placeholder
and
and

Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Proceed order?

Export
Filter
Document type
Language
Year
  • 1
    Language: English
    In: Social policy & administration, 2015-12, Vol.49 (7), p.862-886
    Description: The British ‘welfare state’ has been transformed. ‘Welfare’ has been replaced by a new ‘workfare’ regime (the ‘Work Programme’) defined by tougher state regulatory practices for those receiving out‐of‐work benefits. US‐style mandatory community work programmes are being revived and expanded. This article, therefore, considers shifting public attitudes to work and welfare in Britain and changing attitudes to working‐age welfare and out‐of‐work benefits in particular. It also considers the extent to which recent transformations of the state may be explained by declines in traditional labourist politics and class‐based solidarity. Thus, we attempt to develop a richer understanding of changing public attitudes towards welfare and the punitive regulatory ‘workfare’ practices engaged by the modern state in the liberal market economy; reflecting on the nature of the relations between ideology, party policies, popular attitudes and their political impact.
    Subject(s): Workfare ; Social class ; Public opinion ; Welfare state ; Political parties ; Social attitudes ; Workfare programs ; Intervention ; Transformation ; Class politics ; Work attitudes ; Attitudes ; Solidarity ; Community services ; Benefits ; Public assistance programs ; Social policy ; Community work ; Political attitudes ; Welfare ; Ideologies ; Politics ; Market economy ; United Kingdom--UK
    ISSN: 0144-5596
    E-ISSN: 1467-9515
    Source: International Bibliography of the Social Sciences (IBSS)
    Source: Business Source Ultimate
    Source: Academic Search Ultimate
    Source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
    Source: Sociological Abstracts
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    Language: English
    In: Social policy & administration, 2018-09, Vol.52 (5), p.1106-1125
    Description: This article considers the politics of social solidarity from a cross‐national perspective. In the analysis, we rely on four waves of international social survey data for our sample of Western nations, representative of different welfare state traditions. The time span is a 20‐year period and the total country‐wave sample comprises over 40,000 records. While there is popular support for governmental actions to protect citizens in old‐age and sickness, views about the social rights of unemployed citizens are shifting. High‐profile activating labour‐market reforms are reapportioning the burden of risk in society. With the rise of right‐wing populism in Europe and the USA, this article examines how interests change as citizens lose their stake in the means of security – revealing an ever more fragile and fractured social solidarity.
    Subject(s): Social risk ; Comparative social policy ; Class ; Public opinion ; Active social policy ; Fractured ; Social classes ; Class politics ; Traditions ; Citizens ; Public support ; Labor market ; Populism ; Social rights ; Economic reform ; Illnesses ; Reforms ; Welfare state ; Popular support ; Civil rights ; Politics ; Risk society ; Social solidarity ; Social cohesion ; Unemployed people
    ISSN: 0144-5596
    E-ISSN: 1467-9515
    Source: International Bibliography of the Social Sciences (IBSS)
    Source: Business Source Ultimate
    Source: Academic Search Ultimate
    Source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
    Source: Sociological Abstracts
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 3
    Language: English
    In: Journal of social policy, 2013-07, Vol.42 (3), p.541-565
    Description: The idea that the happiness and wellbeing of individuals should shape government policy has been around since the enlightenment; today such thinking has growing practical policy relevance as governments around the world survey their populations in an effort to design social policies that promote wellbeing. In this article, we consider the social determinants of subjective wellbeing in the UK and draw lessons for social policy. Survey data are taken from the ‘Measuring National Wellbeing Programme’ launched by the UK's Office for National Statistics in 2010. For the empirical strategy, we develop bivariate and multivariate logistic regression models, as well as testing for interaction effects in the data. The findings show that wellbeing is not evenly distributed within the UK. Socio-demographic characteristics such as age, gender, ethnicity, employment, household composition and tenure all matter, as does health status. Influencing population wellbeing is inherently complex, though, that said, there is a clear need to place greater emphasis on the social, given the direction of current policy.
    Subject(s): Articles ; Influence ; Quality of life ; Intervention ; Demographic aspects ; Theory ; Enlightenment ; Health problems ; Well being ; Social factors ; Research ; Polls & surveys ; Tenure ; Social policy ; Gross Domestic Product--GDP ; Demographics ; Employment ; Donations ; Population ; Baby boomers ; Composition ; Happiness ; Households ; Health care policy ; Social welfare ; Public policy ; Statistics ; Studies ; Ethnicity ; Health status ; Sociodemographics
    ISSN: 0047-2794
    E-ISSN: 1469-7823
    Source: International Bibliography of the Social Sciences (IBSS)
    Source: Cambridge Journals 2015 HSS Package
    Source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
    Source: Sociological Abstracts
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 4
    Language: English
    In: Social policy and society : a journal of the Social Policy Association, 2017-07, Vol.16 (3), p.405-422
    Description: Celebrating the 25th birthday of Gøsta Esping-Andersen's seminal book The Three Worlds of Welfare Capitalism (1990), this article looks back at the old ‘liberal world’ and examines the new. In so doing, it contributes to debates and the literature on liberal welfare state development in three main ways. First, it considers the concept of ‘liberalism’ and liberal ideas about welfare provision contained within Three Worlds. Here we are also interested in how liberal thought has conceptualised the (welfare) state, and the class-mobilisation theory of welfare-state development. Second, the article elaborates on ‘neo-’liberal social reforms and current welfare arrangements in the English-speaking democracies and their welfare states. Finally, it considers the extent to which the English-speaking world of welfare capitalism is still meaningfully ‘liberal’ and coherent today.
