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  • 1
    Language: English
    In: Sustainability (Basel, Switzerland), 2020, Vol.12 (9), p.3811
    Description: This paper describes the development of care farming in the Netherlands, one of the pioneering countries in this sector, where care farming has developed into a very diverse sector, with some farmers focussing primarily on agricultural production and others more specifically on providing care services. Care farms are increasingly open to a diversity of participants. The sector has become professionalised with the establishment of strong regional organisations and a steady growth increase in revenues, providing employment opportunities and boosting the economy of rural areas. In this paper, we highlight two promising innovations in care farming: education for school dropouts and the establishment of social farming activities in cities. These innovations face the challenge of connecting not only the agricultural and care sectors, but also the educational sector and the urban context. Initiators face a number of challenges, like trying to embed their activities in the educational sector, a mismatch in regulations and a lack of legitimacy in the case of education on care farms, as well as problems gaining access to land and a lack of recognition in the case of social farming in urban areas. However, the prospects are promising in both cases, because they match the changing demands in Dutch society and are able to integrate social, ecological and economic benefits. View Full-Text
    Subject(s): Agro Multi Functioneel Landgebruik ; Alterra - Regional development and spatial use ; Alterra - Regionale ontwikkeling en ruimtegebruik ; care farm ; education ; Gezondheid en Maatschappij ; Health and Society ; innovation ; Land Use and Food Security ; Landgebruik en Voedselzekerheid ; Leerstoelgroep Rurale sociologie ; LEI Performance and Impact Agrosectors ; LEI Performance en Impact Agrosectoren ; Performance and Impact Agrosectors ; Performance en Impact Agrosectoren ; PPO/PRI AGRO Multifunctioneel Landgebruik ; Regional Development and Spatial Use ; Regionale Ontwikkeling en Ruimtegebruik ; Rural Sociology ; Rurale Sociologie ; social farming ; urban farming
    ISSN: 2071-1050
    E-ISSN: 2071-1050
    Source: ProQuest Central
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  • 2
    Language: English
    In: Animals (Basel), 2017, Vol.7 (6), p.45
    Description: We explore the role of farm animals in providing care to different types of participants at care farms (e.g., youngsters with behavioural problems, people with severe mental problems and people with dementia). Care farms provide alternative and promising settings where people can interact with animals compared to a therapeutic healthcare setting. We performed a literature review, conducted focus group meetings and carried out secondary data-analysis of qualitative studies involving care farmers and different types of participants. We found that farm animals are important to many participants and have a large number of potential benefits. They can (i) provide meaningful day occupation; (ii) generate valued relationships; (iii) help people master tasks; (iv) provide opportunities for reciprocity; (v) can distract people from them problems; (vi) provide relaxation; (vii) facilitate customized care; (viii) facilitate relationships with other people; (ix) stimulate healthy behavior; (x) contribute to a welcoming environment; (xi) make it possible to experience basic elements of life; and (xii) provide opportunities for reflection and feedback. This shows the multi-facetted importance of interacting with animals on care farms. In this study the types of activities with animals and their value to different types of participants varied. Farm animals are an important element of the care farm environment that can address the care needs of different types of participants.
    Subject(s): Care farm ; Dementia ; Farm animals ; Mental illness ; Youth
    ISSN: 2076-2615
    E-ISSN: 2076-2615
    Source: Academic Search Ultimate
    Source: PubMed Central
    Source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
    Source: ProQuest Central
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  • 3
    Language: English
    In: Ageing and society, 2021, Vol.41 (3), p.582-604
    Description: Nature-based adult day services (ADSs) in urban areas are relatively new services in the Netherlands. Since knowledge about these services is still scarce, this study aimed to elucidate their value for people with dementia and their family carers in terms of health and wellbeing. We interviewed 39 people with dementia attending nature-based ADSs in urban areas and their family carers, and 17 providers of these services. Respondents indicated that nature-based ADSs in urban areas positively affected the health and wellbeing of people with dementia. According to them, these services support contact with nature and animals, activity engagement, physical activity, structure, social interactions, healthy eating, a sense of meaning in life and a focus on normal daily life. Respondents further indicated that these services stimulate respite, reassurance and maintenance of family carers' own activities and social contacts. We conclude that nature-based ADSs in urban areas have a wide range of benefits that might affect the health and wellbeing of people with dementia and their family carers. Worldwide, demand is growing for innovative practices in dementia care. It is therefore worthwhile monitoring the development of dementia care innovations, such as nature-based ADSs, and for countries to exchange lessons learned from these services.
