placeholder
and
and

Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Proceed order?

Export
Filter
Document type
Language
Year
  • 1
    Language: English
    In: Fertility and sterility, 2016, Vol.105 (6), p.1589-1593
    Description: Objective To determine the best practices of intrauterine insemination with the partner's fresh sperm. Design Prospective multicenter observational study. Setting Assisted reproduction technology (ART) centers. Patient(s) Seven hundred and seven patients entering the program, regardless of age or cause of infertility. Intervention(s) Intrauterine insemination by standard procedures. Main Outcome Measure(s) Effect of patient characteristics (duration of infertility, indications, age, parity, body mass index, semen parameters) as well as IUI parameters on delivery rates per couple or per attempt. Result(s) The overall live birth rate was 11.4% per cycle, varying from 8.4% to 17.6% between centers. The main differences in practice that had a statistically significant impact on the delivery rate were the use of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) antagonists (15.2% with versus 9.4% without) and the number of mature recruited follicles (9.4% for one versus 15.2% for two). Conclusion(s) Our results indicate that the use of GnRH antagonists has a positive effect on the delivery rate, especially in the multifollicular stimulations that are required when women are older than 27 years.
    Subject(s): Internal Medicine ; Obstetrics and Gynecology ; Delivery ; IUI ; GnRH antagonist ; ovarian stimulation ; France - epidemiology ; Prospective Studies ; Humans ; Middle Aged ; Reproductive Techniques, Assisted - standards ; Male ; Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone - antagonists & inhibitors ; Insemination, Artificial - trends ; Hormone Antagonists - pharmacology ; Pregnancy ; Young Adult ; Insemination, Artificial - standards ; Insemination, Artificial - methods ; Adult ; Female ; Hormone Antagonists - therapeutic use ; Pregnancy Rate - trends ; Reproductive Techniques, Assisted - trends ; Index Medicus
    ISSN: 0015-0282
    E-ISSN: 1556-5653
    Source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    Language: English
    In: PloS one, 2016, Vol.11 (3), p.e0150857-e0150857
    Description: In animal studies, extensive data revealed the influence of culture medium on embryonic development, foetal growth and the behaviour of offspring. However, this impact has never been investigated in humans. For the first time, we investigated in depth the effects of embryo culture media on health, growth and development of infants conceived by In Vitro Fertilization until the age of 5 years old. This single-centre cohort study was based on an earlier randomized study. During six months, in vitro fertilization attempts (No. 371) were randomized according to two media (Single Step Medium--SSM group) or Global medium (Global group). This randomized study was stopped prematurely as significantly lower pregnancy and implantation rates were observed in the SSM group. Singletons (No. 73) conceived in the randomized study were included (42 for Global and 31 for SSM). The medical data for gestational, neonatal and early childhood periods were extracted from medical records and parental interviews (256 variables recorded). The developmental profiles of the children in eight domains (social, self-help, gross motor, fine motor, expressive language, language comprehension, letter knowledge and number knowledge--270 items) were compared in relation to the culture medium. The delivery rate was significantly lower in the SSM group than in the Global group (p〈0.05). The culture medium had no significant effect on birthweight, risk of malformation (minor and major), growth and the frequency of medical concerns. However, the children of the Global group were less likely than those of the SSM group to show developmental problems (p = 0.002), irrespective of the different domains. In conclusion, our findings showed that the embryo culture medium may have an impact on further development.
