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  • 1
    Article
    Article
    2006
    ISSN: 0036-8075 
    Language: English
    In: Science (American Association for the Advancement of Science), 2006-06-30, Vol.312 (5782), p.1913-1915
    Description: The subjective sense of future time plays an essential role in human motivation. Gradually, time left becomes a better predictor than chronological age for a range of cognitive, emotional, and motivational variables. Socioemotional selectivity theory maintains that constraints on time horizons shift motivational priorities in such a way that the regulation of emotional states becomes more important than other types of goals. This motivational shift occurs with age but also appears in other contexts (for example, geographical relocations, illnesses, and war) that limit subjective future time.
    Subject(s): Adult ; Advertising campaigns ; Age ; Aged ; Aging ; Amygdala ; Amygdala - physiology ; Analysis ; Developmental psychology ; Emotional states ; Emotions ; Forecasting ; Goals ; History ; Human Development ; Human growth ; Humans ; Mental Recall ; Motivation ; Older adults ; Perspectives ; Research ; Sensory perception ; Slogans ; Social psychology ; Time ; Time Perception
    ISSN: 0036-8075
    E-ISSN: 1095-9203
    Source: JSTOR Life Sciences
    Source: Academic Search Ultimate
    Source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
    Source: Get It Now
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  • 2
    Article
    Article
    2003
    ISSN: 0956-7976 
    Language: English
    In: Psychological science, 2003-09-01, Vol.14 (5), p.409-415
    Description: We examined age differences in attention to and memory for faces expressing sadness, anger, and happiness. Participants saw a pair of faces, one emotional and one neutral, and then a dot probe that appeared in the location of one of the faces. In two experiments, older adults responded faster to the dot if it was presented on the same side as a neutral face than if it was presented on the same side as a negative face. Younger adults did not exhibit this attentional bias. Interactions of age and valence were also found for memory for the faces, with older adults remembering positive better than negative faces. These findings reveal that in their initial attention, older adults avoid negative information. This attentional bias is consistent with older adults' generally better emotional well-being and their tendency to remember negative less well than positive information.
    Subject(s): Adaptation, Psychological ; Adolescent ; Adult ; Age ; Aged ; Aged, 80 and over ; Aging ; Aging - psychology ; Attention ; Emotional expression ; Emotions ; Facial Expression ; Facial expressions ; Female ; Happiness ; Humans ; Life span ; Male ; Memory ; Memory encoding ; Mental Recall ; Middle Aged ; Nonverbal communication ; Older adults ; Pattern Recognition, Visual ; Perceptual Defense ; Reaction Time ; Research ; Research Articles ; Standard error ; Wellbeing
    ISSN: 0956-7976
    E-ISSN: 1467-9280
    Source: JSTOR Life Sciences
    Source: International Bibliography of the Social Sciences (IBSS)
    Source: Business Source Ultimate
    Source: Academic Search Ultimate
    Source: SPORTDiscus with Full Text
    Source: Get It Now
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  • 3
    Language: English
    In: Current directions in psychological science : a journal of the American Psychological Society, 2005-06-01, Vol.14 (3), p.117-121
    Description: Divergent trajectories characterize the aging mind: Processing capacity declines, while judgment, knowledge, and emotion regulation are relatively spared. We maintain that these different developmental trajectories have implications for emotion-cognition interactions. Following an overview of our theoretical position, we review empirical studies indicating that (a) older adults evidence superior cognitive performance for emotional relative to non-emotional information, (b) age differences are most evident when the emotional content is positively as opposed to negatively valenced, and (c) differences can be accounted for by changes in motivation posited in socioemotional selectivity theory.
    Subject(s): Age ; Aging ; Cognition ; Cognition & reasoning ; Emotion ; Emotion theories ; Emotional expression ; Emotions ; Memory ; Motivation ; Older adults ; Psychology ; Socioemotional selectivity ; Theory ; Working memory
    ISSN: 0963-7214
    E-ISSN: 1467-8721
    Source: JSTOR Life Sciences
    Source: Academic Search Ultimate
    Source: Get It Now
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  • 4
    Language: English
    In: Journal of marketing research, 2011-01-01, Vol.48 (SPL), p.S23-S37
    Description: Many people fail to save what they will need for retirement. Research on excessive discounting of the future suggests that removing the lure of immediate rewards by precommitting to decisions or elaborating the value of future rewards both can make decisions more future oriented. The authors explore a third and complementary route, one that deals not with present and future rewards but with present and future selves. In line with research that shows that people may fail, because of a lack of belief or imagination, to identify with their future selves, the authors propose that allowing people to interact with age-progressed renderings of themselves will cause them to allocate more resources to the future. In four studies, participants interacted with realistic computer renderings of their future selves using immersive virtual reality hardware and interactive decision aids. In all cases, those who interacted with their virtual future selves exhibited an increased tendency to accept later monetary rewards over immediate ones.
