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  • 1
    Book
    Book
    2013
    ISBN: 0415636930  ISBN: 9780415636933  ISBN: 9781136194764  ISBN: 1136194762 
    Language: English
    In: Contemporary Dystopian Fiction for Young Adults, 2013, Vol.93
    Description: Winner of the Children’s Literature Association Edited Book Award From the jaded, wired teenagers of M.T. Anderson's Feed to the spirited young rebels of Suzanne Collins’ The Hunger Games trilogy, the protagonists of Young Adult dystopias are introducing a new generation of readers to the pleasures and challenges of dystopian imaginings. As the dark universes of YA dystopias continue to flood the market,Contemporary Dystopian Fiction for Young Adults: Brave New Teenagers offers a critical evaluation of the literary and political potentials of this widespread publishing phenomenon. With its capacity to frighten and warn, dystopian writing powerfully engages with our pressing global concerns: liberty and self-determination, environmental destruction and looming catastrophe, questions of identity and justice, and the increasingly fragile boundaries between technology and the self. When directed at young readers, these dystopian warnings are distilled into exciting adventures with gripping plots and accessible messages that may have the potential to motivate a generation on the cusp of adulthood. This collection enacts a lively debate about the goals and efficacy of YA dystopias, with three major areas of contention: do these texts reinscribe an old didacticism or offer an exciting new frontier in children's literature? Do their political critiques represent conservative or radical ideologies? And finally, are these novels high-minded attempts to educate the young or simply bids to cash in on a formula for commercial success? This collection represents a prismatic and evolving understanding of the genre, illuminating its relevance to children's literature and our wider culture.
    Subject(s): 20th Century Literature ; Children's Literature ; Postmodernism Literature ; 21st century ; Young adult fiction, American ; History and criticism ; Dystopias in literature ; Postmodernism (Literature) ; Young adults ; Childrens literature ; Young adult fiction, American -- 21st century -- History and criticism ; Science fiction & fantasy ; Literary criticism ; Ideology ; Young adults literature ; Novels ; Politics ; Cultural identity ; Self concept ; Adolescents ; Fiction
    ISBN: 0415636930
    ISBN: 9780415636933
    ISBN: 9781136194764
    ISBN: 1136194762
    Source: Ebook Central - Academic Complete
    Source: © ProQuest LLC All rights reserved〈img src="https://exlibris-pub.s3.amazonaws.com/PQ_Logo.jpg" style="vertical-align:middle;margin-left:7px"〉
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  • 2
    Book
    Book
    2013
    ISBN: 9781138921924  ISBN: 0415636930  ISBN: 1138921920  ISBN: 9780415636933 
    Language: English
    Description: Winner of the Children’s Literature Association Edited Book Award From the jaded, wired teenagers of M.T. Anderson's Feed to the spirited young rebels of Suzanne Collins’ The Hunger Games trilogy, the protagonists of Young Adult dystopias are introducing a new generation of readers to the pleasures and challenges of dystopian imaginings. As the dark universes of YA dystopias continue to flood the market, Contemporary Dystopian Fiction for Young Adults: Brave New Teenagers offers a critical evaluation of the literary and political potentials of this widespread publishing phenomenon. With its capacity to frighten and warn, dystopian writing powerfully engages with our pressing global concerns: liberty and self-determination, environmental destruction and looming catastrophe, questions of identity and justice, and the increasingly fragile boundaries between technology and the self. When directed at young readers, these dystopian warnings are distilled into exciting adventures with gripping plots and accessible messages that may have the potential to motivate a generation on the cusp of adulthood. This collection enacts a lively debate about the goals and efficacy of YA dystopias, with three major areas of contention: do these texts reinscribe an old didacticism or offer an exciting new frontier in children's literature? Do their political critiques represent conservative or radical ideologies? And finally, are these novels high-minded attempts to educate the young or simply bids to cash in on a formula for commercial success? This collection represents a prismatic and evolving understanding of the genre, illuminating its relevance to children's literature and our wider culture. Introduction Balaka Basu, Katherine R. Broad, and Carrie Hintz Part I: Freedom and Constraint: Adolescent Liberty and Self Determination 1. What Faction Are You In?: The Pleasure of Being Sorted in Veronica Roth’s Divergent Balaka Basu 2. Coming of Age in Dystopia: Reading Genre in Holly Black’s Curse Workers Series Emily Lauer 3. Embodying the Postmetropolis in Catherine Fisher’s Incarceron and Sapphique Carissa Turner Smith Part II: Society and Environment: Building a Better World 4. Hope in