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  • 1
    Language: English
    In: TechTrends, 2011-02-06, Vol.55 (2), p.31-38
    Description: Understanding the covert events surrounding the undergraduate students’ experience is essential to educators’ and counselors’ involvement in their success. Research into bullying behaviors has documented victims’ feelings of anger, sadness and poor concentration. Affordable technologies have propagated this concern into cyberspace. This exploratory study evaluated the instances of cyberbullying experienced by undergraduate students. Additionally, the forms of technology utilized in cyberbullying were queried. A 27-item survey was distributed to 120 undergraduate students in social science, technology and education departments. The majority of all respondents (54%) and 100% of male respondents indicated they knew someone who had been cyberbullied. The perpetrators primarily used cell phones, Facebook and instant messaging. The study results provide legitimate concerns regarding the undergraduate students’ exposure to cyberbullying and numerous areas for future research.
    Subject(s): Article ; Bullying ; College students ; Cyberbullying ; Education ; Educational Technology ; Instant messaging ; Internet ; Learning and Instruction ; Studies ; Universities and colleges ; University students
    ISSN: 8756-3894
    E-ISSN: 1559-7075
    Source: Academic Search Ultimate
    Source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
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  • 2
    Language: English
    In: Cell, 2014-08-28, Vol.158 (5), p.1159-1172
    Description: In Alzheimer’s disease (AD) brain, exposure of axons to Aβ causes pathogenic changes that spread retrogradely by unknown mechanisms, affecting the entire neuron. We found that locally applied Aβ1-42 initiates axonal synthesis of a defined set of proteins including the transcription factor ATF4. Inhibition of local translation and retrograde transport or knockdown of axonal Atf4 mRNA abolished Aβ-induced ATF4 transcriptional activity and cell loss. Aβ1-42 injection into the dentate gyrus (DG) of mice caused loss of forebrain neurons whose axons project to the DG. Protein synthesis and Atf4 mRNA were upregulated in these axons, and coinjection of Atf4 siRNA into the DG reduced the effects of Aβ1-42 in the forebrain. ATF4 protein and transcripts were found with greater frequency in axons in the brain of AD patients. These results reveal an active role for intra-axonal translation in neurodegeneration and identify ATF4 as a mediator for the spread of AD pathology. [Display omitted] •Locally applied Aβ1-42 triggers recruitment of mRNAs into axons and local translation•ATF4 is locally synthesized and retrogradely transported in response to Aβ1-42•Knockdown of axonal Atf4 mRNA reduces Aβ1-42-induced neurodegeneration in vivo•ATF4 transcript and protein levels are increased in axons in the brain of AD patients Axonal exposure to β-amyloid elicits the local synthesis of the transcription factor ATF, which is retrogradely transported to the neuron cell bodies where it triggers a transcriptional response leading to cell death.
    Subject(s): Activating Transcription Factor 4 - analysis ; Activating Transcription Factor 4 - metabolism ; Alzheimer Disease - pathology ; Alzheimer's disease ; Amyloid beta-Peptides - genetics ; Animals ; Axons - metabolism ; Brain ; Brain - cytology ; Brain - pathology ; Brain Chemistry ; Cells ; Eukaryotic Initiation Factor-2 - metabolism ; Hippocampus ; Humans ; Mice, Inbred C57BL ; Neurons ; Protein biosynthesis ; Proteins ; Rats ; RNA ; Transcription Factor CHOP - metabolism
    ISSN: 0092-8674
    E-ISSN: 1097-4172
    Source: Backfile Package - All of Back Files EBS [ALLOFBCKF]
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  • 3
    Language: English
    In: Health & social care in the community, 1995-07, Vol.3 (4), p.249-260
    Description: It is more than a decade since the government announced that Regional Health Authorities (RHAs) should close their long‐stay mental handicap hospitals. The North West Regional Health Authority's (NWRHA) commitment to the resettlement of people with learning difficulties into ordinary housing in the community pre‐dated the government's cost‐driven initiative. In 1982 the Region published A Model District Service, a strategy document supported by both the District Health Authorities (DHAs) and the local social services departments, in which it set out a user‐centred philosophy for community services for people with learning difficulties. This paper is based on an evaluation of the impact of that strategy, the central part of which was an examination of the experiences of 102 people who moved out of three large mental handicap hospitals between March 1990 and March 1991. The research team's primary concern was to obtain information from the people with learning difficulties who had moved into the community. Unstructured interviews were conducted with those with an adequate level of communication, photographs were used to assist those with very limited communication; Observations were made over a period of time of those without any communication skills at all. Interviews were also conducted with the formal care worker in the community and, where there was one, a relative who had meaningful contact with their learning disabled relative. The research found that the move into the community offered the people concerned a much improved quality of life, with greater independence and choice in everyday living. However, there is a need to build on this so that people's life experiences are not merely better than those offered by the already discredited institutions, but so that they can become fully integrated and respected members of society.