    Subject(s): Activities of daily living ; Adult care services ; adult day services ; Agriculture ; care farm ; Caregivers ; Dementia ; Entrepreneurs ; Everyday life ; Families & family life ; family carers ; Farmers ; Farms ; Gardens & gardening ; green care ; Health services ; Healthy food ; Innovations ; Interviews ; Long term health care ; Meaning ; nature-based services ; Nursing care ; Nursing homes ; Outdoor activities ; Physical activity ; Reassurance ; Rural areas ; Social entrepreneurship ; Social interaction ; Urban areas ; Value ; Well being
    ISSN: 0144-686X
    E-ISSN: 1469-1779
    Source: International Bibliography of the Social Sciences (IBSS)
    Source: Hellenic Academic Libraries Link
    Source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
    Source: Sociological Abstracts
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  • 4
    Language: English
    In: BMC health services research, 2011-10-14, Vol.11 (1), p.272-272
    Description: Pay-for-performance (P4P) is increasingly implemented in the healthcare system to encourage improvements in healthcare quality. P4P is a payment model that rewards healthcare providers for meeting pre-established targets for delivery of healthcare services by financial incentives. Based on their performance, healthcare providers receive either additional or reduced payment. Currently, little is known about P4P schemes intending to improve delivery of chronic care through disease management. The objectives of this paper are therefore to provide an overview of P4P schemes used to stimulate delivery of chronic care through disease management and to provide insight into their effects on healthcare quality and costs. A systematic PubMed search was performed for English language papers published between 2000 and 2010 describing P4P schemes related to the implementation of disease management. Wagner's chronic care model was used to make disease management operational. Eight P4P schemes were identified, introduced in the USA (n = 6), Germany (n = 1), and Australia (n = 1). Five P4P schemes were part of a larger scheme of interventions to improve quality of care, whereas three P4P schemes were solely implemented. Most financial incentives were rewards, selective, and granted on the basis of absolute performance. More variation was found in incented entities and the basis for providing incentives. Information about motivation, certainty, size, frequency, and duration of the financial incentives was generally limited. Five studies were identified that evaluated the effects of P4P on healthcare quality. Most studies showed positive effects of P4P on healthcare quality. No studies were found that evaluated the effects of P4P on healthcare costs. The number of P4P schemes to encourage disease management is limited. Hardly any information is available about the effects of such schemes on healthcare quality and costs.
    Subject(s): Care and treatment ; Chronic diseases ; Cost control ; Diagnosis ; Disease Management ; Employee performance ; Health Care Costs - statistics & numerical data ; Health care policy ; Health services ; Hospitals ; Humans ; Incentive plans ; Information systems ; Long-Term Care - economics ; Long-Term Care - standards ; Managed care ; Manuscripts ; Medical case management ; Methods ; Pay for performance ; Prospective payment systems ; Quality of Health Care - statistics & numerical data ; Reimbursement, Incentive ; Systems design ; Usage
    ISSN: 1472-6963
    E-ISSN: 1472-6963
    Source: BioMedCentral Open Access
    Source: Academic Search Ultimate
    Source: PubMed Central
    Source: DOAJ Directory of Open Access Journals - Not for CDI Discovery
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  • 5
    Language: English
    In: International journal of environmental research and public health, 2021-10-01, Vol.18 (20), p.10747
    Description: The culture change movement within long-term care in which radical changes in the physical, social and organizational care environments are being implemented provides opportunities for the development of innovative long-term care facilities. The aim of this study was to investigate which competencies care staff working at green care farms and other innovative types of small-scale long-term dementia care facilities require, according to care staff themselves and managers, and how these competencies were different from those of care staff working in more traditional large-scale long-term dementia care facilities. A qualitative descriptive research design was used. Interviews were conducted with care staff (n = 19) and managers (n = 23) across a diverse range of long-term facilities. Thematic content analysis was used. Two competencies were mainly mentioned by participants working in green care farms: (1) being able to integrate activities for residents into daily practice, and (2) being able to undertake multiple responsibilities. Two other competencies for working in long-term dementia care in general were identified: (3) having good communication skills, and (4) being able to provide medical and direct care activities. This study found unique competencies at green care farms, showing that providing care in innovative long-term care facilities requires looking further than the physical environment and the design of a care facility; it is crucial to look at the role of care staff and the competencies they require.
