placeholder
and
and

Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Proceed order?

Export
Filter
Language
Year
  • 1
    Language: English
    In: Memory & cognition, 2017-08, Vol.45 (6), p.1045-1061
    Description: While the cognitive and neural bases of episodic future thinking are well documented, questions remain as to what gives the sense that an imagined event belongs to one’s personal future. Capitalizing on previous research on metacognitive appraisals in autobiographical remembering, we propose that episodic future thinking involves, in varying degrees, a subjective belief in the potential occurrence of imagined future events and we explore the nature and determinants of such belief. To this aim, participants provided justifications for belief in occurrence for a series of past and future events. For each event, they also assessed their subjective feelings (belief in occurrence, autonoetic experience, and belief in accuracy) and rated various characteristics of mental representations that might contribute to these feelings. Results showed that belief in the occurrence of future events mostly related to their integration in a broader autobiographical context, especially their relevance to personal goals and their personal plausibility. We also found that belief in occurrence, autonoetic experience, and belief in accuracy represented distinct subjective appraisals of future events, which depended in part on different determinants. Based on these findings, we propose a new theoretical model of subjective feelings associated with episodic future thinking that conceives of belief in occurrence as arising from metacognitive appraisals that shape the sense that imagined events belong to one’s personal future.
    Subject(s): Belief in occurrence ; Future thinking ; Psychology ; Autobiographical memory ; Metacognition ; Cognitive Psychology ; Autonoetic experience ; Young Adult ; Humans ; Memory, Episodic ; Adult ; Female ; Male ; Metacognition - physiology ; Imagination - physiology ; Thinking - physiology ; Index Medicus
    ISSN: 0090-502X
    E-ISSN: 1532-5946
    Source: Business Source Ultimate
    Source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    Language: English
    In: Quarterly journal of experimental psychology (2006), 2019-11, Vol.72 (11), p.2658-2671
    Description: Recent studies suggest that different forms of episodic simulation—mental representations of past, future, or atemporal events—recruit many of the same underlying cognitive and neural processes. This leads to the question whether there are distinctive hallmark characteristics of episodic future thinking: the subjective sense that imagined events belong to and will occur in the personal future. In this study, we aimed at shedding light on the cognitive ingredients that contribute to this sense of future occurrence by asking participants to imagine personal and experimenter-provided future events associated with high or low degrees of belief in future occurrence and then to reflect on the bases for their beliefs. Results showed that contextualising autobiographical knowledge (i.e., articulating links between items of information associated with imagined future events, goals, and personal characteristics) is a critical aspect of belief in future occurrence, and autobiographical knowledge can be flexibly used to either support or suppress belief in future occurrence. These findings indicate that episodic future thought not only depends on simulation processes (i.e., the construction of detailed mental representations for future events) but also requires that imagined events are meaningfully integrated within an autobiographical context.
    Subject(s): Mental Processes ; Mental Recall ; Imagination ; Humans ; Metacognition ; Thinking ; Memory, Episodic ; Adult ; Female ; Male ; Forecasting ; Culture ; Index Medicus
    ISSN: 1747-0218
    E-ISSN: 1747-0226
    Source: SAGE Complete A-Z List
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 3
    Language: English
    In: Clinical infectious diseases, 2014-11-01, Vol.59 (suppl_4), p.S325-S330
    Description: The Haydom, Tanzania, site (TZH) of The Etiology, Risk Factors and Interactions of Enteric Infections and Malnutrition and the Consequences for Child Health and Development (MAL-ED) Study is in north-central Tanzania, 300 km from the nearest urban center. TZH is in a remote rural district where most of the population are agropastoralists and grow maize as the staple food. The average household size is 7. The average woman achieves a parity of 6 and has 1 child death. Socioeconomic indicators are poor, with essentially no household having access to electricity, piped water, or improved sanitary facilities (compared with 14%, 7%, and 12%, respectively, reported nationally). The Demographic Health Survey Tanzania 2004 indicated that the region had high rates of stunting and underweight (40% and 31% of children aged 〈5 years had a height-for-age z score and weight-for-age z score, respectively, of 〈–2) and an under-5 child mortality rate of 5.8%. Human immunodeficiency virus prevalence among 18-month-old children is 〈0.5%. TZH represents a remote rural African population with profound poverty and malnutrition, but a strong community-based research infrastructure.