    Subject(s): community care ; Deinstitutionalization ; learning difficulty ; Learning disabled people ; North West England ; quality of life ; resettlement
    ISSN: 0966-0410
    E-ISSN: 1365-2524
    Source: Wiley Online Library All Backfiles
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  • 4
    Language: English
    In: Applied and Environmental Microbiology, 2005-07-01, Vol.71 (7), p.3692-3700
    Description: Classifications Services AEM Citing Articles Google Scholar PubMed Related Content Social Bookmarking CiteULike Delicious Digg Facebook Google+ Mendeley Reddit StumbleUpon Twitter current issue Spotlights in the Current Issue AEM About AEM Subscribers Authors Reviewers Advertisers Inquiries from the Press Permissions & Commercial Reprints ASM Journals Public Access Policy AEM RSS Feeds 1752 N Street N.W. • Washington DC 20036 202.737.3600 • 202.942.9355 fax • journals@asmusa.org Print ISSN: 0099-2240 Online ISSN: 1098-5336 Copyright © 2014 by the American Society for Microbiology.   For an alternate route to AEM .asm.org, visit: AEM       
    Subject(s): Anaerobiosis ; Bacteria ; Bacteria, Anaerobic - classification ; Bacteria, Anaerobic - genetics ; Bacteria, Anaerobic - growth & development ; Bacteriology ; Bacteroides ; Bacteroides - classification ; Bacteroides - genetics ; Bacteroides - growth & development ; Biological and medical sciences ; Colon ; Colon - microbiology ; Culture Media ; DNA Probes ; Ecosystem ; Eubacteria ; Fatty acids ; Fatty Acids - metabolism ; Fermentation ; Fundamental and applied biological sciences. Psychology ; Humans ; Hydrogen-Ion Concentration ; In Situ Hybridization, Fluorescence ; Microbial Ecology ; Microbiology ; Pathogenicity, virulence, toxins, bacteriocins, pyrogens, host-bacteria relations, miscellaneous strains ; Peptides ; Peptides - metabolism ; RNA, Ribosomal, 16S - genetics ; Temperature
    ISSN: 0099-2240
    E-ISSN: 1098-5336
    Source: HighWire Press (Free Journals)
    Source: Hellenic Academic Libraries Link
    Source: PubMed Central
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  • 5
    Language: English
    In: Arthritis care & research (2010), 2018-07, Vol.70 (7), p.970-978
    Description: Objective We estimated the incidence and prevalence of depression, anxiety disorder, bipolar disorder, and schizophrenia in a population‐based cohort with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) as compared to an age‐, sex‐, and geographically matched cohort without RA. Methods Using population‐based administrative health data from Manitoba, Canada, we identified persons with incident RA between 1989 and 2012, and a cohort from the general population matched 5:1 on year of birth, sex, and region of residence. We applied validated algorithms for depression, anxiety disorder, bipolar disorder, and schizophrenia to determine the annual incidence of these conditions after the diagnosis of RA, and their lifetime and annual period prevalence. We compared findings between cohorts using negative binomial regression models. Results We identified 10,206 incident cases of RA and 50,960 matched individuals. After adjustment for age, sex, socioeconomic status, region of residence, number of physician visits, and year, the incidence of depression was higher in the RA cohort over the study period (incidence rate ratio [IRR] 1.46 [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.35–1.58]), as was the incidence of anxiety disorder (IRR 1.24 [95% CI 1.15–1.34]) and bipolar disorder (IRR 1.21 [95% CI 1.00–1.47]). The incidence of schizophrenia did not differ between groups (IRR 0.96 [95% CI 0.61–1.50]). Incidence rates of psychiatric disorders declined minimally over time. The lifetime and annual period prevalence of depression and anxiety disorder were also higher in the RA than in the matched cohort over the study period. Conclusion The incidence and prevalence of depression, anxiety disorder, and bipolar disorder are elevated in the RA population as compared to a matched population.
