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  • 1
    Language: English
    In: Comparative Studies of South Asia, Africa and the Middle East, 2013, Vol.33(1), p.102
    Description: This article has grown out of the attempt to contextualize Muslims' debates on funerary practice in contemporary Tanzania within the broader history of Muslim reformism. While funerals became an object of contention very early on in the history of the Muslim Middle East, the topic does not figure prominently in studies of debates provoked by modern reformism.1 Several observers, though, have reported dissension over funerals from Indonesia.2 In particular, John Bowen's account on reformism in the Gayo region of Aceh's mountainous interior from the 1920s through the 1980s shows striking similarities to events in Tanzania from 1990-2000s.3 In both cases, the choice between different regimes of funerary practice became an 'unavoidable religious diacritic,' in Bowen's terms, of allegiance to one or the other side in a struggle between 'traditionalist' and reformist Muslims.4 In both cases, the reformists insist on paring down funeral rites to make them accord with their understanding of prophetic practice and object particularly to a ritual, known as telkin in Aceh and as talkini in Tanzania, of 'instructing' the dead for their encounter with the angels of death.5 Reprinted by permission of Duke University Press
    Subject(s): Ritual ; Funerary Rites ; Muslims ; 20th Century ; Reformism ; Religious Traditions ; Regions ; Tanzania ; Anthropology;
    ISSN: 1548-226X
    ISSN: 1089201X
    E-ISSN: 1548-226X
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  • 2
    Language: English
    In: AFRICAN AFFAIRS, 2013
    Description: This article examines the changing uses of political rhetoric around the burial of Julius Nyerere in 1999. It argues that the ruling party uses rhetoric as a means of 'soft power', but also documents how this rhetoric, though geared towards legitimizing Nyerere's successors, employed tropes that were rejected by some people and were used by others to critique leaders who were perceived to lack the selfless integrity attributed to Nyerere. The article compares funerary songs by a government-sponsored band, popular at the time of Nyerere's death, with memories of Nyerere in rural areas in the early to mid-2000s. While the image of Nyerere in the funeral songs as a benign family patriarch writ large still persists, it coexists with strongly divergent constructions of Nyerere as an authoritarian ruler or a self-seeking profiteer. Moreover, the 'official', benign Nyerere has been employed not only by government and party faithful, but also by striking workers, opposition politicians, and critical newspapers as a measure of the shortcomings of his successors. The invocation of Nyerere as a paragon of an endangered ideal of virtue in public office indicates widespread anxieties towards a state that often disappoints but occasionally delivers, in unpredictable turns, and the limits of the government's ability to shut down dissent. Adapted from the source document. Reprinted by permission of Oxford University Press
    Subject(s): Governance
    ISSN: 0001-9909
    E-ISSN: 14682621
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  • 3
    In: The Journal of African History, 2014, Vol.55(2), pp.161-171
    Description: Abstract The Indian Ocean is frequently depicted as a sphere of seamless connectivity, characterized by fluid and wide-ranging exchanges between traders, sea-farers, clerics, intellectuals, and authors. We seek to nuance this depiction by highlighting the importance of specific, place-bound social concerns that tempered these cosmopolitan performances of citizenship with more exclusionary dynamics. Our goal is to emphasize the importance of context, contingency, and circumstance in shaping and breaking new forms and practices of citizenship and its twin – exclusionary politics – on Africa's Indian Ocean littoral.
    Subject(s): Special Feature: Africa And The Indian Ocean; Historiography; Eastern Africa; Southern Africa; Slavery; Islam; Trade; Political Culture
    ISSN: 0021-8537
    E-ISSN: 1469-5138
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  • 4
    Language: English
    In: The International Journal of African Historical Studies, 2015, Vol.48(2), pp.209-II
    Description: [...]it is intimately tied to the question of the silence or guarded, coded speech surrounding slavery.\n Our conversations took place about eighty years after official abolition in Tanganyika, and about a hundred years after slave labor regimes had begun to crumble, but, as the preceding ages have sought to show, the memory of slavery surrounded them when they grew up. [...]I think it is important to identify reasons why social memory should, on certain questions, depart from or skew the facts, such as the status implications of slave antecedents discussed above, which made owning up to such antecedents problematic.
    Subject(s): Africa ; Slavery ; Slave Trade ; Emancipation of Slaves ; Archives & Records ; African Languages ; Studies ; Historians ; 20th Century ; African History ; Females ; Collective Memory ; Swahili ; Silence ; Antecedents ; Duke University Press ; Cambridge University ; University of California Press
    ISSN: 03617882
    E-ISSN: 23263016
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  • 5
    Language: English
    In: African studies review, 2015, Vol.58(2), pp.111-133
    Description: This article examines Muslim involvement, or lack of it, in AIDS services provision in Tanzania. It argues that Muslims find it harder than Christians to work with Western donors whose conceptions of civil society and volunteering do not accurately reflect the institutional practices of Muslims. Many Muslims also mistrust the role played by the state in brokering cooperation. Nevertheless, Muslims seek to engage with the volunteering discourse and have established some organizations that are visible to aid institutions. The complexity of this process reveals the political tensions and unstated agendas on the part of donors that are usually obscured by the notion of "volunteering." Cet article examine l'engagement des musulmans, ou l'absence d'engagement, dans les prestations de service pour la lutte contre le Sida en Tanzanie. Il fait valoir que les musulmans trouvent plus difficile que les chretiens de travailler avec des donateurs occidentaux, dont les conceptions de la societe civile et le benevolat ne refletent pas fidelement les pratiques institutionnelles des musulmans. Beaucoup de musulmans se mefient egalement du role joue par l'Etat dans l'organisation de la cooperation. Neanmoins, les musulmans cherchent a s'engager dans le discours du benevolat et ont mis en place certaines organisations qui sont visibles pour les institutions d'aide humanitaire. La complexite de ce processus revele les tensions politiques et les intentions des donateurs prives qui sont habituellement masquees par la notion de "volontariat." Keywords: Tanzania; Islam; AIDS; aid; work; volunteering; politics of development doi: 10.1017/asr.2015.40
    Subject(s): AIDS (Disease) ; Patients ; Services for ; Tanzania ; Voluntarism ; Tanzania ; History ; Muslims ; Tanzania ; Social Conditions ; History & Archaeology
    ISSN: 0002-0206
    E-ISSN: 1555-2462
    Source: Project MUSE
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  • 6
    Language: English
    In: African Studies Review, Sep 2015, Vol.58(2), pp.111-133
    Description: This article examines Muslim involvement, or lack of it, in AIDS services provision in Tanzania. It argues that Muslims find it harder than Christians to work with Western donors whose conceptions of civil society and volunteering do not accurately reflect the institutional practices of Muslims. Many Muslims also mistrust the role played by the state in brokering cooperation. Nevertheless, Muslims seek to engage with the volunteering discourse and have established some organizations that are visible to aid institutions. The complexity of this process reveals the political tensions and unstated agendas on the part of donors that are usually obscured by the notion of "volunteering."
