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  • 1
    Language: English
    In: Journal of European social policy, 2011-12, Vol.21 (5), p.432-449
    Description: After the European Year for Combating Poverty and Social Exclusion, on the eve of the elaboration of policies designed to help reach the Europe 2020 target of lifting 20 million people out of poverty, it is important to take stock of the outcomes of the Lisbon agenda for growth, employment and social inclusion. The question arises why, despite growth of average incomes and of employment, poverty rates have not gone down, but have either stagnated or even increased. In this paper we identify the following trends: rising employment has benefited workless households only partially; income protection for the working-age population out of work has become less adequate; social policies and, more generally, social redistribution have become less pro-poor. These observations are indicative of the ambivalence of the Lisbon Strategy and its underlying investment paradigm.
    Subject(s): Ambivalence ; Economic growth ; Elaboration ; Employment ; Households ; Housework ; Investments ; Lifting ; Low income groups ; Population policy ; Poverty ; Protection ; Redistribution ; Social exclusion ; Social integration ; Social policy ; Social security
    ISSN: 0958-9287
    E-ISSN: 1461-7269
    Source: International Bibliography of the Social Sciences (IBSS)
    Source: Hellenic Academic Libraries Link
    Source: Sociological Abstracts
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  • 2
    Language: English
    In: Social policy & administration, 2021-07, Vol.55 (4), p.622-636
    Description: Although the ‘Fund for European Aid to the Most Deprived’ (FEAD) is a peripheral financing instrument with respect to European cohesion policy, it is a concrete case of a redistributive and highly targeted European anti‐poverty programme. In this sense, it is a unique supranational instrument providing social protection to European citizens, playing on the necessity of food aid in most European Union (EU) countries. With this in mind, we shed light on the Fund's budgetary scope in relation to national welfare state efforts. Also, we argue that there is some indication that FEAD could potentially contribute to shifting responsibilities from the national to the European level. For a better understanding of this phenomenon, we draw parallels to the case of the United States' Supplement Nutrition Assistance Program. We conclude that FEAD bears resemblance to a contemporary ‘Trojan horse’: it is welcomed by the Member States as a deceptively innocent EU gift but it might in the long run support the role of the EU as an agent that plugs gaps within national social protection schemes.
    Subject(s): Antipoverty programs ; Assistance ; Deprivation ; FEAD ; Food ; food aid ; food bank ; Gift giving ; Intervention ; Necessity ; Nutrition ; Poverty ; Protection ; SNAP ; Social protection ; Spyware ; welfare policy ; Welfare state
    ISSN: 0144-5596
    E-ISSN: 1467-9515
    Source: International Bibliography of the Social Sciences (IBSS)
    Source: Hellenic Academic Libraries Link
    Source: Sociological Abstracts
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  • 3
    Language: English
    In: Journal of European social policy, 2020-05, Vol.30 (2), p.129-143
    Description: This article investigates whether declining or sluggish growth in earnings for low-wage workers contributes to declining levels of minimum income protections. Starting from the observation of lacklustre growth in minimum income protections, this article introduces a framework to conceptualize the tensions facing modern welfare states in their attempt to (1) provide poverty-alleviating minimum incomes, (2) achieve employment growth and (3) keep spending levels in check. We argue that, due to downward pressure on low gross wages compared to median household incomes, it has become more difficult to balance each of those three objectives. Estimation results from country-year panel data suggest that declines in minimum wages (or low gross wages) are associated with declines in minimum income protections for the jobless. When growth in minimum income protections does exceed growth in low gross wages, we find that welfare states also increase gross-to-net effort to subsidize the net income of low-wage earners. We argue that these findings point towards a ‘structural inadequacy’ around minimum income protections for the jobless.
    Subject(s): Earnings ; Employment ; Estimation ; Expenditures ; Low income groups ; Minimum wage ; Panel data ; Poverty ; Wages & salaries ; Welfare
    ISSN: 0958-9287
    E-ISSN: 1461-7269
    Source: International Bibliography of the Social Sciences (IBSS)
    Source: Hellenic Academic Libraries Link
    Source: Sociological Abstracts
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  • 4
    Language: English
    In: Social policy & administration, 2021-03, Vol.55 (2), p.249-260
    Description: How have welfare states responded to the coronavirus pandemic? In this introductory article, we provide a synopsis of papers that comprise this special issue on social policy responses to COVID‐19, an overview of some of the key questions they raise, and some provisional answers to these questions. Our conclusions are threefold: first, these social policy responses, while entailing new developments in many countries, nonetheless reflect, at least in part, existing national policy legacies. Second, these responses can be understood as a form of “emergency Keynesianism,” which is characterized by the massive use of deficit spending during economic crises, with the aim of to supporting rather than challenging core capitalist institutions. Third, there are clear differences in terms of the nature of the reforms enacted during the initial phase of the COVID‐19 crisis as compared to reforms enacted as a response to the 2008 financial crisis.
