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  • 1
    Online Resource
    Online Resource
    2019-2020
    ISBN: 9780812296761 
    Person(s): Bainton, Henry
    Title: History and the Written Word
    Subtitle: Documents, Literacy, and Language in the Age of the Angevins
    Publisher(s): University of Pennsylvania Press
    Year of publication: 2019-2020
    Document type: Online Resource
    ISBN: 9780812296761
    Terms of use: Vorläufiger Zugriff bis zum Jahresende
    Abstract: Coming upon the text of a document such as a charter or a letter inserted into the fabric of a medieval chronicle and "ed in full or at length, modern readers might well assume that the chronicler is simply doing what good historians have always done-that is, citing his source as evidence. Such documentary insertions are not ubiquitous in medieval historiography, however, and are in fact particularly characteristic of the history-writing produced by the Angevins in England and Northern France in the later twelfth century.In History and the Written Word, Henry Bainton puts these documentary gestures center stage in an attempt to understand what the chroniclers were doing historiographically, socially, and culturally when they transcribed a document into a work of history. Where earlier scholars who have looked at the phenomenon have explained this increased use of documents by considering the growing bureaucratic state and an increasing historiographical concern for documentary evidence, Bainton seeks to resituate these histories, together with their authors and users, within literate but sub-state networks of political power. Proposing a new category he designates "literate lordship" to describe the form of power with which documentary history-writing was especially concerned, he shows how important the vernacular was in recording the social lives of these literate lords and how they found it a particularly appropriate medium through which to record their roles in history.Drawing on the perspectives of modern and medieval narratology, medieval multilingualism, and cultural memory, History and the Written Word argues that members of an administrative elite demonstrated their mastery of the rules of literate political behavior by producing and consuming history-writing and its documents
    Link(s): Fulltext
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  • 2
    Title: Universal chronicles in the High Middle Ages
    Publisher(s): Woodbridge, Suffolk : York Medieval Press
    Document type: Online Resource
    Physical description: 1 Online-Ressource (xii, 315 Seiten)
    ISBN: 978-1-78744-033-3
    Identifier: 10.1017/9781787440333
    Parallel edition(s): Erscheint auch als: Druck-Ausgabe: 978-1-903153-73-4
    Abstract: Found in pre-modern cultures of every era and across the world, from the ancient Near East to medieval Latin Christendom, the universal chronicle is simultaneously one of the most ubiquitous pre-modern cultural forms and one of the most overlooked. Universal chronicles narrate the history of the whole world from the time of its creation up to the then present day, treating the world's affairs as though they were part of a single organic reality, and uniting various strands of history into a unifed, coherent story. They reveal a great deal about how the societies that produced them understood their world and how historical narrative itself can work to produce that understanding. The essays here offer new perspectives on the genre, from a number of different disciplines, demonstrating their vitality, flexibility and cultural importance, They reveal them to be deeply political texts, which allowed history-writers and their audiences to locate themselves in space, time and in the created universe. Several chapters address the manuscript context, looking at the innovative techniques of compilation, structure and layout that placed them at the cutting edge of medieval book technology. Others analyse the background of universal chronicles, and identify their circulation amongst different social groups; there are also investigations into their literary discourse, patronage, authorship and diffusion. Michele Campopiano is Senior Lecturer in Medieval Latin Literature at the University of York; Henry Bainton is Lecturer in High Medieval Literature at the University of York. Contributors:Tobias Andersson, Michele Campopiano, Cornelia Dreer, Catherine Gaullier-Bougassas, Elena Koroleva, Keith Lilley, Andrew Marsham, Rosa M. Rodriguez Porto, Christophe Thierry, Elizabeth M. Tyler, Steven Vanderputten, Bjorn Weiler, Claudia Wittig
    Link(s): Fulltext
    Link(s): Fulltext
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