the . The study concludes by exploring some hypotheses that may explain these findings.
    Subject(s): bibliometrics ; external validity ; health and inequality ; health economics
    ISSN: 1057-9230
    E-ISSN: 1099-1050
    Source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
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  • 2
    Language: English
    In: American journal of agricultural economics, 2016-07, Vol.98 (4), p.1230-1249
    Description: Large rural‐urban wage gaps observed in many developing countries are suggestive of barriers to migration that keep potential migrants in rural areas. Using long panel data spanning nearly two decades, I study the extent to which migration rates are constrained by liquidity constraints in rural Tanzania. The analysis begins by quantifying the impact of weather variation on household welfare. The results show how household consumption co‐moves with temperature, rendering households vulnerable to local weather events. These temperature‐induced income shocks are then found to inhibit long‐term migration among men, thus preventing them from tapping into the opportunities brought about by geographical mobility.
    Subject(s): Africa ; Analysis ; Constraints ; Consumption ; Developing countries--LDCs ; duration models ; Geographical mobility ; growing degree days ; Households ; Internal migration ; Liquidity ; Liquidity constraints ; Migrants ; Migration ; Mobility ; Panel data ; Rural areas ; Rural communities ; Social service ; Temperature ; Weather ; Welfare
    ISSN: 0002-9092
    E-ISSN: 1467-8276
    Source: International Bibliography of the Social Sciences (IBSS)
    Source: Business Source Ultimate
    Source: EconLit with Full Text
    Source: Oxford Journals 2016 Current and Archive A-Z Collection
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  • 3
    Language: English
    In: Agricultural economics, 2017-07, Vol.48 (4), p.469-480
    Description: We study the relationship between pre‐school children's food consumption and household agricultural production. Using a large household survey from rural Ethiopia, we find that increasing household production diversity leads to considerable improvements in children's dietary diversity. However, we also document how this nonseparability of consumption and production does not hold for households that have access to food markets. These findings imply that nutrition‐sensitive agricultural interventions that push for market integration are likely to be more effective in reducing under‐nutrition than those promoting production diversity.
    Subject(s): Agricultural household models ; Agricultural industry ; Agriculture ; Analysis ; Child dietary diversity ; Children ; Count data ; D12 ; Elementary school students ; Food and nutrition ; Food markets ; O12 ; Q12 ; Q18 ; Supermarkets
    ISSN: 0169-5150
    E-ISSN: 1574-0862
    Source: EconLit with Full Text
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  • 4
    Article
    Article
    2018
    ISSN: 0002-9092 
    Language: English
    In: American journal of agricultural economics, 2018-10-01, Vol.100 (5), p.1302-1319
    Description: Abstract Stunting affects 160 million pre-school children globally with adverse life-long consequences. While work within nutritional science suggests that stunting in early childhood is associated with low intakes of animal-sourced foods (ASFs), this topic has received little attention from economists. We attempt to redress this omission through an analysis of 130,432 children aged 6–23 months from 49 countries. We document distinctive patterns of ASF consumption among children in different regions. We find evidence of strong associations between stunting and a generic ASF consumption indicator, as well as dairy, meat/fish, and egg consumption indicators, and evidence that consuming multiple ASFs is more advantageous than any single ASF. We explore why ASF consumption is low but also so variable across countries. Non-tradable ASFs (fresh milk, eggs) are a very expensive source of calories in low-income countries and caloric prices of these foods are strongly associated with children’s consumption patterns. Other demand-side factors are also important, but the strong influence of prices implies an important role for agricultural policies—in production, marketing and trade—to improve the accessibility and affordability of ASFs in poorer countries.
    Subject(s): Access ; Affordability ; Agricultural policy ; Animal-based foods ; Animals ; Animal‐sourced foods ; Calories ; Childhood ; Children ; Consumption ; dietary diversity ; Eggs ; Fish ; fisheries ; Food ; Food sources ; livestock ; Low income countries ; Marketing ; Meat ; Milk ; nutrition ; Prices ; Pricing ; stunting
    ISSN: 0002-9092
    E-ISSN: 1467-8276
    Source: International Bibliography of the Social Sciences (IBSS)
    Source: Business Source Ultimate
    Source: EconLit with Full Text
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  • 5
    Language: English
    In: The Journal of development studies, 2017-09-02, Vol.53 (9), p.1414-1429
    Description: Seasonality in agricultural production continues to shape intra-annual food availability in low-income countries. Using high-frequency panel data from northern Ethiopia, this study attempts to quantify seasonal fluctuations in children's weights. Consistent with earlier studies, we document considerable seasonality in children's age and height adjusted weights. While children located closer to local food markets are better nourished compared to their counterparts residing farther away, their weights are also subject to considerable seasonality. Further analysis shows that children located closer to food markets consume more diverse diets than those located farther away but the content of the diet varies across seasons. This leads us to conclude that households located near these food markets are not able to insulate their children from seasonal weight fluctuations. We discuss some policy options with potential to address this threat to child wellbeing.