    Subject(s): Anxieties ; Anxiety ; Behavior disorders ; Bipolar disorder ; Mental disorders ; Original ; Population ; Regression analysis ; Rheumatoid Arthritis ; Schizophrenia ; Sex
    ISSN: 2151-464X
    E-ISSN: 2151-4658
    Source: Hellenic Academic Libraries Link
    Source: Wiley Online Library Science, Technology and Medicine Collection 2018
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  • 6
    Language: English
    In: Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, 2012-01-01, Vol.56 (1), p.208-217
    Description: OA  Classifications Services AAC Citing Articles Google Scholar PubMed Related Content Social Bookmarking CiteULike Delicious Digg Facebook Google+ Mendeley Reddit StumbleUpon Twitter current issue AAC About AAC Subscribers Authors Reviewers Advertisers Inquiries from the Press Permissions & Commercial Reprints ASM Journals Public Access Policy AAC RSS Feeds 1752 N Street N.W. • Washington DC 20036 202.737.3600 • 202.942.9355 fax • journals@asmusa.org Print ISSN: 0066-4804 Online ISSN: 1098-6596 Copyright © 2014 by the American Society for Microbiology.   For an alternate route to AAC .asm.org, visit: AAC       
    Subject(s): Amino Acid Substitution ; Animals ; Antibiotics. Antiinfectious agents. Antiparasitic agents ; Antifungal Agents - administration & dosage ; Biological and medical sciences ; Candida albicans ; Candida albicans - drug effects ; Candida albicans - genetics ; Candida albicans - pathogenicity ; Candida albicans - ultrastructure ; Candidiasis ; Candidiasis - drug therapy ; Candidiasis - microbiology ; Candidiasis - mortality ; Candidiasis - pathology ; Cell Wall ; Cell Wall - chemistry ; Cell Wall - ultrastructure ; Chitin ; Chitin - genetics ; DNA Mutational Analysis ; Drug Resistance, Fungal ; Echinocandins ; Echinocandins - administration & dosage ; Experimental Therapeutics ; Female ; Fungal Proteins ; Fungal Proteins - genetics ; Glucosyltransferases ; Glucosyltransferases - genetics ; Kidney ; Kidney - drug effects ; Kidney - microbiology ; Kidney - pathology ; Lipopeptides ; Medical sciences ; Mice ; Mice, Inbred BALB C ; Microbial Sensitivity Tests ; Microscopy, Fluorescence ; Mutation ; Pharmacology. Drug treatments ; Survival Rate
    ISSN: 0066-4804
    E-ISSN: 1098-6596
    Source: HighWire Press (Free Journals)
    Source: Hellenic Academic Libraries Link
    Source: PubMed Central
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  • 7
    Language: English
    In: PloS one, 2016, Vol.11 (9), p.e0162342-e0162342
    Description: Bat guano is a relatively untapped reservoir of information, having great utility as a DNA source because it is often available at roosts even when bats are not and is an easy type of sample to collect from a difficult-to-study mammalian order. Recent advances from microbial community studies in primer design, sequencing, and analysis enable fast, accurate, and cost-effective species identification. Here, we borrow from this discipline to develop an order-wide DNA mini-barcode assay (Species from Feces) based on a segment of the mitochondrial gene cytochrome c oxidase I (COI). The assay works effectively with fecal DNA and is conveniently transferable to low-cost, high-throughput Illumina MiSeq technology that also allows simultaneous pairing with other markers. Our PCR primers target a region of COI that is highly discriminatory among Chiroptera (92% species-level identification of barcoded species), and are sufficiently degenerate to allow hybridization across diverse bat taxa. We successfully validated our system with 54 bat species across both suborders. Despite abundant arthropod prey DNA in guano, our primers were highly specific to bats; no arthropod DNA was detected in thousands of feces run on Sanger and Illumina platforms. The assay is extendable to fecal pellets of unknown age as well as individual and pooled guano, to allow for individual (using singular fecal pellets) and community (using combined pellets collected from across long-term roost sites) analyses. We developed a searchable database (http://nau.edu/CEFNS/Forestry/Research/Bats/Search-Tool/) that allows users to determine the discriminatory capability of our markers for bat species of interest. Our assay has applications worldwide for examining disease impacts on vulnerable species, determining species assemblages within roosts, and assessing the presence of bat species that are vulnerable or facing extinction. The development and analytical pathways are rapid, reliable, and inexpensive, and can be applied to ecology and conservation studies of other taxa.