    Subject(s): Women ; Socioeconomic status ; Demography ; Households ; Etiology ; Lutheranism ; Corn ; Malnutrition ; Child nutrition disorders ; Health surveys ; Epidemiologic Research Design ; Tanzania - epidemiology ; Humans ; Middle Aged ; Child, Preschool ; Infant ; Mothers - statistics & numerical data ; Socioeconomic Factors ; Young Adult ; Child Welfare ; Adolescent ; Adult ; Female ; Child Development ; Child ; Longitudinal Studies ; Infant, Newborn ; Index Medicus
    ISSN: 1058-4838
    E-ISSN: 1537-6591
    Source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
    Source: Oxford Journals 2016 Current and Archive A-Z Collection
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 4
    Language: English
    In: Neuropsychological rehabilitation, 2018-10-03, Vol.28 (7), p.1110-1130
    Description: While the efficacy of mental visual imagery (MVI) to alleviate autobiographical memory (AM) impairment in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients has been documented, nothing is known about the brain changes sustaining that improvement. To explore this issue, 20 relapsing-remitting MS patients showing AM impairment were randomly assigned to two groups, experimental (n = 10), who underwent the MVI programme, and control (n = 10), who followed a sham verbal programme. Besides the stringent AM assessment, the patients underwent structural and functional MRI sessions, consisting in retrieving personal memories, within a pre-/post-facilitation study design. Only the experimental group showed a significant AM improvement in post-facilitation, accompanied by changes in brain activation (medial and lateral frontal regions), functional connectivity (posterior brain regions), and grey matter volume (parahippocampal gyrus). Minor activations and functional connectivity changes were observed in the control group. The MVI programme improved AM in MS patients leading to functional and structural changes reflecting (1) an increase reliance on brain regions sustaining a self-referential process; (2) a decrease of those reflecting an effortful research process; and (3) better use of neural resources in brain regions sustaining MVI. Functional changes reported in the control group likely reflected ineffective attempts to use the sham strategy in AM.
    Subject(s): voxel-based morphometry ; functional neuroimaging ; multiple sclerosis ; Autobiographical memory ; cognitive rehabilitation ; Disability Evaluation ; Humans ; Middle Aged ; Memory, Episodic ; Male ; Random Allocation ; Oxygen - blood ; Neuropsychological Tests ; Magnetic Resonance Imaging ; Memory Disorders - etiology ; Analysis of Variance ; Image Processing, Computer-Assisted ; Imagination ; Multiple Sclerosis, Relapsing-Remitting - diagnostic imaging ; Memory Disorders - rehabilitation ; Adult ; Female ; Goals ; Photic Stimulation ; Multiple Sclerosis, Relapsing-Remitting - complications ; Index Medicus
    ISSN: 0960-2011
    E-ISSN: 1464-0694
    Source: Academic Search Ultimate
    Source: MLA International Bibliography with Full Text
    Source: SPORTDiscus with Full Text
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 5
    Language: English
    In: Frontiers in psychology, 2020, Vol.11, p.623910-623910
    Description: Our senses are constantly stimulated in our daily lives but we have only a limited understanding of how they affect our cognitive processes and, especially, our autobiographical memory. Capitalizing on a public science event, we conducted the first empirical study that aimed to compare the relative influence of the five senses on the access, temporal distribution, and phenomenological characteristics of autobiographical memories in a sample of about 400 participants. We found that the access and the phenomenological features of memories varied as a function of the type of sensory cues, but not their temporal distribution. With regard to their influence on autobiographical memory, an overlap between some senses was found, with on one hand, olfaction and taste and, on the other, vision, audition, and touch. We discuss these findings in the light of theories of perception, memory, and the self, and consider methodological implications of the sensory cuing technique in memory research, as well as clinical implications for research in psychopathological and neuropsychological populations.
