placeholder
and
and

Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Proceed order?

Export
  • 1
    Language: English
    In: Higher education quarterly, 2021-03-09
    ISSN: 0951-5224
    E-ISSN: 1468-2273
    Source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    Language: English
    In: Journal of international students, 2020-11-01, Vol.10 (S2), p.86-100
    Description: This article explores reflection and reflective thinking, drawing upon qualitative research on international students' perceptions of developing their employability while studying in the UK. It addresses a gap in the literature by making a connection between internationalization and employability, concepts that are mainly framed as separate discursive realms. The literature on internationalization is focused around international student recruitment and the benefits to the host institution; the employability discourse is oriented towards national policies on the development of human capital through home students in the domestic market. The reflective thinking demonstrated by the international students illustrates the challenges they faced in seeking opportunities to enhance their employability within and outside the university; and to (re)assess learning opportunities that are integrated with work experience. The findings suggest that there is scope for embedding employment development opportunities (EDOs) at a systemic level in order to enhance the experience of international students.
    Subject(s): Students, Foreign ; Research ; Employability ; Globalization ; Dewey, John
    ISSN: 2162-3104
    E-ISSN: 2166-3750
    Source: Directory of Open Access Journals
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 3
    Language: English
    In: Acta Universitatis Carolinae. Kinanthropologica, 2016, Vol.52 (2), p.56-74
    Description: Much evidence to link youth expeditions and gap years with a range of outcome benefits for participants exists, but to date, there have been relatively few insights into what exactly brings about these reported outcomes. A modified version of the Sail Training Voyage Toolkit (2011) was used to evaluate outcomes of a five-week British Exploring Society youth expedition in the Himalayas. Data generated from 22 participants completing the modified Sail Training Voyage Feedback Form at the end of their expedition were complemented by data from 16 interviews conducted during weeks one, three and five of the expedition. Key factors identified by the participants which had influenced their learning were: (1) Other Young Explorers, (2) being involved in making decisions and having choices, (3) having time to learn at their own pace; time to get comfortable with people; being able to talk with other people (to make connections); (4) group leaders, and (5) wild camping. Data from 16 interviews supported these outcomes, while the physical challenges (of climbing peaks) and cultural interaction with local people were highly valued aspects of the expedition. Participants were more aware of risks and more confident about safety issues and taking risks after the expedition. These important outcomes may be transferred to future expeditions, higher education or employment. Personal development and training organisations should consider these findings. (Autor).
    Subject(s): Evaluation ; Lernbedingungen ; Trekking ; Fragebogen ; Jugendarbeit ; Bewertung ; Sportpädagogik ; Selbstständigkeit ; Bergsteigen ; Persönlichkeitsentwicklung ; Hochgebirgstour ; Jugendlicher ; Lernerfolg ; Umwelteinfluss ; Abenteuer ; Lerninhalt ; Soziales Lernen ; Expedition ; Erlebnispädagogik ; Fallstudie ; Befragung ; expedition ; Sail Training Toolkit ; British Exploring ; Himalayas ; youth
    ISSN: 2336-6052
    ISSN: 1212-1428
    ISSN: 0323-0511
    E-ISSN: 2336-6052
    Source: Directory of Open Access Journals
    Source: SPORTDiscus with Full Text
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 4
    Language: English
    Description: Student mobility is the most visible aspect of the internationalisation of higher education. Congruent with global trends, Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA) data shows that for over a decade, international students have been the largest group of students studying for a full-time Masters degree in the UK (70% in 2015/16). Large-scale surveys suggest that developing employability is one of the main motivations for studying abroad. However, internationalisation and employability are largely regarded as unrelated in higher education policies and discourses. As a result, the literature on internationalisation is mainly framed around the recruitment of international students and associated economic benefits to host countries and institutions, whereas employability related discourses are predominantly oriented towards national policies focused on the development of human capital through domestic students. Consequently, there is a dearth of research exploring international student employability. This thesis aims to contribute to understanding the connections between internationalisation and employability. The research examined Masters-level students’ rationales for studying abroad and how these relate to their perceptions of developing their employability. The research was qualitative and involved conducting 36 semi-structured interviews at two points in time (at the end of the first and second semesters) with a targeted sample of 19 international Master students from 11 non-EU countries who were studying on four different programmes (located in four Schools) at a Scottish university: Social and Political Science; Literatures, Languages and Cultures; Education; and Business. The findings of the research are discussed using the international student lifecycle (ISL) model which adopts a holistic approach towards understanding students’ rationales for studying abroad. The focus lies in the relatedness of their lived experience and expected outcomes including their employability. The thematic analysis of the interview data resulted in a proposed conceptual framework which identified different rationales or motivations international students have for studying abroad: educational rationale (studying abroad for a quality education); experiential rationale (seeking to experience living and studying in a different and multicultural environment); aspirational