    Subject(s): Fertilization in Vitro ; Culture Media ; Growth ; Humans ; Child, Preschool ; Infant ; Health Status ; Infant, Newborn ; Cohort Studies ; Fertilization in vitro ; Culture media (Biology) ; Embryonic development ; Research ; Child development ; Analysis ; Index Medicus ; Life Sciences ; Human health and pathology ; Gynecology and obstetrics ; Cognitive science ; In vitro fertilization ; Neonates ; Fertilization ; Sperm ; Medical records ; Implantation ; Cardiovascular disease ; Infants ; Gene expression ; Pregnancy ; Embryonic growth stage ; Autism ; Embryogenesis ; Offspring ; Randomization ; Language ; DNA methylation ; Culture media ; Epigenetics ; Birth weight ; Reproductive technologies ; Blood pressure ; Children
    ISSN: 1932-6203
    E-ISSN: 1932-6203
    Source: Academic Search Ultimate
    Source: PubMed Central
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 3
  • 4
    Language: English
    In: Epilepsia (Copenhagen), 2008-06, Vol.49 (6), p.1027-1037
    Description: Summary Mutations in the X‐linked cyclin‐dependent kinase‐like 5 (CDKL5) gene are responsible for a severe encephalopathy with early epilepsy. So far, the electroclinical phenotype remains largely unknown and no clear genotype–phenotype correlations have been established. Purpose: To characterize the epilepsy associated with CDKL5 mutations and to look for a relationship between the genotype and the course of epilepsy. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed the electroclinical phenotypes of 12 patients aged from 2.5 to 19 years diagnosed with pathogenic CDKL5 mutations and one patient with a novel intronic sequence variation of uncertain pathogenicity and examined whether the severity of the epilepsy was linked to the type and location of mutations. Results: The epilepsy course reveals three successive stages: (Stage I) early epilepsy (onset 1–10 weeks) with normal interictal electroencephalogram (EEG) (10/13) despite frequent convulsive seizures; (Stage II) epileptic encephalopathy with infantile spasms (8/8) and hypsarrhythmia (8/8). At the age of evaluation, seven patients were seizure free and six had developed refractory epilepsy (stage III) with tonic seizures and myoclonia (5/6).  Interestingly, the patients carrying a CDKL5 mutations causing a truncation of the catalytic domain tended to develop a more frequent refractory epilepsy than patients with mutations located downstream (4/6, 66.6% versus 1/6, 16%) although, these trends are not yet significant. Discussion: Our data contribute to a better definition of the epileptic phenotype in CDKL5 mutations, and might give some clues to a potential relationship between the phenotype and the genotype in these patients.
    Subject(s): Epileptic encephalopathy ; Infantile spasms ; CDKL5 mutations ; Atypical Rett syndrome ; Neurology ; Pharmacology. Drug treatments ; Headache. Facial pains. Syncopes. Epilepsia. Intracranial hypertension. Brain oedema. Cerebral palsy ; Biological and medical sciences ; Anticonvulsants. Antiepileptics. Antiparkinson agents ; Medical sciences ; Neuropharmacology ; Nervous system (semeiology, syndromes) ; Epilepsy, Generalized - genetics ; Humans ; Child, Preschool ; Infant ; Electroencephalography ; Spasms, Infantile - genetics ; Sex Chromosome Aberrations ; DNA Mutational Analysis ; Epilepsies, Myoclonic - diagnosis ; Epilepsy - genetics ; Retrospective Studies ; Spasms, Infantile - diagnosis ; Child ; Infant, Newborn ; Epilepsies, Myoclonic - genetics ; Chromosomes, Human, X - genetics ; Introns - genetics ; Catalytic Domain - genetics ; Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases - genetics ; Genotype ; Disease Progression ; Epilepsy - diagnosis ; Phenotype ; Adolescent ; Epilepsy, Generalized - diagnosis ; Chronic Disease ; Genetic Carrier Screening ; Care and treatment ; Epilepsy ; Genetic aspects ; Index Medicus ; Neuroscience ; Cognitive science
    ISSN: 0013-9580
    E-ISSN: 1528-1167
    Source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 5
    Language: English
    In: PloS one, 2012, Vol.7 (4), p.e36173-e36173
    Description: Anchorage of muscle cells to the extracellular matrix is crucial for a range of fundamental biological processes including migration, survival and differentiation. Three-dimensional (3D) culture has been proposed to provide a more physiological in vitro model of muscle growth and differentiation than routine 2D cultures. However, muscle cell adhesion and cell-matrix interplay of engineered muscle tissue remain to be determined. We have characterized cell-matrix interactions in 3D muscle culture and analyzed their consequences on cell differentiation. Human myoblasts were embedded in a fibrin matrix cast between two posts, cultured until confluence, and then induced to differentiate. Myoblasts in 3D aligned along the longitudinal axis of the gel. They displayed actin stress fibers evenly distributed around the nucleus and a cortical mesh of thin actin filaments. Adhesion sites in 3D were smaller in size than in rigid 2D culture but expression of adhesion site proteins, including α5 integrin and vinculin, was higher in 3D compared with 2D (p〈0.05). Myoblasts and myotubes in 3D exhibited thicker and ellipsoid nuclei instead of the thin disk-like shape of the nuclei in 2D (p〈0.001). Differentiation kinetics were faster in 3D as demonstrated by higher mRNA concentrations of α-actinin and myosin. More important, the elastic modulus of engineered muscle tissues increased significantly from 3.5 ± 0.8 to 7.4 ± 4.7 kPa during proliferation (p〈0.05) and reached 12.2 ± 6.0 kPa during differentiation (p〈0.05), thus attesting the increase of matrix stiffness during proliferation and differentiation of the myocytes. In conclusion, we reported modulations of the adhesion complexes, the actin cytoskeleton and nuclear shape in 3D compared with routine 2D muscle culture. These findings point to complex interactions between muscle cells and the surrounding matrix with dynamic regulation of the cell-matrix stiffness.