    Subject(s): cuing techniques ; self ; olfaction ; autobiographical memory ; psychopathology ; reminiscence bump
    ISSN: 1664-1078
    E-ISSN: 1664-1078
    Source: PubMed Central
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 6
    Language: English
    In: Health services research, 2018-04, Vol.53 (2), p.879-895
    Description: Objective To assess whether a combination of Internet‐based and postal survey methods (mixed‐mode) compared to postal‐only survey methods (postal‐only) leads to improved response rates in a physician survey, and to compare the cost implications of the different recruitment strategies. Data Sources/Study Setting All primary care gynecologists in Bremen and Lower Saxony, Germany, were invited to participate in a cross‐sectional survey from January to July 2014. Study Design The sample was divided into two strata (A; B) depending on availability of an email address. Within each stratum, potential participants were randomly assigned to mixed‐mode or postal‐only group. Principal Findings In Stratum A, the mixed‐mode group had a lower response rate compared to the postal‐only group (12.5 vs. 20.2 percent; RR = 0.61, 95 percent CI: 0.44–0.87). In stratum B, no significant differences were found (15.6 vs. 16.2 percent; RR = 0.95, 95 percent CI: 0.62–1.44). Total costs (in €) per valid questionnaire returned (Stratum A: 399.72 vs. 248.85; Stratum B: 496.37 vs. 455.15) and per percentage point of response (Stratum A: 1,379.02 vs. 861.02; Stratum B 1,116.82 vs. 1,024.09) were higher, whereas variable costs were lower in mixed‐mode compared to the respective postal‐only groups (Stratum A cost ratio: 0.47, Stratum B cost ratio: 0.71). Conclusions In this study, primary care gynecologists were more likely to participate by traditional postal‐only than by mixed‐mode survey methods that first offered an Internet option. However, the lower response rate for the mixed‐mode method may be partly due to the older age structure of the responding gynecologists. Variable costs per returned questionnaire were substantially lower in mixed‐mode groups and indicate the potential for cost savings if the sample population is sufficiently large.
    Subject(s): Physician survey ; mixed‐mode ; methods ; response rate ; cost implications ; Age Factors ; Cross-Sectional Studies ; Primary Health Care - statistics & numerical data ; Gynecology ; Humans ; Middle Aged ; Internet - statistics & numerical data ; Postal Service - statistics & numerical data ; Male ; Data Collection - methods ; Adult ; Female ; Surveys and Questionnaires ; Physicians - statistics & numerical data ; Germany ; Surveys ; Practice ; Gynecologists ; Index Medicus ; Innovative Methods in Health Services Research
    ISSN: 0017-9124
    E-ISSN: 1475-6773
    Source: Academic Search Ultimate
    Source: PubMed Central
    Source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 7
    Language: English
    In: International journal of environmental research and public health, 2016-02-26, Vol.13 (3), p.265
    Description: In industrialized countries atopic diseases have been reported to be less likely in children and adolescents with a migrant background compared to non-migrants. This paper aimed at both examining and comparing prevalence of asthma, allergic rhinoconjunctivitis and atopic dermatitis and allergic sensitization to specific IgE antibodies in children and adolescents with and without a migrant background. Using data of the population-based German Health Interview and Examination Survey for children and adolescents (KiGGS;n = 17,450; 0-17 years), lifetime and 12-month prevalence of atopic diseases and point prevalence of 20 common allergic sensitizations were investigated among migrants compared to non-migrants. Multiple regression models were used to estimate the association of atopic disease and allergic sensitization with migrant background. In multivariate analyses with substantial adjustment we found atopic dermatitis about one-third less often (OR 0.73, 0.57-0.93) in participants with a two-sided migrant background. Statistically significant associations between allergic sensitizations and a two-sided migrant background remained for birch (OR 0.73, 0.58-0.90), soybean (OR 0.72, 0.54-0.96), peanut (OR 0.69, 0.53-0.90), rice (OR 0.64, 0.48-0.87), potato (OR 0.64, 0.48-0.85), and horse dander (OR 0.58, 0.40-0.85). Environmental factors and living conditions might be responsible for the observed differences.