    Subject(s): Capitalism ; COVID-19 ; crisis ; Economic crisis ; Expenditures ; Keynesian theory ; pandemic ; Pandemics ; policy responses ; Public debt ; Reforms ; Social policy ; Social response ; Welfare ; welfare state
    ISSN: 0144-5596
    E-ISSN: 1467-9515
    Source: International Bibliography of the Social Sciences (IBSS)
    Source: Hellenic Academic Libraries Link
    Source: Sociological Abstracts
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  • 5
    Language: English
    In: Social policy & administration, 2021-03, Vol.55 (2), p.326-338
    Description: Social protection in Germany, Belgium and the Netherlands share Bismarckian roots. Over time, these welfare states were however in constant flux and incorporated to a greater or lesser extend elements of both the Anglo‐Saxon and Nordic models. While the Netherlands has from the beginning deviated from the Bismarckian model, in recent years this welfare state has undergone important reforms that have made it increasingly evolve into a “Bismarck cum Beveridge” model. Germany and Belgium also witnessed a dual transformation, with retrenched earnings‐related benefits for long‐term unemployed and an increasing number of atypically employed people on the one hand and expanded social security to the so‐called “new social risks” on the other. It is against this changing institutional background that we can understand the similarities and differences in the extent to which these three continental welfare states used traditional social insurance systems to buffer the social and economic consequences of confinement. First, all three countries strengthened to varying degrees social protection systems for the active age population. So conceived, the policy responses were a response to the dual transformation of social protection that took place in recent decades without, however, changing its course. Second, the extent to which continental welfare states made use of existing social insurance schemes seems to be related to the extent to which these welfare states have moved in the Anglo‐Saxon direction.
    Subject(s): Belgium ; coronavirus ; COVID-19 ; Earnings ; European Union ; Germany ; income transfers ; Models ; Netherlands ; Population policy ; Protection ; public policy ; Social insurance ; Social protection ; Social security ; Social systems ; Transformation ; Unemployed people ; Welfare policy ; Welfare reform ; Welfare state
    ISSN: 0144-5596
    E-ISSN: 1467-9515
    Source: International Bibliography of the Social Sciences (IBSS)
    Source: Hellenic Academic Libraries Link
    Source: Sociological Abstracts
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  • 6
    Article
    Article
    2013
    ISSN: 1474-7464  ISSN: 1475-3073 
    Language: English
    In: Social policy and society : a journal of the Social Policy Association, 2013-10, Vol.12 (4), p.553-564
    Description: In this article we critically assess the social investment perspective that has become the dominant paradigm in European social policymaking. We identify and discuss some of its shortcomings that may hamper social progress for all. In doing so, we focus on three pillars central to the idea of social investment: social inclusion through work, individual responsibility and human capital investment. We find that the social investment perspective has some serious flaws when it comes to the social protection of vulnerable groups. This is strongly related to the continuing relevance of social class in explaining and remedying social inequalities. We conclude that investment cannot be the only rationale for welfare state intervention and that protecting people should remain equally high on the policy agenda.
    Subject(s): Aktivierende Methode ; Behinderter ; Benachteiligung ; Beruf ; Berufliche Integration ; Bildung ; Europa ; Europäische Union ; Familie ; Investition ; Kinderbetreuung ; Paradigma ; Pflegerischer Beruf ; Policy making ; Schulverweigerung ; Selbstverantwortung ; Social capital ; Social policy ; Soziale Integration ; Soziale Ungleichheit ; Sozialinvestition ; Sozialpolitik ; Themed Section on ‘New’ Welfare in Practice: Trends, Challenges and Dilemmas ; Transformation ; Wohlfahrtsstaat
    ISSN: 1474-7464
    ISSN: 1475-3073
    E-ISSN: 1475-3073
    Source: International Bibliography of the Social Sciences (IBSS)
    Source: Hellenic Academic Libraries Link
    Source: Cambridge Journals 2015 HSS Package
    Source: Sociological Abstracts
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  • 7
    Language: English
    In: International journal of social welfare, 2015-07, Vol.24 (3), p.210-222
    Description: Single mothers are vulnerable to living in poverty. The question of how to safeguard the economic status of single mothers in a context of increasing dual earnership is a crucial one. In the present study we addressed this issue by investigating the impact of child benefits on the poverty risk of single mothers in 15 European countries. We focused in particular on the design of child benefits and investigated whether targeting towards single mothers was associated with better poverty reduction. In doing so, we combined information on statutory child benefit entitlement with an empirical analysis of poverty reduction using survey data. We found that: (i) both spending effort and targeting are important to explain the effectiveness of child benefits in reducing single mother poverty; (ii) targeting is related to higher levels of poverty reduction independent of spending effort; yet (iii) it matters how targeting is done.