    Subject(s): Actin Cytoskeleton - metabolism ; Cell Proliferation ; Humans ; Extracellular Matrix - metabolism ; Male ; Elastic Modulus ; Cell Adhesion ; Myoblasts - metabolism ; Cell Nucleus Shape ; Myoblasts - cytology ; Muscle Fibers, Skeletal - cytology ; Cell Differentiation ; Fibrin - metabolism ; Child ; Tissue Engineering ; Fibrin ; Actin ; Myosin ; Physiological aspects ; Muscle proteins ; Cell differentiation ; Integrins ; Index Medicus ; Cell culture ; Motility ; Differentiation (biology) ; Two dimensional models ; Genomes ; mRNA ; α-Actinin ; Myocytes ; Nuclei ; Cell adhesion & migration ; Fibers ; Finite element method ; Proteins ; Filaments ; Confluence ; Topography ; Penicillin ; Cell adhesion ; Reaction kinetics ; Fibroblasts ; Extracellular matrix ; Stiffness ; Localization ; Stress concentration ; Myotubes ; Tissue engineering ; Cortex ; Muscles ; Mechanical properties ; Modulus of elasticity ; Gene expression ; Adhesion ; Biological activity ; Myoblasts ; Musculoskeletal system ; Vinculin ; Morphology ; Cytoskeleton ; Kinetics
    ISSN: 1932-6203
    E-ISSN: 1932-6203
    Source: Academic Search Ultimate
    Source: PubMed Central
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 6
    Language: English
    In: Epilepsia (Copenhagen), 2016-07, Vol.57 (7), p.1069-1077
    Description: Summary Objective Attention‐deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is commonly observed in children with epilepsy. However, factors associated with the development of ADHD and which might help to guide its therapeutic management, remain an issue of debate. Methods We conducted a multicenter prospective observational study that included children, aged 6–16 years, with both epilepsy and ADHD according to Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM‐IV) criteria. After inclusion, patients entered a 12–16 week follow‐up period during which they were either treated with methylphenidate or they did not receive specific ADHD treatment. ADHD was evaluated with the ADHD Rating Scale‐IV. Results One hundred sixty‐seven patients were included, of which 91 were seizure‐free during the preinclusion baseline period. At inclusion, the ADHD Rating Scale‐IV total score was 30.4 ± (standard deviation) 9.2, the inattentive subscore was 17.3 ± 4.4, and the hyperactive subscore was 13.2 ± 6.6. We did not detect any difference of ADHD Rating Scale‐IV scores across patients' age or gender, age at epilepsy onset, epilepsy syndrome, seizure frequency, or number of ongoing antiepileptic drugs. Methylphenidate was initiated in 61 patients, including 55 in whom a follow‐up evaluation was available. At the last follow‐up, 41 patients (75%) treated with methylphenidate and 39 (42%) of those who did not received ADHD therapy demonstrated ≥25% decrease of ADHD Rating Scale‐IV total score (p 〈 0.001). Response to methylphenidate was greater in girls but was not influenced by any epilepsy‐related variables. Significance We did not detect any epilepsy‐related factor associated with the severity of ADHD. Twenty‐five percent of patients did not respond to methylphenidate. A better understanding of the pathologic process that underlies ADHD development in childhood epilepsy might be required to improve therapeutic strategies.
    Subject(s): Attention‐deficit/hyperactivity disorder ; Epilepsy ; Methylphenidate ; Severity of Illness Index ; Prospective Studies ; Follow-Up Studies ; Humans ; Male ; Methylphenidate - adverse effects ; Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity - drug therapy ; Epilepsy - complications ; Central Nervous System Stimulants - therapeutic use ; Central Nervous System Stimulants - adverse effects ; Adolescent ; Methylphenidate - therapeutic use ; Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity - complications ; Female ; Child ; Seizures (Medicine) ; Methylphenidate hydrochloride ; Epilepsy in children ; Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder ; Index Medicus ; Life Sciences
    ISSN: 0013-9580
    E-ISSN: 1528-1167
    Source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 7
    Language: English
    In: Epilepsia (Copenhagen), 2008-06, Vol.49 (6), p.1027-1037
    ISSN: 0013-9580
    E-ISSN: 1528-1167
    Source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 8
    Language: French
    In: Presses universitaires de Rennes, 2016-09-16
    Description: Che dire se un giorno le cose naturali fonti, boschi, vigne, campagna saranno assorbite dalla città e dileguate, e s’incontreranno in frasi antiche ? Ci faranno l’effeto dei theoi, delle ninfe, del sacro naturale che emerga in qualche vaso greco. Allora la semplice frase « c’era una fonte » commuoverà. C. PAVESE, Il Mestiere di vivere, M. GUGLIELMINETTI, L. NAY, C. SEGRE (éd.), Einaudi, 2000 [1990], p. 301-302. Que dire, si un jour, les choses naturelles – sources, bois, vignes, campagne – sont absorbées par la ville et escamotées, et se rencontrent dans des phrases anciennes ? Elles nous feront l’effet des theoi, des nymphes, du naturel sacré qui surgit d’un [vase] grec. Alors la simple phrase « il y avait une source » sera émouvante. C. PAVESE, Le métier de vivre, trad. de l’italien par M. ARNAUD, Paris, Gallimard, 1958, p. 357.