    Subject(s): Articles ; Social policy ; Reforms ; Welfare state ; Books ; Neoliberalism ; Liberalism ; Capitalism
    ISSN: 1474-7464
    E-ISSN: 1475-3073
    Source: International Bibliography of the Social Sciences (IBSS)
    Source: Hellenic Academic Libraries Link
    Source: Cambridge Journals Digital Archives (DFG Nationallizenzen)
    Source: Cambridge Journals 2015 HSS Package
    Source: Sociological Abstracts
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 5
    Article
    Article
    2014
    ISSN: 1440-7833 
    Language: English
    In: Journal of sociology (Melbourne, Vic.), 2014-12, Vol.50 (4), p.577-600
    Description: This article considers the path of social policy and democracy in Australia and the latest set of welfare reforms under Labor. The reforms can be seen to mark a reaction to the excesses of neoliberal government on the one hand, but they also represent continuity in neoliberal thought and policy on the other. As we shall see, engrained ideas about individualist wage-earning welfare, that were established during the formative years of the 20th century, continue to shape, if not constrain collectivist solutions to some of the inherent social risks faced by Australian citizens today. In this light, efforts to create a welfare state geared towards meeting the needs of ‘hard-working’ Australian families appear much sharper.
    Subject(s): Political systems, parties and institutions ; Sociology ; Political sociology ; Social problems and social policy. Social work ; Analysis ; Welfare state ; Welfare reform ; Democracy ; Social policy ; Neoliberalism ; political sociology ; welfare state ; social welfare ; class ; sociology ; labour
    ISSN: 1440-7833
    E-ISSN: 1741-2978
    Source: International Bibliography of the Social Sciences (IBSS)
    Source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
    Source: Sociological Abstracts
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 6
    Language: English
    In: Social policy and society : a journal of the Social Policy Association, 2017-01, Vol.16 (1), p.33-48
    Description: Minimum income protection is gaining new significance in European social policy. In an effort to promote social inclusion, the European Parliament has called on the European Commission and EU Member States to guarantee the minimum right to social safety nets. The Commission has been considering, in the context of the Europe 2020 strategy, the possibility of setting minimum standards for social protection. It is timely then to survey the debates surrounding minimum income standards for Europe and some of the different technologies available for setting reference budgets. A European needs-based (minimum) social protection floor should help guard against poverty and exclusion, but there can be no ‘one size fits all’ in Europe. For it is equally clear that higher social standards of protection may be required by citizens in more affluent parts of Europe. How can such distinctions be made, and what are the challenges arising from doing so?
    Subject(s): Articles ; Standard of living ; Poverty ; Citizens ; Income ; Needs ; Personal income ; Social protection ; Minimum wages ; Social integration ; Methodological problems ; Social policy ; Welfare state ; Safety ; Budgets ; Protection ; Parliament ; Member states ; Social closure ; Europe
    ISSN: 1474-7464
    E-ISSN: 1475-3073
    Source: International Bibliography of the Social Sciences (IBSS)
    Source: Hellenic Academic Libraries Link
    Source: Cambridge Journals Digital Archives (DFG Nationallizenzen)
    Source: Cambridge Journals 2015 HSS Package
    Source: Sociological Abstracts
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 7
    Language: English
    In: Journal of sociology (Melbourne, Vic.), 2017-03, Vol.53 (1), p.162-181
    Description: This article attempts to forge new links between social attitudes and social policy change in Australia. Drawing on four survey waves of international social survey data and using multivariable regression analysis, this article sheds new light on the determinants of Australian attitudes towards the welfare state in a comparative perspective. It examines their variations across time and social groupings and then compares Australian welfare attitudes with those found in other leading western economies. While there is popular support for government actions to protect Australian citizens in old age and sickness, views about social protection and labour market policy for the working-age population are divided. The comparative analysis and the focus on class-attitude linkages allows for further critical reflection on the nature of social relations and recent social reforms enacted by the Liberal-National coalition government.
