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  • 1
    Article
    Article
    2013
    ISSN: 0022-166X  ISSN: 1548-8004 
    Language: English
    In: The Journal of human resources, 2013-04-01, Vol.48 (2), p.370-403
    Description: We investigate the effects of a positive income shock on mental health among adolescent girls using evidence from a cash transfer experiment in Malawi. Offers of cash transfers strongly reduced psychological distress among baseline schoolgirls. However, these large beneficial effects declined with increases in the transfer amount offered to the parents conditional on regular school attendance by the adolescent girls. Improved physical health, increased school attendance, personal consumption, and leisure contributed to the effects. There was also strong evidence of increased psychological distress among untreated baseline schoolgirls in treatment areas. All of these effects dissipated soon after the program ended.
    Subject(s): Economic assistance, Domestic ; Malawi ; Özler, Berk ; Teenage girls ; Psychology ; Psychological aspects ; Education grants
    ISSN: 0022-166X
    ISSN: 1548-8004
    E-ISSN: 1548-8004
    Source: Business Source Ultimate
    Source: Project MUSE - Premium Collection
    Source: JSTOR Arts & Sciences IV
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  • 2
    Language: English
    In: The Journal of development studies, 2019-12-13, Vol.55, p.107-127
    Description: This study documents the impact of a cash transfer programme - known as the No Lost Generation Programme (NLG) and locally as Min Ila ('from to') - on the school participation of displaced Syrian children in Lebanon. An initiative of the government of Lebanon, the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF), and the World Food Programme (WFP), the programme provided cash for the benefit of children enrolled in afternoon shifts at public primary schools. It was designed to cover the cost of commuting to school and to compensate households for income forgone because children were attending school instead of working. Commuting costs and forgone income are two critical barriers to child school participation. The analysis relies on a geographical regression discontinuity design to identify the impact halfway through the first year of programme operation, the 2016/2017 school year. The analysis finds substantive impacts on school attendance among enrolled children, which increased by 0.5 days to 0.7 days per week, an improvement of about 20 per cent relative to the control group. School enrolment among Syrian children rose rapidly across all Lebanon's governorates during the period of the evaluation, resulting in supply-side capacity constraints that appear to have dampened positive enrolment impacts.
    ISSN: 0022-0388
    E-ISSN: 1743-9140
    Source: Taylor & Francis Open Access
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  • 3
    Language: English
    In: The Journal of human resources, 2019, Vol.54 (2), p.503-531
    Subject(s): Social aspects ; Education ; Child labor ; Philippines ; Finance
    ISSN: 0022-166X
    E-ISSN: 1548-8004
    Source: Business Source Ultimate
    Source: Project MUSE - Premium Collection
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  • 4
    Language: English
    In: Journal of population economics, 2018-04, Vol.31 (2), p.453-481
    Description: Programs that increase the economic capacity of poor women can have cascading effects on children’s participation in school and work that are theoretically undetermined. We present a simple model to describe the possible channels through which these programs may affect children’s activities. Based on a cluster-randomized trial, we examine how a program providing capital and training to women in poor rural communities in Nicaragua affected children. Children in beneficiary households are more likely to attend school 1 year after the end of the intervention. An increase in women’s influence on household decisions appears to contribute to the program’s beneficial effect on school attendance.
    Subject(s): Economics ; Population Economics ; Demography ; Women’s economic capacity ; Child labor ; H43 ; D13 ; J22 ; I25 ; J24 ; Labor Economics ; Female empowerment ; Field experiment ; O22 ; O15 ; Nicaragua ; Q12 ; Social Policy ; Human capital accumulation ; Capital formation ; Children ; Poor women ; Child labor practices ; Employment ; Analysis
    ISSN: 0933-1433
    E-ISSN: 1432-1475
    Source: Business Source Ultimate
    Source: EconLit with Full Text
    Source: Academic Search Ultimate
    Source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
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  • 5
    Language: English
    In: The Journal of development studies, 2019-12-13, Vol.55, p.1-6
    Description: Effective social protection is increasingly as essential to supporting affected populations in situations of protracted instability and displacement. Despite the growing use of social protection in these settings, there is comparatively little rigorous research on what works, for whom, and why. This special issue contributes by adding seven high-quality studies that raise substantially our understanding of the role of social protection in fragile contexts and in settings of forced displacement and migration. Together, these studies fill knowledge gaps, help support informed decision-making by policy-makers and practitioners, and demonstrate that impact evaluation and the analysis of social protection in challenging humanitarian settings are possible. The studies provide evidence that design choices in implementation, such as which population to target, choice of transfer modality or which messages are delivered with programmes, can make a substantial difference in the realisation of positive benefits among vulnerable populations. Furthermore, the findings of the studies underline the relevance of tailoring programme components to populations, which may benefit more or less from traditional programme implementation models.
    ISSN: 0022-0388
    E-ISSN: 1743-9140
    Source: Taylor & Francis Open Access
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  • 6
    Language: English
    In: BMJ open, 2019-10-14, Vol.9 (10), p.e027047-e027047
    Description: ObjectivesTo define key stressors experienced and coping behaviours within poor agrarian communities in sub-Saharan Africa.DesignDescriptive qualitative study incorporating inductive thematic analysis.Participants81 participants purposely sampled, stratified by age (adolescents and young adults) and sexSettingThe study was conducted in villages in Ghana, Malawi, and Tanzania.ResultsStressors were thematically grouped into those directly related to poverty and the lack of basic necessities (eg, food insecurity), and additional stressors (eg, drought) that worsen poverty-related stress. Impacts on functioning, health and well-being and key coping behaviours, both positive and negative, were identified. The findings together inform a more nuanced view of stress within these contexts.ConclusionAlthough participants were asked to provide general reflections about stress in their community, the salience of poverty-related stressors was ubiquitously reflected in respondents’ responses. Poverty-related stressors affect development, well-being and gender-based violence. Future research should focus on interventions to alleviate poverty-related stress to achieve the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals.