Dark Times: Climate Change and the World Risk Society in Saci Lloyd’s The Carbon Diaries 2015 and 2017 Alexa Weik von Mossner 5. Educating Desire, Choosing Justice? Susan Beth Pfeffer’s Last Survivors Series and Julie Bertagna’s Exodus Claire P. Curtis 6. On the Brink: The Role of Young Adult Culture in Environmental Degradation Elaine Ostry Part III: Radical or Conservative? Polemics of the Future 7. "The Dandelion in the Spring": Utopia as Romance in Suzanne Collins’s The Hunger Games Trilogy Katherine R. Broad 8. The Future is Pale: Race in Contemporary Young Adult Dystopian Novels Mary J. Couzelis 9. Technology and Models of Literacy in Young Adult Dystopian Fiction Kristi McDuffie Part IV: Biotechnologies of the Self: Humanity in a Posthuman Age 10. Dystopian Sacrifice, Scapegoats, and Neal Shusterman’s Unwind Susan Louise Stewart 11. The Soul of the Clone: Coming of Age as a Posthuman in Nancy Farmer’s The House of the Scorpion Erin T. Newcomb 12. Parables for the Postmodern, Post-9.11, and Posthuman World: Carrie Ryan's Forest of Hands and Teeth Books, M. T. Anderson's Feed , and Mary E. Pearson's The Adoration of Jenna Fox Thomas J. Morrissey Winner of the Children’s Literature Association Edited Book Award "Notably, regardless of whether they have or have not read the novels and whether they are laypersons or scholars, all readers are placed on equal footing. This feature of Contemporary Dystopian Fiction for Young Adults makes it a great choice for those who want to pick it up as a guide to expand their knowledge on both literary and ideological sides of YA dystopian writing. (..) Highly recommended for academics as well as for chidlren's literature fans." - Robert Gadowski, University of Wroclaw, Poland, Bookbord, Vol. 53, No. 3, 2015 Balaka Basu is a Ph.D. candidate in English at The Graduate Center, City University of New York, US. Katherine R. Broad holds a Ph.D. in English from The Graduate Center, City University of New York, US. Carrie Hintz is Associate Professor of English at Queens College and The Graduate Center, City University of New York, US.
    Subject(s): Teenager ; Young Adult ; Literature ; 20th Century Literature ; Children's Literature ; Contemporary ; Dystopia ; Postmodernism Literature ; Research ; Fiction
    ISBN: 9781138921924
    ISBN: 0415636930
    ISBN: 1138921920
    ISBN: 9780415636933
    Source: Ebook Central - Academic Complete
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  • 3
    Book
    Book
    2013
    ISBN: 0415636930  ISBN: 9780415636933 
    Language: English
    Subject(s): Young adult fiction, American ; Dystopias in literature ; Postmodernism (Literature)
    ISBN: 0415636930
    ISBN: 9780415636933
    Source: Ebook Central - Academic Complete
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  • 4
    Dissertation
    Dissertation
    2012
    ISBN: 9781267344472  ISBN: 1267344474 
    Language: English
    Description: Utopian literature is typically read as a transformative genre that compels readers to rethink the norms and assumptions that govern their worlds. But what kinds of imaginative work does the genre perform with regards to women's status in the ideal society, and how has this work developed—or failed to—in more recent utopian texts? Courting Utopia: The Romance Plot in Contemporary Utopian Fiction focuses on a specific subgenre of utopian literature known as the feminist critical utopia, which emerged in the 1970s out of previous utopian genres and continues to develop today. Despite the genre's aspirations for social change, however, I observe an ongoing refusal to challenge, let alone transform, normative gender roles in feminist critical utopian texts, a limitation that persists because the novels remain wedded to traditional narrative conventions carried over from earlier utopian forms. Ultimately, the genre remains predominantly structured not around the rhetoric of social change, as utopian scholars generally presume, but around the rhetorics of romance. Looking at the work of Marge Piercy, Margaret Atwood, and Ursula K. Le Guin, who have been central to defining the field, as well as recent popular novelists Suzanne Collins and Scott Westerfeld who show where the feminist critical utopia is moving in the twenty-first century, I detail how the romance plot undermines the feminist utopian project by restricting the utopian imagination to traditional gender roles. Identifying romance as a key obstacle to the imagining of more radical forms of social change, I break company with those who see authors like Piercy, Atwood, and Le Guin as the paragons of the genre and instead look to Robert C. O'Brien, Samuel R. Delany, and finally Toni Morrison for alternative narratives that move beyond romance to reimagine feminist critical utopian worlds. The persistence of the romance plot in contemporary feminist critical utopias has been largely overlooked by utopian scholarship, but contending with how this pervasive plotline shapes utopian possibilities stands to offer new insights into the development of more open, oppositional, and liberatory female characters and feminist alternatives to the status quo.