    Subject(s): Age ; Age progression (Forensic science) ; Analytical forecasting ; Consumer behavior ; Discounting ; future self-continuity ; immersive virtual reality ; intertemporal choice ; Marketing ; Methods ; Photographs ; Research ; Retirement ; Retirement income ; Retirement planning ; Retirement saving ; Rewards ; Savings ; Self ; Self-evaluation ; Studies ; Technology application ; temporal discounting ; Usage ; Virtual avatars ; Virtual reality
    ISSN: 0022-2437
    E-ISSN: 1547-7193
    Source: Communication & Mass Media Complete
    Source: Business Source Ultimate
    Source: JSTOR Arts & Sciences VII
    Source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
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  • 5
    Language: English
    In: Psychological science, 2004-03-01, Vol.15 (3), p.208-214
    Description: This study reveals that older adults have a positivity effect in long-term autobiographical memory and that a positivity bias can be induced in younger adults by a heightened motivation to regulate current emotional well-being. Three hundred nuns, ages 47 to 102 years, recalled personal information originally reported 14 years earlier. They did so under experimental conditions that repeatedly primed them to focus on their current emotional states or on their memory accuracy, or that provided no instructional focus (control condition). Both older control participants and participants who were focused on emotional states showed a tendency to remember the past more positively than they originally reported in 1987. In contrast, both younger control participants and participants who were focused on accuracy tended to remember the past more negatively than originally reported.
    Subject(s): Age ; Age Factors ; Aged ; Aged, 80 and over ; Aging ; Autobiographical memory ; Autobiography as Topic ; Bias ; Cognition in old age ; Emotional expression ; Emotional states ; Emotions ; Female ; Hostility ; Humans ; Influence ; Memory ; Middle Aged ; Motivation ; Motivation research ; Older adults ; Older people ; Psychology ; Questionnaires ; Research ; Research Reports ; Surveys and Questionnaires ; Verbal learning ; Wellbeing
    ISSN: 0956-7976
    E-ISSN: 1467-9280
    Source: JSTOR Life Sciences
    Source: International Bibliography of the Social Sciences (IBSS)
    Source: Business Source Ultimate
    Source: Academic Search Ultimate
    Source: SPORTDiscus with Full Text
    Source: Get It Now
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  • 6
    Article
    Article
    2010
    ISSN: 0066-4308 
    Language: English
    In: Annual review of psychology, 2010, Vol.61 (1), p.383-409
    Description: The past several decades have witnessed unidimensional decline models of aging give way to life-span developmental models that consider how specific processes and strategies facilitate adaptive aging. In part, this shift was provoked by the stark contrast between findings that clearly demonstrate decreased biological, physiological, and cognitive capacity and those suggesting that people are generally satisfied in old age and experience relatively high levels of emotional well-being. In recent years, this supposed "paradox" of aging has been reconciled through careful theoretical analysis and empirical investigation. Viewing aging as adaptation sheds light on resilience, well-being, and emotional distress across adulthood.
    Subject(s): Adaptation, Psychological - physiology ; Adult. Elderly ; Age (Psychology) ; Age Factors ; Aged ; Aging ; Aging - psychology ; Analysis ; Biological and medical sciences ; Developmental psychology ; Emotion regulation ; Emotional disorders ; Emotions - physiology ; Fundamental and applied biological sciences. Psychology ; Geriatric psychology ; Humans ; Interpersonal Relations ; Life Expectancy ; Models ; Personal Satisfaction ; Psychological aspects ; Psychology. Psychoanalysis. Psychiatry ; Psychology. Psychophysiology ; Social aspects ; Social Behavior ; Social Environment
    ISSN: 0066-4308
    E-ISSN: 1545-2085
    Source: International Bibliography of the Social Sciences (IBSS)
    Source: Get It Now
    Source: Electronic Back Volume Collection (EBVC)
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  • 7
    Language: English
    In: Psychological science, 2008-04-01, Vol.19 (4), p.320-323
    Description: The anterior insula has been implicated in both the experience and the anticipation of negative outcomes. Although individual differences in insular sensitivity have been associated with self-report measures of chronic anxiety, previous research has not examined whether individual differences in insular sensitivity predict learning to avoid aversive stimuli. In the present study, insular sensitivity was assessed as participants anticipated monetary losses while undergoing functional magnetic resonance imaging. We found that insular responsiveness to anticipated losses predicted participants' ability to learn to avoid losses (but not to approach gains) in a behavioral test several months later. These findings suggest that in addition to correlating with self- reported anxiety, heightened insular sensitivity may promote learning to avoid loss.