    Subject(s): Abandoned mines ; Animal behavior ; Arthropoda ; Assaying ; Bar codes ; Bats ; Biology and Life Sciences ; Chiroptera ; Communities ; Computer and Information Sciences ; Conservation ; Cost analysis ; Cytochrome ; Cytochrome-c oxidase ; Deoxyribonucleic acid ; Disease susceptibility ; DNA ; Dung ; Ecological monitoring ; Ecology ; Ecosystem biology ; Ecosystems ; Feces ; Forestry ; Forestry research ; Genes ; Genetics ; Genomics ; Guano ; Hybridization ; Identification ; Laboratories ; Markers ; Microorganisms ; Mitochondria ; Morphology ; Oxidases ; Pellets ; Prey ; Primers ; Research and Analysis Methods ; Roosts ; Sequences ; Species extinction ; Taxa ; Taxonomy ; Threatened species
    ISSN: 1932-6203
    E-ISSN: 1932-6203
    Source: Academic Search Ultimate
    Source: PubMed Central
    Source: DOAJ Directory of Open Access Journals - Not for CDI Discovery
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  • 8
    Language: English
    In: Inflammatory bowel diseases, 2019-01-10, Vol.25 (2), p.360-368
    Description: Abstract Background Psychiatric comorbidity in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is well known; however, data from a truly representative sample are sparse. We aimed to estimate the incidence and prevalence of psychiatric disorders in an IBD cohort compared with a matched cohort without IBD. Methods Using population-based administrative health data from Manitoba, Canada, we identified all persons with incident IBD from 1989 to 2012 and a general population matched cohort (5:1). We applied validated algorithms for IBD, depression, anxiety disorders, bipolar disorder, and schizophrenia to determine the annual incidence of these conditions post-IBD diagnosis and their lifetime and current prevalence. Results There were 6119 incident cases of IBD and 30,573 matched individuals. After adjustment for age, sex, socioeconomic status, region of residence, and year, there was a higher incidence in the IBD cohort compared with controls for depression (incidence rate ratio [IRR], 1.58; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.41-1.76), anxiety disorder (IRR, 1.39; 95% CI, 1.26-1.53), bipolar disorder (IRR, 1.82; 95% CI, 1.44-2.30), and schizophrenia (IRR, 1.64; 95% CI, 0.95-2.84). Incidence rate ratios were similar for Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis between males and females and were stable over time. However, within the IBD cohort, the incidence rates of depression, anxiety, and bipolar disorders were higher among females, those aged 18-24 years vs those older than 44 years, urbanites, and those of lower socioeconomic status. The lifetime and current prevalence rates of psychiatric disorders were also higher in the IBD than the matched cohort. Conclusions The incidence and prevalence of psychiatric disorders are elevated in the IBD population.
    Subject(s): Adolescent ; Adult ; Aged ; Canada - epidemiology ; Case-Control Studies ; chronic immunoinflammatory disease ; Comorbidity ; Female ; Follow-Up Studies ; Gastroenterology & Hepatology ; Humans ; Incidence ; inflammatory bowel disease ; Inflammatory Bowel Diseases - physiopathology ; Life Sciences & Biomedicine ; Male ; Mental Disorders - diagnosis ; Mental Disorders - epidemiology ; Mental Disorders - psychology ; mental health ; Middle Aged ; Original Clinical ; population based ; Prevalence ; Prognosis ; psychiatric disorders ; Retrospective Studies ; Science & Technology ; Young Adult
    ISSN: 1078-0998
    E-ISSN: 1536-4844
    Source: Hellenic Academic Libraries Link
    Source: Web of Science - Science Citation Index Expanded - 2019〈img src="http://exlibris-pub.s3.amazonaws.com/fromwos-v2.jpg" /〉
    Source: Web of Science - Social Sciences Citation Index – 2019〈img src="http://exlibris-pub.s3.amazonaws.com/fromwos-v2.jpg" /〉
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  • 9
    Language: English
    In: Proteomics (Weinheim), 2012-11, Vol.12 (21), p.3164-3179
    Description: The major fungal pathogen Candida albicans can occupy diverse microenvironments in its human host. During colonization of the gastrointestinal or urogenital tracts, mucosal surfaces, bloodstream, and internal organs, C. albicans thrives in niches that differ with respect to available nutrients and local environmental stresses. Although most studies are performed on glucose-grown cells, changes in carbon source dramatically affect cell wall architecture, stress responses, and drug resistance. We show that growth on the physiologically relevant carboxylic acid, lactate, has a significant impact on the C. albicans cell wall proteome and secretome. The regulation of cell wall structural proteins (e.g. Cht1, Phr1, Phr2, Pir1) correlated with extensive cell wall remodeling in lactate-grown cells and with their increased resistance to stresses and antifungal drugs, compared with glucose-grown cells. Moreover, changes in other proteins (e.g. Als2, Gca1, Phr1, Sap9) correlated with the increased adherence and biofilm formation of lactate-grown cells. We identified mating and pheromone-regulated proteins that were exclusive to lactate-grown cells (e.g. Op4, Pga31, Pry1, Scw4, Yps7) as well as mucosa-specific and other niche-specific factors such as Lip4, Pga4, Plb5, and Sap7. The analysis of the corresponding null mutants confirmed that many of these proteins contribute to C. albicans adherence, stress, and antifungal drug resistance. Therefore, the cell wall proteome and secretome display considerable plasticity in response to carbon source. This plasticity influences important fitness and virulence attributes known to modulate the behavior of C. albicans in different host microenvironments during infection.