    Subject(s): care environment ; competencies ; dementia ; EDUCATED REGISTERED NURSES ; ELDERLY-PEOPLE ; EXPERIENCES ; innovative design ; long-term care ; NURSING-HOMES ; PREFERENCES ; RIGOUR ; SPACES
    ISSN: 1660-4601
    ISSN: 1661-7827
    E-ISSN: 1660-4601
    Source: PubMed Central
    Source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
    Source: DOAJ Directory of Open Access Journals - Not for CDI Discovery
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  • 6
    Language: English
    In: BMC geriatrics, 2017-12, Vol.17 (1), p.132-132
    Description: Background A wide range of initiatives on early detection and intervention have been developed to proactively identify problems related to health and wellbeing in (frail) older people, with the aim of supporting them to live independently for as long as possible. Nevertheless, it remains unclear what the best way is to design such initiatives and how older people’s needs and preferences can be best addressed. This study aimed to address this gap in the literature by exploring: 1) older people’s perspectives on health and living environment in relation to living independently at home; 2) older people’s needs and preferences in relation to initiating and receiving care and support; and 3) professionals’ views on what would be necessary to enable the alignment of early detection initiatives with older people’s own needs and preferences. Methods In this qualitative study, we conducted semi-structured interviews with 36 older people and 19 professionals in proactive elderly care. Data were analysed using the framework analysis method. Results From the interviews with older people important themes in relation to health and living environment emerged, such as maintaining independence, appropriate housing, social relationships, a supporting network and a sense of purpose and autonomy. Older people preferred to remain self-sufficient, and they would rather not ask for help for psychological or social problems. However, the interviews also highlighted that they were not always able or willing to anticipate future needs, which can hinder early detection or early intervention. At the same time, professionals indicated that older people tend to over-estimate their self-reliance and therefore advocated for early detection and intervention, including social and psychological issues. Conclusion Older people have a broad range of needs in different domains of life. Discrepancies exist between older people and professionals with regard to their views on timing and scope of early detection initiatives. This study aimed to reveal starting-points for better alignment between initiatives and older people’s needs and preferences. Such starting points may support policy makers and care professionals involved in early detection initiatives to make more informed decisions. Keywords: Early detection, Frailty, Health, Health care ,Older people, Proactive elderly care, Social care, Wellbeing, Qualitative research
    Subject(s): Aged ; Aged, 80 and over ; Attitude of Health Personnel ; Attitude to Health ; Early detection ; Early Diagnosis ; Female ; Frail Elderly ; Frailty ; Health ; Health aspects ; Health care ; Health Services Needs and Demand ; Health Status ; Humans ; Independent Living ; Male ; Medical care ; Middle Aged ; Netherlands ; Older people ; Proactive elderly care ; Qualitative Research ; Research ; Social care ; Wellbeing
    ISSN: 1471-2318
    E-ISSN: 1471-2318
    Source: BioMedCentral Open Access
    Source: PubMed Central
    Source: DOAJ Directory of Open Access Journals - Not for CDI Discovery
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  • 7
    Language: English
    In: International journal of environmental research and public health, 2021-06-01, Vol.18 (11), p.5701
    Description: Many informal caregivers of older adults combine their caregiving tasks with a paid job. Adequate support is important to enable them to combine paid work with caregiving, while maintaining their health and wellbeing. To date, however, knowledge about working caregivers' support needs is fragmented. This study, therefore, aimed to obtain more insight into the support needs of working caregivers of older adults. We conducted six online semi-structured focus group interviews with in total 25 working caregivers of older adults living at home. Data were complemented with information from seven working caregivers participating in the study's advisory board. Data were analyzed using inductive and deductive thematic analysis. Six themes related to working caregivers' needs were identified: (1) Recognition of caregivers, including the challenges they face; (2) Attention for caregivers' health, wellbeing and ability to cope; (3) Opportunities to share care responsibilities; (4) Help with finding and arranging care and support; (5) Understanding and support from the work environment; (6) Technological support tailored to the needs and capacities of caregivers and older adults. To address these needs, working caregivers suggested several options in multiple domains of life (i.e., work, home and social life, care environment, personal health and wellbeing). To successfully support them, a multi-faceted effort, involving actors from multiple settings, is needed.
    Subject(s): Elderly ; Family care ; Focus groups ; Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis ; Informal care ; Needs ; Older adults ; Pollution ; Preferences ; Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health ; Qualitative research ; Support ; Working caregivers
    ISSN: 1660-4601
    ISSN: 1661-7827
    E-ISSN: 1660-4601
    Source: PubMed Central
    Source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
    Source: DOAJ Directory of Open Access Journals - Not for CDI Discovery
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  • 8
    Language: English
    In: Journal of healthcare leadership, 2020, Vol.12, p.11-18
    Description: There is growing recognition that traditional dementia care models fall short for people with dementia and their family caregivers. This has led to a call for new dementia care approaches. In response to this call, innovations in long-term dementia care are taking place both in the community and in residential care. One of these innovations is the care concept called “care farming”. Care farms are farms that combine agricultural activities with care and support services for a variety of client groups, including people with dementia. Although the concept is being implemented in an increasing number of countries, the Netherlands and Norway are still front-runners in providing and researching this innovative dementia care approach. Over the last couple of years, several research projects have been carried out in these countries addressing a wide range of issues related to dementia care provision at care farms and using a wide range of research methods. This paper synthesizes the knowledge that has been generated in these research projects. By sharing the knowledge obtained in the Netherlands and Norway, we hope to inspire leaders in healthcare undertaking similar efforts to innovate care for the increasing number of people with dementia. By providing starting-points for future research, we additionally hope to contribute to a research agenda to further advance the field.