    Subject(s): Tanzania ; Muslims ; Volunteers ; Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome–AIDS ; Health Services ; Human Immunodeficiency Virus–HIV ; Politics ; Tanzania ; Islam ; AIDS ; Aid ; Work ; Volunteering ; Politics of Development
    ISSN: 00020206
    E-ISSN: 15552462
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  • 7
    Language: English
    In: JOURNAL OF RELIGION IN AFRICA, 2016
    Description: This paper offers a close examination of statements on patriarchal masculinity from three widely traded sermon recordings produced in Zanzibar, Tanzania. It sets them in the context of Islamic reform, Muslim political discontent, and the consumption of sermon recordings in East Africa. Despite similar assertions on the need for men to protect and control women, in close reading the three preachers offer quite divergent characterisations of the patriarch’s methods, obligations, and entitlements within the household. The sermons show that Islamic reform in Zanzibar cannot be reduced to political discontent, and that it hearkens back to longstanding regional history. They also suggest that the concept of patriarchy is more relevant to the understanding of asymmetrical gender relations than recent discussion of Western gender relations has allowed, and highlight the centrality of bearing and rearing children as a site for both assertion and failure of patriarchal control. Lastly, they indicate the failure of sermon preachers and listeners to coalesce into a coherent counterpublic.
    Subject(s): Social Sciences ; History And Archaeology ; Philosophy And Religion ; Islam ; East Africa ; Patriarchy ; Masculinity ; Women ; Preaching
    ISSN: 0022-4200
    E-ISSN: 15700666
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  • 8
    Language: English
    In: Africa, 05/2012, Vol.82(2), pp.326-327
    Subject(s): Aids (Disease);
    ISSN: 0001-9720
    E-ISSN: 1750-0184
    Source: CrossRef
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  • 9
    Language: English
    In: Journal of Neurology, 2014, Vol.261(10), pp.1881-1886
    Description: Mutations in SLC2A1 , encoding the glucose transporter type 1 (Glut1), cause a wide range of neurological disorders: (1) classical Glut1 deficiency syndrome (Glut1-DS) with an early onset epileptic encephalopathy including a severe epilepsy, psychomotor delay, ataxia and microcephaly, (2) paroxysmal exercise-induced dyskinesia (PED) and (3) various forms of idiopathic/genetic generalized epilepsies such as different forms of absence epilepsies. Up to now, focal epilepsy was not associated with SLC2A1 mutations. Here, we describe four cases in which focal seizures present the main or at least initial category of seizures. Two patients suffered from a classical Glut1-DS, whereas two individuals presented with focal epilepsy related to PED. We identified three novel SLC2A1 mutations in these unrelated individuals. Our study underscores that focal epilepsy can be caused by SLC2A1 mutations or that focal seizures may present the main type of seizures. Patients with focal epilepsy and PED should undergo genetic testing and can benefit from a ketogenic diet. But also individuals with pharmaco-resistant focal epilepsy and cognitive impairment might be candidates for genetic testing in SLC2A1 .
    Subject(s): SLC2A1 ; Genetics ; Absence epilepsy ; Paroxysmal exertion-induced dyskinesia ; PED ; Focal seizures
    ISSN: 0340-5354
    E-ISSN: 1432-1459
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  • 10
    In: Journal of Global History, 2008, Vol.3(2), pp.227-249
    Description: Abstract Many societies became Muslim gradually, without conquest by Muslim rulers. Explanations of this process typically focus on Muslim traders, proselytizing ‘holy men’, and the conversion of ruling elites, as the limited sources suggest. Yet it cannot be assumed that Islamization always made sense for elites as a power-enhancing stratagem, or that rulers or holy men were willing or able to shape the religious allegiances of commoners. In fact, studies of contemporary Islamic societies demonstrate the relative autonomy of commoners’ religious observance, and the tendency of elites towards accommodation. Evidence from a recently Islamized region in East Africa shows that, rather than following elite converts, ordinary villagers initiated rural Islamization. They learned from coastal Muslim ritual rather than scripture, and evoked Islam to challenge social hierarchies and assert a more egalitarian social ethos. The possibility of similar processes also exists in other sites of gradual Islamization.
    Subject(s): Religious History ; Islam ; Religious Conversion ; Social Structure ; Elites ; Rural Areas ; Ritual ; Religious Behaviour ; Tanzania ; Anthropology;
    ISSN: 1740-0228
    E-ISSN: 1740-0236
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