    Subject(s): Political activity ; Social policy ; Australians ; International Social Survey Programme ; Quantitative research ; Working class ; Political sociology ; Attitudes ; Socioeconomic status ; Welfare state ; Social welfare ; Comparative studies ; Gender differences ; Income support ; Social services ; Public health ; Age differences ; Surveys ; Sociological research ; Public opinion ; Attitude (Psychology) ; Intervention ; Labor market ; Social reform ; Citizens ; Social protection ; Employment policies ; Polls & surveys ; Coalition governments ; Social attitudes ; Policy making ; Social relations ; Illnesses ; Older people ; Popular support ; Citizen participation ; Comparative analysis ; Protection ; Social change ; Quantitative analysis
    ISSN: 1440-7833
    E-ISSN: 1741-2978
    Source: International Bibliography of the Social Sciences (IBSS)
    Source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
    Source: Sociological Abstracts
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 8
    Language: English
    In: Journal of social policy, 2015-04, Vol.44 (2), p.297-318
    Description: The concept of the ‘social investment state’ refocuses attention on the productive function of social policy eclipsed for some time by the emphasis on its social protection or compensation roles. Here we distinguish between different social investment strategies, the Nordic ‘heavy’ and the Liberal ‘light’, with particular reference to the inclusive growth approach adopted in Australia. In 2007, social democrats in Australia returned to government with a clear mandate to reject the labour market deregulation and other neoliberal policies of its predecessor, and to tackle entrenched social and economic disadvantage in Australian society. For the last five years, social investment and inclusive growth has been at the centre of the Australian social policy agenda. Against this background, the article examines and critically assesses the (re)turn to ‘social investment’ thinking in Australia during Labor's term in office (2007–13). Analysis focuses not just on what was actually achieved, but also on the constraining role of prevailing economic and political circumstances and on the processes that were used to drive social investment reform. In many ways, the article goes some way to exposing ongoing tensions surrounding the distinctiveness of ‘social investment’ strategies pursued by leftist parties within the (neo)liberal state.
    Subject(s): Articles ; Social policy ; Deregulation ; Australia ; Socially responsible investments ; Analysis ; Left wing politics ; Wages & salaries ; Labor market ; Economic policy ; Function ; Distinctiveness ; 21st century ; Education ; Investments ; Reforms ; Compensation ; Cooperation ; Welfare state ; Paradigms ; Social function ; Protection ; Political parties ; Liberalism ; Human capital ; Social reform ; Investment policy ; Social protection ; Neoliberalism ; Democracy ; Social investing
    ISSN: 0047-2794
    E-ISSN: 1469-7823
    Source: International Bibliography of the Social Sciences (IBSS)
    Source: Cambridge Journals 2015 HSS Package
    Source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
    Source: Sociological Abstracts
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 9
    Article
    Article
    2016
    ISSN: 1474-7464 
    Language: English
    In: Social policy and society : a journal of the Social Policy Association, 2016-04, Vol.15 (2), p.159-175
    Description: Political and administrative processes are leading to collectively undesirable and intolerable societal outcomes in the advanced liberal democracies, as policymakers seek to address social issues in the design and implementation of new social policies that actively govern conduct. Behavioural regulation is the order of the day. For scholars interested in the development of social policy and the idea of a society as a whole, it is timely to begin the revaluation of the very notion of social policy and society beyond the ‘active’ neoliberal policy paradigm. Here we are particularly concerned with the ends and means of the coercive policy instruments and the active ethical issues arising from their use.
    Subject(s): Articles ; Policy making ; Social policy ; Social development ; Social issues ; Policy implementation ; Ethical dilemmas ; Regulation ; Society ; Neoliberalism ; Coercion ; Ethical aspects ; Development policy
    ISSN: 1474-7464
    E-ISSN: 1475-3073
    Source: International Bibliography of the Social Sciences (IBSS)
    Source: Hellenic Academic Libraries Link
    Source: Cambridge Journals Digital Archives (DFG Nationallizenzen)
    Source: Cambridge Journals 2015 HSS Package
    Source: Sociological Abstracts
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 10
    Language: English
    In: Social policy & administration, 2013-12, Vol.47 (6), p.668-691
    Description: In his celebrated work of comparative policy, Francis Castles argued that a radical wage‐earning model of welfare had evolved in Australia and New Zealand over the course of the 20th century. The Castles' thesis is shown to have two parts: first, the ‘fourth world of welfare’ argument that rests upon protection of workers; and, second, an emphasis on the path‐dependent nature of social policy. It is perfectly possible to accept the second premise of the argument without the first, and indeed many do so. It is also possible to accept the importance of wage level protection concerns in Australasian social policy without accepting the complete fourth world thesis. This article explores the path of social democracy in Australia and New Zealand and the continuing importance of labour market regulation, as well as considering the extent to which that emphasis still makes Australasian social policy distinctive in the modern age. The argument focuses on the data and policies relating to labour market protection and wages, as well the systems of welfare and social protection, and the comparative information on poverty and inequality.
    Subject(s): New Zealand ; Social class ; Australia ; Welfare state analysis ; Social democracy ; Working class in television ; Working class ; Proletariat ; Analysis ; Social classes ; Politics ; History ; Welfare
    ISSN: 0144-5596
    E-ISSN: 1467-9515
    Source: International Bibliography of the Social Sciences (IBSS)
    Source: Business Source Ultimate
    Source: Academic Search Ultimate
    Source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
    Source: Sociological Abstracts
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. More information can be found here...