    Subject(s): Agricultural industry ; Agriculture ; Care farms ; Caregivers ; Dementia ; Dementia care ; Farmers ; Farms ; Green care ; Innovation ; Leadership ; Nursing care ; Nursing homes ; Patient-centered care ; Person-centered care ; Quality of life ; Retirement communities
    ISSN: 1179-3201
    E-ISSN: 1179-3201
    Source: PubMed Central
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  • 9
    Language: English
    In: BMC family practice, 2014, Vol.15 (1), p.61-61
    Description: Background Multimorbidity is common among ageing populations and it affects the demand for health services. The objective of this study was to examine the relationship between multimorbidity (i.e. the number of diseases and specific combinations of diseases) and the use of general practice services in the Dutch population of 55 years and older. Methods Data on diagnosed chronic diseases, contacts (including face-to-face consultations, phone contacts, and home visits), drug prescription rates, and referral rates to specialised care were derived from the Netherlands Information Network of General Practice (LINH), limited to patients whose data were available from 2006 to 2008 (N = 32,583). Multimorbidity was defined as having two or more out of 28 chronic diseases. Multilevel analyses adjusted for age, gender, and clustering of patients in general practices were used to assess the association between multimorbidity and service utilization in 2008. Results Patients diagnosed with multiple chronic diseases had on average 18.3 contacts (95% CI 16.8 19.9) per year. This was significantly higher than patients with one chronic disease (11.7 contacts (10.8 12.6)) or without any (6.1 contacts (5.6 6.6)). A higher number of chronic diseases was associated with more contacts, more prescriptions, and more referrals to specialized care. However, the number of contacts per disease decreased with an increasing number of diseases; patients with a single disease had between 9 to 17 contacts a year and patients with five or more diseases had 5 or 6 contacts per disease per year. Contact rates for specific combinations of diseases were lower than what would be expected on the basis of contact rates of the separate diseases. Conclusion Multimorbidity is associated with increased health care utilization in general practice, yet the increase declines per additional disease. Still, with the expected rise in multimorbidity in the coming decades more extensive health resources are required.
    Subject(s): Aged ; Aged, 80 and over ; Cardiovascular disease ; Chronic Disease ; Chronic illnesses ; Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease ; Classification ; Comorbidity ; Epidemiology ; Female ; General Practice ; Health care ; Health care utilisation ; Health services ; Health Services Research ; Heart failure ; Humans ; Male ; Medical records ; Middle Aged ; Multimorbidity ; Netherlands - epidemiology ; Older people ; Patient Acceptance of Health Care ; Problems ; Public health
    ISSN: 1471-2296
    E-ISSN: 1471-2296
    Source: BioMedCentral Open Access
    Source: Academic Search Ultimate
    Source: PubMed Central
    Source: DOAJ Directory of Open Access Journals - Not for CDI Discovery
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  • 10
    Language: English
    In: Ageing and society, 2015-04, Vol.35 (4), p.704-724
    Description: Responsibility for health and social care services is being delegated from central to local authorities in an increasing number of countries. In the Netherlands, the planned transfer of responsibility for day care for people with dementia from the central government to municipalities is a case in point. The impacts of this decentralisation process for innovative care concepts such as day care at green care farms are largely unknown. We therefore interviewed representatives of municipalities and green care farms to explore what consequences they expected of decentralisation for their organisations and people with dementia. Our study shows that communication and collaboration between municipalities and green care farms is relatively limited. Consequently, municipalities are insufficiently aware of how green care farms can help them to perform their new tasks and green care farmers know little about what municipalities expect from them in the new situation. We therefore recommend that municipalities and green care farms keep each other informed about their responsibilities, duties and activities to ensure a tailored package of future municipal services for people with dementia.
    Subject(s): Adult day care ; Articles ; Care and treatment ; Central Government ; Child care ; Child Care Services ; Cooperation ; Decentralization (Management) ; Dementia ; Farmers ; Farms ; Health Care Services ; Long-term care of the sick ; Management ; Municipalities ; Netherlands ; perspective ; Senility ; Social Services ; social support ; western-european countries
    ISSN: 0144-686X
    E-ISSN: 1469-1779
    Source: International Bibliography of the Social Sciences (IBSS)
    Source: Hellenic Academic Libraries Link
    Source: Cambridge Journals 2015 HSS Package
    Source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
    Source: Sociological Abstracts
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