    Subject(s): Classics ; Philosophy
    ISBN: 9782753508644
    ISBN: 275350864X
    Source: DOAB: Directory of Open Access Books
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 9
    Language: English
    In: PloS one, 2012-04-27, Vol.7 (4), p.e36173
    Description: Anchorage of muscle cells to the extracellular matrix is crucial for a range of fundamental biological processes including migration, survival and differentiation. Three-dimensional (3D) culture has been proposed to provide a more physiological in vitro model of muscle growth and differentiation than routine 2D cultures. However, muscle cell adhesion and cell-matrix interplay of engineered muscle tissue remain to be determined. We have characterized cell-matrix interactions in 3D muscle culture and analyzed their consequences on cell differentiation. Human myoblasts were embedded in a fibrin matrix cast between two posts, cultured until confluence, and then induced to differentiate. Myoblasts in 3D aligned along the longitudinal axis of the gel. They displayed actin stress fibers evenly distributed around the nucleus and a cortical mesh of thin actin filaments. Adhesion sites in 3D were smaller in size than in rigid 2D culture but expression of adhesion site proteins, including alpha5 integrin and vinculin, was higher in 3D compared with 2D (p,0.05). Myoblasts and myotubes in 3D exhibited thicker and ellipsoid nuclei instead of the thin disk-like shape of the nuclei in 2D (p,0.001). Differentiation kinetics were faster in 3D as demonstrated by higher mRNA concentrations of alpha-actinin and myosin. More important, the elastic modulus of engineered muscle tissues increased significantly from 3.5+/-0.8 to 7.4+/-4.7 kPa during proliferation (p,0.05) and reached 12.2+/-6.0 kPa during differentiation (p,0.05), thus attesting the increase of matrix stiffness during proliferation and differentiation of the myocytes. In conclusion, we reported modulations of the adhesion complexes, the actin cytoskeleton and nuclear shape in 3D compared with routine 2D muscle culture. These findings point to complex interactions between muscle cells and the surrounding matrix with dynamic regulation of the cell-matrix stiffness.
    Subject(s): Life Sciences ; Biological Physics ; Cellular Biology ; Physics ; Cell Behavior
    ISSN: 1932-6203
    E-ISSN: 1932-6203
    Source: Academic Search Ultimate
    Source: PubMed Central
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 10
    Language: English
    In: Orphanet journal of rare diseases, 2012-09-07, Vol.7, p.64-64
    Description: The clinical course of Cystic Fibrosis (CF) is usually measured using the percent predicted FEV(1) and BMI Z-score referenced against a healthy population, since achieving normality is the ultimate goal of CF care. Referencing against age and sex matched CF peers may provide valuable information for patients and for comparison between CF centers or populations. Here, we used a large database of European CF patients to compute CF specific reference equations for FEV(1) and BMI, derived CF-specific percentile charts and compared these European data to their nearest international equivalents. 34859 FEV(1) and 40947 BMI observations were used to compute European CF specific percentiles. Quantile regression was applied to raw measurements as a function of sex, age and height. Results were compared with the North American equivalent for FEV(1) and with the WHO 2007 normative values for BMI. FEV(1) and BMI percentiles illustrated the large variability between CF patients receiving the best current care. The European CF specific percentiles for FEV(1) were significantly different from those in the USA from an earlier era, with higher lung function in Europe. The CF specific percentiles for BMI declined relative to the WHO standard in older children. Lung function and BMI were similar in the two largest contributing European Countries (France and Germany). The CF specific percentile approach applied to FEV(1) and BMI allows referencing patients with respect to their peers. These data allow peer to peer and population comparisons in CF patients.
    Subject(s): Body Mass Index ; Forced Expiratory Volume ; Young Adult ; Cystic Fibrosis - physiopathology ; Europe ; Humans ; Adolescent ; Adult ; Reference Values ; Child ; Index Medicus
    E-ISSN: 1750-1172
    Source: BioMedCentral Open Access
    Source: Academic Search Ultimate
    Source: PubMed Central
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. More information can be found here...