    Subject(s): Modern literature ; Canadian literature ; American literature
    ISBN: 9781267344472
    ISBN: 1267344474
    Source: ProQuest Dissertations & Theses Global
    Source: © ProQuest LLC All rights reserved〈img src="https://exlibris-pub.s3.amazonaws.com/PQ_Logo.jpg" style="vertical-align:middle;margin-left:7px"〉
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  • 5
    Book chapter
    Book chapter
    2013
    ISBN: 0415636930  ISBN: 9780415636933 
    Language: English
    In: Contemporary Dystopian Fiction for Young Adults, 2013, p.171-186
    Description: Dystopian fi ction offers a vision of a future train wreck, but one that provides temporal safety: “We haven’t quite reached that point,” we say with relief. “Not yet. And maybe we won’t with due diligence.” Fredric Jameson refers to dystopia as “a ‘near future’ novel [that] tells the story of an imminent disaster-ecology, overpopulation, plague, drought, the stray comet or nuclear accident-waiting to come to pass in our own near future, which is fast-forwarded in the time of the novel.”1 Lyman Tower Sargent offers a similar defi nition. “The traditional dystopia,” writes Sargent, “was an extrapolation from the present that involved a warning. . . . The dystopia . . . says if you behave thus and so, this is how you will be punished.”2 Sargent continues with what has become a frequently quoted defi nition. He characterizes the dystopia as “a non-existent society . . . normally located in time and space that the author intended a contemporaneous reader to view as considerably worse than the society in which that reader lived.”3 For Jameson, Sargent, and many other scholars, dystopias are cautionary tales set in a future with recognizable features.
    ISBN: 0415636930
    ISBN: 9780415636933
    Source: Ebook Central - Academic Complete
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  • 6
    Language: English
    In: Contemporary Dystopian Fiction for Young Adults, 2013, p.201-214
    Description: Dystopian fi ction for young adults celebrates the potential for personal and species advancement without sugarcoating the very real dangers we and our progeny face in the postmodern and posthuman environment. YA dystopias are fi ctive versions of the contemporary world that promote refl ection and critique. Their enormous and growing popularity suggests that we live at a pivotal moment in human history just as the members of the intended youth audience are experiencing pivotal moments in their own development. The phrase “brave new” in the title of this collection is an intertextual invocation of Shakespeare and Aldous Huxley, those literary bookends between whom the modern world rises and falls. Eighty years after Brave New World (1931), we live and raise our children in what Paul Crutzen and Eugene Stoermer have dubbed the Anthropocene,1 the geo-historical moment of uncertain duration in which humans wave with abandon a wand more awesome than any stick Prospero or even Huxley could have fashioned. Like Prospero, we want something better for our children; like John the Savage, we fear it doesn’t exist. I have called the YA dystopias under discussion parables not because they are short, straightforward didactic analogies-far from it. They are, however, imaginative and encouraging extrapolations that offer ethical pathways to better futures than current behavioral paradigms are likely to produce. All of these pathways require that we stop expecting different results from the same behaviors and adopt what I am calling a posthuman perspective.
    ISBN: 0415636930
    ISBN: 9780415636933
    Source: Ebook Central - Academic Complete
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  • 7
    Book chapter
    Book chapter
    2013
    ISBN: 0415636930  ISBN: 9780415636933 
    Language: English
    In: Contemporary Dystopian Fiction for Young Adults, 2013, p.129-142
    Description: Suzanne Collins’s The Hunger Games trilogy (2008-2010) has been widely celebrated for its portrayal of a tough-minded young woman who, through a mix of gumption and luck, challenges authority to become a central fi gure in a larger revolution against a violent dystopian regime. Collins boldly fl outs literary stereotypes that keep female protagonists waiting at home, and proclaims that girls can do anything boys can do, including strategize, make demands, and even hunt and kill. Readers across the blogosphere have written extensively about their excitement over Katniss and her fi ght. “I would encourage my daughter to read this series,” writes one fashion blogger. A former political science professor glows, “I am thrilled that a popular book series features a strong, kick-ass-and-take-names female character.”1 Feminist pop culture authority Bitch Magazine extols “Katniss Everdeen’s value as a feminist heroine” and includes The Hunger Games on its list of “100 Young Adult Books for the Feminist Reader.”2 It is hardly an exaggeration when Meghan Lewitt declares this “tough-as-nails” protagonist “the most important female character in recent pop culture history.” “Katniss Everdeen is more than just a teen idol of the moment,” Lewitt insists. “She is a heroine for the ages.”3
    ISBN: 0415636930
    ISBN: 9780415636933