    Subject(s): Agricultural development ; Agricultural production ; Child development ; Children ; Children & youth ; Developing countries--LDCs ; Diet ; Food ; Households ; Human growth ; Low income countries ; Low income groups ; Markets ; Panel data ; Seasonal variations ; Threats ; Well being
    ISSN: 0022-0388
    E-ISSN: 1743-9140
    Source: International Bibliography of the Social Sciences (IBSS)
    Source: Business Source Ultimate
    Source: EconLit with Full Text
    Source: Academic Search Ultimate
    Source: Sociological Abstracts
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  • 6
    Language: English
    In: Public health nutrition, 2016-07, Vol.19 (10), p.1723-1730
    Description: To revisit seasonality by assessing how household diets vary across agricultural seasons in rural and urban Ethiopia. The role of seasonality on the sources and intake of energy (per capita) and household dietary diversity score (HDDS) was analysed. The use of nationally representative household-level data collected each month over one year to study the seasonal changes in the sources and intake of energy and HDDS. Eleven regions of Ethiopia, including rural and urban settings. Total of 27 835 households were interviewed between July 2010 and July 2011 in all eleven regions of the country. On average each month saw 2300 household interviews, yielding nationally representative data for each calendar month. For rural households, the mean daily per capita energy intake was 10 288 kJ (2459 kcal) in February (post-harvest period) and lower in the lean season: 9703 kJ (2319 kcal) in June (P〈0·05) and 9552 kJ (2283 kcal) in July (P〈0·001). HDDS for rural households was highest in February (6·73) and lowest in June (5·98; P〈0·001) but high again in July (6·57). Urban energy intake was also lower in the lean season but HDDS varied less by season. Considerable seasonal variation was also found in energy sources in rural areas, less so in urban areas. Household diets in Ethiopia remain subjected to significant seasonal stress. HDDS and food security measured using energy intake do not always agree. Preferably, HDDS and energy intake data should be used together to assess food security.
    Subject(s): Diet ; Energy Intake ; Ethiopia ; Family Characteristics ; Food Supply ; Humans ; Monitoring and surveillance ; Research Papers ; Rural Population ; Seasons ; Urban Population
    ISSN: 1368-9800
    E-ISSN: 1475-2727
    Source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
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  • 7
    Language: English
    In: American journal of agricultural economics, 2019-10-01, Vol.101 (5), p.1311-1327
    Description: Abstract Child dietary diversity is poor in much of rural Africa and developing Asia, prompting significant efforts to leverage agriculture to improve diets. However, growing recognition that even very poor rural households rely on markets to satisfy their demand for nutrient-rich non-staple foods warrants a much better understanding of how rural markets vary in their diversity, competitiveness, frequency and food affordability, and how such characteristics are associated with diets. This article addresses these questions using data from rural Ethiopia. Deploying a novel market survey in conjunction with an information-rich household survey, we find that children in proximity to markets that sell more non-staple food groups have more diverse diets. However, the association is small in absolute terms; moving from three non-staple food groups in the market to six is associated with an increase in the number of non-staple food groups consumed by ∼0.27 and the likelihood of consumption of any non-staple food group by 10 percentage points. These associations are similar in magnitude to those describing the relationship between dietary diversity and household production diversity; moreover, for some food groups, notably dairy, we find that household and community production of that food is especially important. These modest associations may reflect several specific features of our sample which is situated in very poor, food-insecure localities where even the relatively better off are poor in absolute terms and where, by international standards, relative prices for non-staple foods are very high.