    Subject(s): Adult ; Affect ; Age ; Age Factors ; Aged ; Aged, 80 and over ; Anticipation ; Anxieties ; Anxiety ; Anxiety disorders ; Aversive ; Avoidance ; Avoidance Learning ; Brain research ; Cerebral Cortex - physiology ; Correlations ; Expectations ; Female ; Functional magnetic resonance imaging ; Humans ; Individual differences ; Learning ; Learning experiences ; Magnetic resonance imaging ; Male ; Older adults ; Phobias ; Research Reports ; Responsiveness ; Selfreport ; Sensitivity
    ISSN: 0956-7976
    E-ISSN: 1467-9280
    Source: JSTOR Life Sciences
    Source: International Bibliography of the Social Sciences (IBSS)
    Source: Business Source Ultimate
    Source: Academic Search Ultimate
    Source: SPORTDiscus with Full Text
    Source: Get It Now
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  • 8
    Language: English
    In: Cognition and emotion, 2019-01-01, Vol.33 (1), p.119-125
    Description: Thirty years ago, the subfields of emotion and cognition operated relatively independently and the associated science reflected the tacit view that they were distinct constructs. Today, questions about the integration of cognition and emotion are among the most interesting questions in the field. I offer a personal view of the key changes that fuelled this shift over time and describe research from my group that unfolded in parallel and led to the identification of the positivity effect.
    Subject(s): Aging ; Aging - psychology ; Cognition ; Emotions ; history psychology ; Humans ; positivity effect ; Psychology ; Psychology, Experimental ; Research ; Social Sciences ; socioemotional selectivity theory
    ISSN: 0269-9931
    E-ISSN: 1464-0600
    Source: Business Source Ultimate
    Source: Academic Search Ultimate
    Source: Web of Science - Social Sciences Citation Index – 2019〈img src="http://exlibris-pub.s3.amazonaws.com/fromwos-v2.jpg" /〉
    Source: Get It Now
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  • 9
    Article
    Article
    2012
    ISSN: 1664-1078 
    Language: English
    In: Frontiers in psychology, 2012, Vol.3, p.339-339
    Description: The "positivity effect" refers to an age-related trend that favors positive over negative stimuli in cognitive processing. Relative to their younger counterparts, older people attend to and remember more positive than negative information. Since the effect was initially identified and the conceptual basis articulated (Mather and Carstensen, 2005) scores of independent replications and related findings have appeared in the literature. Over the same period, a number of investigations have failed to observe age differences in the cognitive processing of emotional material. When findings are considered in theoretical context, a reliable pattern of evidence emerges that helps to refine conceptual tenets. In this article we articulate the operational definition and theoretical foundations of the positivity effect and review the empirical evidence based on studies of visual attention, memory, decision making, and neural activation. We conclude with a discussion of future research directions with emphasis on the conditions where a focus on positive information may benefit and/or impair cognitive performance in older people.
    Subject(s): Aging ; Attention ; Emotion Regulation ; Memory ; Motivation ; positivity effect ; Psychology
    ISSN: 1664-1078
    E-ISSN: 1664-1078
    Source: PubMed Central
    Source: DOAJ Directory of Open Access Journals - Not for CDI Discovery
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  • 10
    Article
    Article
    2009
    ISSN: 1079-5014 
    Language: English
    In: The journals of gerontology. Series B, Psychological sciences and social sciences, 2009-01-06, Vol.65B (2), p.135-144
    Description: Contrasting cognitive and physical decline, research in emotional aging suggests that most older adults enjoy high levels of affective well-being and emotional stability into their 70s and 80s. We investigate the contributions of age-related changes in emotional motivation and competence to positive affect trajectories. We give an overview on the recent literature on emotional processing and emotional regulation, combining evidence from correlational and experimental, as well as behavioral and neuroscience studies. In particular, we focus on emotion–cognition interactions, including the positivity effect. Looking forward, we argue that efforts to link levels of emotional functioning with long-term outcomes, combining space- and time-sensitive measures of brain function, and developing interventions to improve life quality for older adults may further refine life-span theories and open promising avenues of empirical investigation.
    Subject(s): Abridged Index Medicus ; Adult. Elderly ; Affect - physiology ; Age Factors ; Aged ; Aged, 80 and over ; Aging ; Aging - physiology ; Aging - psychology ; Analysis ; Biological and medical sciences ; Cognition ; Cognition Disorders - epidemiology ; Developmental psychology ; Emotion ; emotion regulation ; Emotion/emotion regulation ; Emotions ; Empirical Research ; Fundamental and applied biological sciences. Psychology ; Human Development ; Humans ; Journal of Gerontology ; Life course and developmental change ; Motivation ; Physiological aspects ; Psychological aspects ; Psychological Sciences ; Psychology. Psychoanalysis. Psychiatry ; Psychology. Psychophysiology ; Self-regulation ; Successful aging ; Time Factors ; Well-being
    ISSN: 1079-5014
    E-ISSN: 1758-5368
    Source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
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