    Subject(s): Young adults ; Poverty ; Mental health ; Objectives ; Research ; Stress ; Education ; Socioeconomic factors ; Human immunodeficiency virus--HIV ; Teenagers ; Coping ; Health surveys ; Interviews ; Public health ; Community ; Index Medicus
    ISSN: 2044-6055
    E-ISSN: 2044-6055
    Source: HighWire Press (Free Journals)
    Source: PubMed Central
    Source: © ProQuest LLC All rights reserved〈img src="https://exlibris-pub.s3.amazonaws.com/PQ_Logo.jpg" style="vertical-align:middle;margin-left:7px"〉
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  • 7
    Language: English
    In: Studies in family planning, 2018-12-01, Vol.49 (4), p.295-317
    Description: There is increasing interest in the ability of cash transfers to facilitate safe transitions to adulthood in low-income settings; however, evidence from scaled-up government programming demonstrating this potential is scarce. Using two experimental evaluations of unconditional cash transfers targeted to ultra-poor and labor-constrained households over approximately three years in Malawi and Zambia, we examine whether cash transfers delayed early marriage and pregnancy among youth aged 14 to 21 years at baseline. Although we find strong impacts on poverty and schooling, two main pathways hypothesized in the literature, we find limited impacts on safe transition outcomes for both males and females. In addition, despite hypotheses that social norms may constrain potential impacts of cash transfer programs, we show suggestive evidence that pre-program variation in social norms across communities does not significantly affect program impact. We conclude with policy implications and suggestions for future research.
    Subject(s): Money transfer ; Fertility ; Analysis ; Teenage marriage ; Index Medicus
    ISSN: 0039-3665
    E-ISSN: 1728-4465
    Source: EconLit with Full Text
    Source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
    Source: © ProQuest LLC All rights reserved〈img src="https://exlibris-pub.s3.amazonaws.com/PQ_Logo.jpg" style="vertical-align:middle;margin-left:7px"〉
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  • 8
    Article
    Article
    2013
    ISSN: 0022-166X 
    Language: English
    In: The Journal of human resources, 2013, Vol.48 (2), p.370-403
    ISSN: 0022-166X
    E-ISSN: 1548-8004
    Source: Business Source Ultimate
    Source: Project MUSE - Premium Collection
    Source: JSTOR Arts & Sciences IV
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  • 9
    Language: English
    In: The World Bank economic review, 2020-10, Vol.34 (3), p.670-697
    Description: Cash transfer programs are rapidly becoming a key component of the social safety net of many countries in Sub-Saharan Africa. The primary aim of these programs is to help households improve their food security and to smooth consumption during periods of economic duress. However, beneficiary households have also been shown to use these programs to expand their microentrepreneurial activities. Cluster-randomized trials carried out during the rollout of large-scale programs in Malawi and Zambia show that children may increase their work in the household enterprise through such programs. Both programs increased forms of work that may be detrimental to children, such as activities that expose children to hazards in Malawi and excessive working hours in Zambia. However, both programs also induced positive changes in other child well-being domains, such as school attendance and material well-being, leading to a mixed and inconclusive picture of the implications of these programs for children.
    ISSN: 0258-6770
    E-ISSN: 1564-698X
    Source: Business Source Ultimate
    Source: EconLit with Full Text
    Source: World Bank e-Library
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  • 10
    Article
    Article
    2014
    ISSN: 0257-3032  ISSN: 1564-6971 
    Language: English
    In: The World Bank research observer, 2014-08-01, Vol.29 (2), p.202-234
    Description: Cash transfer programs are widely used in settings where child labor is prevalent. Although many of these programs are explicitly implemented to improve children's welfare, in theory their impact on child labor is undetermined. This paper systematically reviews the empirical evidence on the impact of cash transfers, conditional and unconditional, on child labor. We find no evidence that cash transfer interventions increase child labor in practice. On the contrary, there is broad evidence that conditional and unconditional cash transfers lower both children's participation in child labor and their hours worked and that these transfers cushion the effect of economic shocks that may lead households to use child labor as a coping strategy. Boys experience particularly strong decreases in economic activities, whereas girls experience such decreases in household chores. Our findings underline the usefulness of cash transfers as a relatively safe policy instrument to improve child welfare but also point to knowledge gaps, for instance regarding the interplay between cash transfers and other interventions, that should be addressed in future evaluations to provide detailed policy advice.
    Subject(s): World Bank ; Working papers ; Child labor ; Cash transfers ; Child welfare ; Conditional cash transfer programs ; Pension plans ; Economic development ; Age ; Age groups ; school attendance ; working children ; conditional cash transfer ; adolescents ; accounting ; child health ; social protection ; child labor ; teenage girls
    ISSN: 0257-3032
    ISSN: 1564-6971
    E-ISSN: 1564-6971
    Source: EconLit with Full Text
    Source: World Bank e-Library
    Source: JSTOR Arts & Sciences VI
    Source: Oxford Journals 2016 Current and Archive A-Z Collection
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