    Subject(s): Affordability ; Associations ; child nutrition ; Children ; Competitiveness ; Dairy products ; Diet ; diet diversity ; Ethiopia ; Food ; Food consumption ; Food groups ; Food market diversity ; Food production ; Households ; International standardization ; International standards ; Market research ; Markets ; Nutrition ; Polls & surveys ; Prices ; Proximity ; Rural areas ; Surveys
    ISSN: 0002-9092
    E-ISSN: 1467-8276
    Source: International Bibliography of the Social Sciences (IBSS)
    Source: Business Source Ultimate
    Source: EconLit with Full Text
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  • 8
    Language: English
    In: The Lancet global health, 2020-01, Vol.8 (1), p.e59-e66
    Description: The EAT–Lancet Commission drew on all available nutritional and environmental evidence to construct the first global benchmark diet capable of sustaining health and protecting the planet, but it did not assess dietary affordability. We used food price and household income data to estimate affordability of EAT–Lancet benchmark diets, as a first step to guiding interventions to improve diets around the world. We obtained retail prices from 2011 for 744 foods in 159 countries, collected under the International Comparison Program. We used these data to identify the most affordable foods to meet EAT–Lancet targets. We compared total diet cost per day to each country's mean per capita household income, calculated the proportion of people for whom the most affordable EAT–Lancet diet exceeds total income, and also measured affordability relative to a least-cost diet that meets essential nutrient requirements. The most affordable EAT–Lancet diets cost a global median of US$2·84 per day (IQR 2·41–3·16) in 2011, of which the largest share was the cost of fruits and vegetables (31·2%), followed by legumes and nuts (18·7%), meat, eggs, and fish (15·2%), and dairy (13·2%). This diet costs a small fraction of average incomes in high-income countries but is not affordable for the world's poor. We estimated that the cost of an EAT–Lancet diet exceeded household per capita income for at least 1·58 billion people. The EAT–Lancet diet is also more expensive than the minimum cost of nutrient adequacy, on average, by a mean factor of 1·60 (IQR 1·41–1·78). Current diets differ greatly from EAT–Lancet targets. Improving diets is affordable in many countries but for many people would require some combination of higher income, nutritional assistance, and lower prices. Data and analysis for the cost of healthier foods are needed to inform both local interventions and systemic changes. Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.
    Subject(s): Costs and Cost Analysis - statistics & numerical data ; Diet - economics ; Diet - standards ; Food Supply - economics ; Humans ; Nutrition Policy - economics
    ISSN: 2214-109X
    E-ISSN: 2214-109X
    Source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
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  • 9
    Language: English
    In: The Journal of development studies, 2019-06-03, Vol.55 (6), p.1267-1284
    Description: One of the central questions in food policy debates has been the role of cash cropping for achieving food security in low-income countries. We revisit this question in the context of smallholder coffee production in Ethiopia. Using data collected by the authors on about 1600 coffee farmers in the country, we find that coffee income is associated with improved food security, even after controlling for total income and other factors. Further analysis suggests that one possible pathway is linked to being better able to smooth consumption across agricultural seasons.
    Subject(s): Agricultural production ; Business & Economics ; Cash crops ; Coffee ; Coffee industry ; Consumption ; Crops ; Developing countries--LDCs ; Development Studies ; Economics ; Farmers ; Food security ; Low income countries ; Low income groups ; Social Sciences
    ISSN: 0022-0388
    E-ISSN: 1743-9140
    Source: International Bibliography of the Social Sciences (IBSS)
    Source: Business Source Ultimate
    Source: EconLit with Full Text
    Source: Academic Search Ultimate
    Source: Web of Science - Social Sciences Citation Index – 2019〈img src="http://exlibris-pub.s3.amazonaws.com/fromwos-v2.jpg" /〉
    Source: Sociological Abstracts
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  • 10
    Language: English
    In: Maternal and child health journal, 2020-08, Vol.24 (8), p.1028-1037
    Description: This study assessed the completeness of child health records maintained and collected within community health information system in Ethiopia. A household listing was carried out in 221 enumeration areas in food insecure areas of Ethiopia to determine the presence of a child less than 24-months. This list of children was then compared against the information stored at the local health posts. A household survey was administered to a sample of 2155 households that had a child less than 24-months of age to assess determinants and consequences of exclusion from the health post registers. Out of the 10,318 children identified during the listing, 36% were found from the health post records. Further analysis based on the household survey data indicated that health posts that had adopted nationally recommended recordkeeping practices had more complete records (p 〈 0.01) and that children residing farther from health posts were less likely to be found from the registers (p 〈 0.05). Mothers whose child was found from the registers were more likely to know a health extension worker (p 〈 0.01), had a contact with one (p 〈 0.01), and their child was more likely to have received growth monitoring (p 〈 0.05). The incompleteness of the data collected at the health posts poses a challenge for effective implementation of the national health extension program and various complementary programs in Ethiopia.
    Subject(s): Child ; Child, Preschool ; Children ; Children & youth ; Childrens health ; Community health information systems ; Community health services ; Community Networks - standards ; Community Networks - statistics & numerical data ; Consumer health information ; Electronic health records ; Ethiopia ; Ethiopia - epidemiology ; Female ; Food Insecurity ; Food supply ; Health aspects ; Health Records, Personal ; Humans ; Infant ; Information management ; Information systems ; Information Systems - standards ; Information Systems - statistics & numerical data ; Male ; Malnutrition - diagnosis ; Malnutrition - epidemiology ; Mountain life ; Records and correspondence ; Regression Analysis
    ISSN: 1092-7875
    E-ISSN: 1573-6628
    Source: Academic Search Ultimate
    Source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
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