    Source: Ebook Central - Academic Complete
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  • 8
    Book chapter
    Book chapter
    2013
    ISBN: 0415636930  ISBN: 9780415636933 
    Language: English
    In: Contemporary Dystopian Fiction for Young Adults, 2013, p.81-96
    Description: We live in troubled times. According to the United Nations, climate change is among the most serious and far-reaching threats to human life on earth. The UN Global Issues website states: “By the middle of the 20th century, it was becoming clear that . . . the process of ‘global warming’ was accelerating. Today, nearly all scientists agree that we must stop and reverse this process now-or face a devastating cascade of natural disasters that will change life on earth as we know it.”1 Scientists have also sent out dire warnings. NASA climatologist James Hansen writes in Storms of My Grandchildren (2009) that we now have clear evidence that “the continued exploitation of all fossil fuels on Earth threatens not only the other millions of species on the planet but also the survival of humanity itself-and the timetable is shorter than we thought.”2 In his 2011 Eaarth: Making Life on a Tough New Planet, the internationally renowned environmentalist Bill McKibben even claims that we should give our planet a new name (Eaarth), because the life-friendly habitat we used to call “earth” is already on its way to becoming an inhospitable place, “with melting poles and dying forests and a heaving, corrosive sea, raked by winds, strafed by storms, scorched by heat.”3
    ISBN: 0415636930
    ISBN: 9780415636933
    Source: Ebook Central - Academic Complete
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  • 9
    Book chapter
    Book chapter
    2013
    ISBN: 0415636930  ISBN: 9780415636933 
    Language: English
    In: Contemporary Dystopian Fiction for Young Adults, 2013, p.63-78
    Description: While the Foucauldian notion of disciplinary societies proves somewhat fruitful as a framework for understanding the Realm in Fisher’s work, the wholesale application of panopticism to Incarceron requires more nuance: there are signifi cant differences in the spatial organizations of Incarceron and the panoptic prison. Fisher has said that Incarceron was partially inspired by Giovanni Battista Piranesi’s Carceri d’invenzione, a series of eighteenth-century engravings depicting vast, dark, labyrinthine prisons.5 In Discipline and Punish, Foucault explicitly contrasts the light, open, observable spaces of the panoptic prison with “the ruined prisons, littered with mechanisms of torture, to be seen in Piranese’s [sic] engravings.”6 The space of Incarceron differs signifi cantly from this panoptic prison. Most notably, centralization of space is essential to the functioning of the panoptic gaze: one of Jeremy Bentham’s dictates was that, in the Panopticon, “the inmate will constantly have before his eyes the tall outline of the central tower from which he is spied upon.”7 Moreover, the Panopticon’s “enclosed nature does not preclude a permanent presence from the outside . . . anyone may come and exercise in the central tower the functions of surveillance.”8 In Incarceron, by contrast, space is decentralized, and surveillance accomplished through a series of red eyes in every corridor and wing of the Prison. Though the Prison watches its inmates through these eyes, the only outside observer who has access to the images recorded through the eyes-or, indeed, access to the Prison at all-is the Warden.
    ISBN: 0415636930
    ISBN: 9780415636933
    Source: Ebook Central - Academic Complete
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  • 10
    Book chapter
    Book chapter
    2013
    ISBN: 0415636930  ISBN: 9780415636933 
    Language: English
    In: Contemporary Dystopian Fiction for Young Adults, 2013, p.47-62
    Description: When the Pixar fi lm The Incredibles was released in 2004, viewers and reviewers alike were able to recognize its similarities to an objectivist parable because it contains, among other things, an anti-regulation plot. As A.O. Scott’s review noted, when the fi lm opens, “Various do-gooders, meddlers and bureaucrats . . . have driven the world’s once-admired superheroes underground, into lives of bland split-level normalcy.”1 The government in The Incredibles creates a right-wing dystopia of a kind generally associated with Ayn Rand’s ideas: an oppressive regulatory regime is presented in order to glorify a utopian “free” capitalist economy in contrast. In the article “Utopia Beyond Our Ideals: The Dilemma of the Right-Wing Utopia” (1991), Peter Fitting describes a libertarian utopia as one that embraces the “premise that too much government regulation and interference” have created a real-world crisis that needs to be addressed as dystopian.2 Fitting uses Ayn Rand’s novel Atlas Shrugged (1957) as an example of this kind of utopia. The objectivist dystopia in The Incredibles, like that in Rand’s novels, implies a contrasting objectivist utopia where the “problem” of government regulation does not exist.
    ISBN: 0415636930
    ISBN: 9780415636933
    Source: Ebook Central - Academic Complete
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