rationale (aspiring to contribute to society during their study and in their home country); and the economic rationale (aiming to develop skills and competencies in preparation for work in a globally interconnected world). In line with the focus of the study, the economic rationale was explored in greater depth to understand students’ perceptions of employability-related support available at the programme level and within the wider university (Careers Service). The findings showed variations in the support provided across the four schools. There was a degree of unanimity regarding the student perceptions of the support made available by the Careers Service. Both levels of support influenced students’ perceptions of developing their employability during their Masters studies. Further analysis of the findings led to the development of four employability-related constructs including the knowledge, skills, attitudes and relationships the students perceived they developed during their study abroad. The employability-related constructs framework that emanated from the research aligns with and extends frameworks which have originated from recent large-scale studies that have linked studying abroad to developing employability. The findings have important implications for policy development and educational practices. The policy implications relate to the relevance of the framework proposed for institutions to take account of students’ rationales in the development of internationalisation strategies. In terms of educational practices, the proposed employability-related constructs framework can be integrated into the institutional curriculum and extra-curricular activities to enhance the student experience.
    Subject(s): international student lifecycle ; postgraduate student experience ; employability ; internationalisation
    Source: University of Edinburgh dspace
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 5
    Language: English
    Description: Student mobility is the most visible aspect of the internationalisation of higher education. Congruent with global trends, Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA) data shows that for over a decade, international students have been the largest group of students studying for a full-time Masters degree in the UK (70% in 2015/16). Large-scale surveys suggest that developing employability is one of the main motivations for studying abroad. However, internationalisation and employability are largely regarded as unrelated in higher education policies and discourses. As a result, the literature on internationalisation is mainly framed around the recruitment of international students and associated economic benefits to host countries and institutions, whereas employability related discourses are predominantly oriented towards national policies focused on the development of human capital through domestic students. Consequently, there is a dearth of research exploring international student employability. This thesis aims to contribute to understanding the connections between internationalisation and employability. The research examined Masters-level students' rationales for studying abroad and how these relate to their perceptions of developing their employability. The research was qualitative and involved conducting 36 semi-structured interviews at two points in time (at the end of the first and second semesters) with a targeted sample of 19 international Master students from 11 non-EU countries who were studying on four different programmes (located in four Schools) at a Scottish university: Social and Political Science; Literatures, Languages and Cultures; Education; and Business. The findings of the research are discussed using the international student lifecycle (ISL) model which adopts a holistic approach towards understanding students' rationales for studying abroad. The focus lies in the relatedness of their lived experience and expected outcomes including their employability. The thematic analysis of the interview data resulted in a proposed conceptual framework which identified different rationales or motivations international students have for studying abroad: educational rationale (studying abroad for a quality education); experiential rationale (seeking to experience living and studying in a different and multicultural environment); aspirational rationale (aspiring to contribute to society during their study and in their home country); and the economic rationale (aiming to develop skills and competencies in preparation for work in a globally interconnected world). In line with the focus of the study, the economic rationale was explored in greater depth to understand students' perceptions of employability-related support available at the programme level and within the wider university (Careers Service). The findings showed variations in the support provided across the four schools. There was a degree of unanimity regarding the student perceptions of the support made available by the Careers Service. Both levels of support influenced students' perceptions of developing their employability during their Masters studies. Further analysis of the findings led to the development of four employability-related constructs including the knowledge, skills, attitudes and relationships the students perceived they developed during their study abroad. The employability-related constructs framework that emanated from the research aligns with and extends frameworks which have originated from recent large-scale studies that have linked studying abroad to developing employability. The findings have important implications for policy development and educational practices. The policy implications relate to the relevance of the framework proposed for institutions to take account of students' rationales in the development of internationalisation strategies. In terms of educational practices, the proposed employability-related constructs framework can be integrated into the institutional curriculum and extra-curricular activities to enhance the student experience.
    Source: ProQuest Dissertations & Theses Global
    Source: © ProQuest LLC All rights reserved〈img src="https://exlibris-pub.s3.amazonaws.com/PQ_Logo.jpg" style="vertical-align:middle;margin-left:7px"〉
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. More information can be found here...