    Subject(s): Analysis ; Analytical, structural and metabolic biochemistry ; Antifungal agents ; Antifungal Agents - pharmacology ; Antifungals ; Bacteriology ; Biofilms ; Biological and medical sciences ; Candida albicans ; Candida albicans - drug effects ; Candida albicans - metabolism ; Candida albicans - physiology ; Carbon ; Cell Adhesion - drug effects ; Cell Wall - chemistry ; Cell Wall - metabolism ; Cell Wall - ultrastructure ; Cell wall proteome ; Drug resistance ; Drug resistance in microorganisms ; Drug Resistance, Fungal ; Drug therapy ; Fundamental and applied biological sciences. Psychology ; Fungal Proteins - metabolism ; Glucose - metabolism ; Glucose - pharmacology ; Lactates ; Lactic Acid - metabolism ; Lactic Acid - pharmacology ; Microbial Sensitivity Tests ; Microbiology ; Miscellaneous ; Osmotic Pressure ; Phenotype ; Proteins ; Proteome - drug effects ; Proteome - metabolism ; Secretome ; Stress resistance ; Stress, Physiological
    ISSN: 1615-9853
    E-ISSN: 1615-9861
    Source: Hellenic Academic Libraries Link
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  • 10
    Language: English
    In: PloS one, 2018, Vol.13 (6), p.e0198975-e0198975
    Description: Impairment in work function is a frequent outcome in patients with chronic conditions such as immune-mediated inflammatory diseases (IMID), depression and anxiety disorders. The personal and economic costs of work impairment in these disorders are immense. Symptoms of pain, fatigue, depression and anxiety are potentially remediable forms of distress that may contribute to work impairment in chronic health conditions such as IMID. The present study evaluated the association between pain [Medical Outcomes Study Pain Effects Scale], fatigue [Daily Fatigue Impact Scale], depression and anxiety [Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale] and work impairment [Work Productivity and Activity Impairment Scale] in four patient populations: multiple sclerosis (n = 255), inflammatory bowel disease (n = 248, rheumatoid arthritis (n = 154) and a depression and anxiety group (n = 307), using quantile regression, controlling for the effects of sociodemographic factors, physical disability, and cognitive deficits. Each of pain, depression symptoms, anxiety symptoms, and fatigue individually showed significant associations with work absenteeism, presenteeism, and general activity impairment (quantile regression standardized estimates ranging from 0.3 to 1.0). When the distress variables were entered concurrently into the regression models, fatigue was a significant predictor of work and activity impairment in all models (quantile regression standardized estimates ranging from 0.2 to 0.5). These findings have important clinical implications for understanding the determinants of work impairment and for improving work-related outcomes in chronic disease.
    Subject(s): Absenteeism ; Adult ; Analysis ; Anxieties ; Anxiety ; Anxiety - physiopathology ; Arthritis ; Biology and Life Sciences ; Chronic conditions ; Chronic Disease ; Chronic illnesses ; Cognitive ability ; Comorbidity ; Depression - physiopathology ; Depression, Mental ; Disorders ; Economic impact ; Fatigue ; Fatigue - physiopathology ; Female ; Humans ; Immune System Diseases - physiopathology ; Immunologic diseases ; Impairment ; Inflammation - physiopathology ; Inflammatory bowel disease ; Inflammatory bowel diseases ; Inflammatory diseases ; Intestine ; Male ; Medicine and Health Sciences ; Mental depression ; Middle Aged ; Multiple sclerosis ; Pain ; Pain - physiopathology ; Physical Sciences ; Regression analysis ; Regression models ; Research ; Rheumatoid arthritis ; Social Sciences ; Systematic review ; Work
    ISSN: 1932-6203
    E-ISSN: 1932-6203
    Source: Academic Search Ultimate
    Source: PubMed Central
    Source: DOAJ Directory of Open Access Journals - Not for CDI Discovery
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