    Subject(s): Prevalence ; Cross-Sectional Studies ; Dermatitis, Atopic - epidemiology ; Humans ; Risk Factors ; Child, Preschool ; Infant ; Male ; Socioeconomic Factors ; Germany - epidemiology ; Adolescent ; Hypersensitivity, Immediate - epidemiology ; Female ; Transients and Migrants - statistics & numerical data ; Child ; Infant, Newborn ; Index Medicus ; allergies ; atopic hypersensitivity ; prevalence ; children ; adolescents ; transients and migrants
    ISSN: 1660-4601
    ISSN: 1661-7827
    E-ISSN: 1660-4601
    Source: PubMed Central
    Source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 8
    Article
    Article
    2014
    ISSN: 0301-0066 
    Language: English
    In: Perception, 2014-12, Vol.43 (12), p.1404-1406
    ISSN: 0301-0066
    E-ISSN: 1468-4233
    Source: SAGE Complete A-Z List
    Source: Academic Search Ultimate
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 9
    Language: English
    In: BioMed research international, 2017-04-04, Vol.2017, p.1746146-10
    Description: Objective. To identify care-related and maternal risk factors for the antenatal nondetection of IUGR. Methods. In this hospital-based case-control study we compared antenatally undetected IUGR neonates (cases) to detected IUGR neonates (controls). Data were collected using newborn documentation sheets and standardized personal interviews with the mothers. We calculated antenatal detection rates and used uni- and multivariable logistic regression models to assess the association of antenatal nondetection of IUGR and maternal and care-related factors. Results. A total of 161 neonates from three hospitals were included in the study. Suboptimal fetal growth was identified antenatally in n=77 pregnancies while in n=84 it was not detected antenatally (antenatal detection rate: 47.8%). Severity of IUGR, maternal complications, and a Doppler examination during the course of pregnancy were associated with IUGR detection. We did not find statistically significant differences regarding parental socioeconomic status and maternal migration background. Conclusions. In our study, about half of all pregnancies affected by suboptimal growth remained undetected. Future in-depth studies with larger study populations should further examine factors that could increase antenatal detection rates for IUGR.
    Subject(s): Humans ; Prenatal Diagnosis ; Risk Factors ; Fetal Growth Retardation - epidemiology ; Mothers ; Case-Control Studies ; Fetal Growth Retardation - pathology ; Pregnancy ; Ultrasonography, Prenatal ; Adult ; Female ; Fetal Growth Retardation - diagnosis ; Infant, Newborn ; Infants (Newborn) ; Case studies ; Risk factors (Health) ; Fetus ; Diagnosis ; Comparative analysis ; Health aspects ; Growth retardation ; Growth ; Index Medicus
    ISSN: 2314-6133
    E-ISSN: 2314-6141
    Source: Academic Search Ultimate
    Source: PubMed Central
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 10
    Language: English
    In: International journal of environmental research and public health, 2015-12-03, Vol.12 (12), p.15339-15351
    Description: The Internet offers a new chance for health professionals to reach population groups not usually reached through traditional information channels, for example, migrants. Criticism has, however, been raised that most health information on the Internet is not easy to read and lacks cultural sensitivity. We developed an Internet-based bilingual health assistant especially for Turkish migrants in Germany, tested its acceptance, and evaluated its usability in a participatory research design with families with and without Turkish migrant background. The interactive health assistant covered the following: nutrition, physical activity, overweight, diabetes, as well as pregnancy and pregnancy support. The idea of an Internet-based health assistant was generally accepted by all participants of the evaluation study, as long as it would be incorporated in existing appliances, such as smartphones. The bilingual nature of the assistant was welcomed especially by first generation migrants, but migrant participants also indicated that not all health information needed to be made available in a culture-specific way. The participants were least satisfied with the nutrition component, which they felt should include recipes and ingredients from the culture of origin, as well as specific aspects of food preparation.
    Subject(s): Multilingualism ; Consumer Health Information - methods ; Humans ; Middle Aged ; Male ; Turkey - ethnology ; Patient Acceptance of Health Care - psychology ; Patient Acceptance of Health Care - statistics & numerical data ; Patient Acceptance of Health Care - ethnology ; Young Adult ; Community-Based Participatory Research ; Culturally Competent Care - ethnology ; Emigrants and Immigrants - psychology ; Adolescent ; Culturally Competent Care - methods ; Adult ; Female ; Aged ; Internet ; Qualitative Research ; Child ; Germany ; Index Medicus ; migrant health ; information ; technology ; internet ; prevention
    ISSN: 1660-4601
    ISSN: 1661-7827
    E-ISSN: 1660-4601
    Source: PubMed Central
    Source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. More information can be found here...