    Subject(s): child benefits ; Human rights ; Mothers ; Poverty ; single mothers ; Single parents ; Social policy ; targeting ; universalism ; welfare state
    ISSN: 1369-6866
    E-ISSN: 1468-2397
    Source: International Bibliography of the Social Sciences (IBSS)
    Source: Hellenic Academic Libraries Link
    Source: Academic Search Ultimate
    Source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
    Source: Sociological Abstracts
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  • 8
    Language: English
    In: Journal of European social policy, 2013, Vol.23 (1), p.52-67
    Description: Over the course of the past 20 years, welfare states are said to have evolved towards a ‘social investment’ model of welfare – characterized by a focus on equality of opportunity and upward social mobility along with a greater emphasis on individual responsibility. In view of these policy changes, it is necessary to assess whether traditional stratification cleavages (still) affect the occurrence of ‘social risks’. Using data from the 2005 EU-SILC intergenerational module, we consider the impact of social class (of origin) on a relevant selection of risks: unemployment, ill-health, living in a jobless household, single parenthood and low-paid employment. The results provide clear evidence of a substantial influence of social class. On this basis, we argue that social investment strategies need to take stock of the persistence of traditional stratification cleavages. Otherwise, a one-sided approach may create new forms of exclusion and give way to ‘Matthew effects’.
    Subject(s): Allein erziehende Mutter ; Allein erziehender Elternteil ; Arbeitslosigkeit ; Arbeitsmarktrisiko ; Auswirkung ; Belgien ; Bildungsniveau ; Deutschland ; Dänemark ; Eltern ; Finnland ; Frankreich ; Generationenbeziehung ; Gesundheitsgefährdung ; Großbritannien ; Individuum ; Internationaler Vergleich ; Investment policy ; Irland ; Mobilität ; Niederlande ; Niedriglohn ; Norwegen ; Privathaushalt ; Qualifikationsniveau ; Risikogesellschaft ; Risk ; Social classes ; Social investing ; Social policy ; Soziale Herkunft ; Soziale Klasse ; Soziale Schicht ; Welfare
    ISSN: 1461-7269
    ISSN: 0958-9287
    E-ISSN: 1461-7269
    Source: International Bibliography of the Social Sciences (IBSS)
    Source: Hellenic Academic Libraries Link
    Source: Sociological Abstracts
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  • 9
    Language: English
    In: Publius, 2013-10-01, Vol.43 (4), p.626-647
    Description: Comparative studies on the organization of the welfare state in federal systems have referred to Belgium as a model for future federalism, because of its devolutionary nature. In reality, its dyadic or bipolar nature turns Belgian federalism into a unique and highly unstable experiment. However, as long as Brussels obstructs the exit option, the two linguistic groups are doomed to coexistence. Therefore, for Belgium more so than for any other devolutionary state, accommodating both centrifugal dynamics and the need for cohesion is vital. We argue that although dual federalism, including the equality of federal and sub-federal entities and the exclusive allocation of powers, typifies bipolar federal states, a system of shared powers is more suitable when it comes to matters related to social security.
    Subject(s): Belgium ; Central-local government relations ; Comparative studies ; Constitutional courts ; Cooperation ; Economic security ; Federal states ; Federalism ; Government ; Linguistics ; Political parties ; Political power ; Political science research ; Power (Social sciences) ; Research ; Social insurance ; Social security ; Social welfare ; Subnational governments ; Welfare ; Welfare state
    ISSN: 0048-5950
    E-ISSN: 1747-7107
    Source: International Bibliography of the Social Sciences (IBSS)
    Source: JSTOR Arts & Sciences IV
    Source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
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  • 10
    Language: English
    In: Italian Economic Journal, 2019-10-12, Vol.6 (1), p.37-61
    Description: Although employment growth is propagated as being crucial to reduce poverty across EU and OECD countries, the actual impact of employment growth on poverty rates is still unclear. This study presents novel estimates of the association between macro-level trends in women’s employment and trends in poverty, across 15 OECD countries from 1971 to 2013. It does so based on over 2 million household-level observations from the LIS Database, using Kitagawa–Blinder–Oaxaca (KBO) decompositions. The results indicate that an increase of 10% points in women’s employment rate was associated with a reduction of about 1% point of poverty across these countries. In part, this reduction compensated for developments in men’s employment that were associated with higher poverty. However, in the Nordic countries no such poverty association was found, as in these countries women’s employment rates were very high and stable throughout the observation period. In countries that initially showed marked increases in women’s employment, such as the Netherlands, Germany, Spain, Canada, and the United States, the initial increases in women’s employment rates were typically followed by a period in which these trends levelled off. Hence, our findings first and foremost suggest that improving gender equality in employment is associated with lower poverty risks. Yet, the results also suggest that the potential of following an employment strategy to (further) reduce poverty in OECD countries has, to a large extent, been depleted.
    Subject(s): Activation ; Economics ; Economics and Finance ; Employment ; European Integration ; European Union ; Gender ; general ; Poverty ; Research Paper ; Samhällsvetenskap ; Social investment ; Social Sciences ; Sociologi ; Sociologi (exklusive socialt arbete, socialpsykologi och socialantropologi) ; Sociology ; Sociology (excluding Social Work, Social Psychology and Social Anthropology) ; Trends ; Women ; Women’s employment
    ISSN: 2199-322X
    ISSN: 2199-3238
    E-ISSN: 2199-3238
    Source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
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