placeholder
and
and

Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Export
Filter
Document type
Language
Year
  • 1
    Language: English
    In: Journal of management studies, 2020-12, Vol.57 (8), p.1763-1766
    Description: Keywords: dirty work; identity; occupational identification; organizational identification Byline: Blake E. Ashforth
    Subject(s): COVID-19 ; dirty work ; identity ; occupational identification ; organizational identification ; Pandemics
    ISSN: 0022-2380
    E-ISSN: 1467-6486
    Source: International Bibliography of the Social Sciences (IBSS)
    Source: Business Source Ultimate
    Source: Hellenic Academic Libraries Link
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    Language: English
    In: Administrative science quarterly, 2014-09-01, Vol.59 (3), p.474-516
    Description: We report the results of an ethnographic study of a natural food cooperative in which we found an inherent tension in its mission between idealism and pragmatism, and we explore the dynamics through which that tension was managed and engaged in day-to-day governance and activities. Insights from participant observation, archival data, semi-structured interviews, and surveys provide a detailed and holistic account of the intergroup and intragroup processes through which the co-op negotiated its dualistic nature, as embodied in its hybrid organizational identity. The findings suggest that the value of each side of the duality was recognized at both the individual and organizational levels. Members' discomfort with the duality, however, led them to split the mission in two and identify with one part, while projecting their less-favored part on others, creating an identity foil (an antithesis). This splitting resulted in ingroups and outgroups and heated intergroup conflict over realizing cooperative ideals vs. running a viable business. Ingroup members favoring one part of the mission nonetheless identified with the outgroup favoring the other because it embodied a side of themselves they continued to value. Individuals who exemplified their ingroup's most extreme attributes were seen by the outgroup as prototypical, thus serving as "lightning rods" for intergroup conflict; this dynamic paradoxically enabled other ingroup members to work more effectively with moderate members of the outgroup. The idealist-pragmatist duality was kept continually in play over time through oscillating decisions and actions that shifted power from one group to the other, coupled with ongoing rituals to repair and maintain relationships disrupted by the messiness of the process. Thus ostensible dysfunctionality at the group level fostered functionality at the organizational level.
    Subject(s): Agriculture, Cooperative ; Aims and objectives ; Conflict resolution ; Cooperation ; Cooperatives ; Ethnography ; Food ; Governance ; Group dynamics ; Group identity ; Idealism ; Identity ; Influence ; Intergroup Relations ; Interorganizational relations ; Lightning ; Management ; Management theory ; Managerial authority ; Natural & organic foods ; Observation ; Organizational identity ; Paradoxes ; Pragmatism ; Rituals ; Studies ; Values ; We they distinction
    ISSN: 0001-8392
    E-ISSN: 1930-3815
    Source: International Bibliography of the Social Sciences (IBSS)
    Source: Business Source Ultimate
    Source: JSTOR Arts & Sciences IV
    Source: Sociological Abstracts
    Source: Get It Now
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 3
    Language: English
    In: Journal of organizational behavior, 2015-08, Vol.36 (6), p.749-769
    Description: Emotional labor (expressing emotions as part of one’s job duties, as in “service with a smile”) can be beneficial for employees, organizations, and customers. Meta-analytical summaries reveal that deep acting (summoning up the appropriate feelings one wants to display) generally has positive outcomes. Unlike surface acting (faking emotions), deep acting does not harm employee well-being, and deep acting is positively related with job satisfaction, organizational commitment, job performance, and customer satisfaction. Emerging research also suggests that a third form of emotional labor, natural and genuine emotional labor, is a frequently used emotional labor strategy that has positive effects for both employees and customers. We examine how identity processes shape how employees experience emotional labor, and we maintain that when employees identify with their roles, emotional labor augments and affirms their identity. Person-job fit is an important moderator that influences whether emotional labor enhances or hinders employee well-being. Emotional labor may also have positive outcomes when organizations grant more autonomy and adopt positive display rules that call for the expression of positive emotions. Recent research also indicates that emotional labor strategies may improve leadership effectiveness. Research opportunities on the bright side of emotional labor are abundant.
    Subject(s): Analysis ; Customer satisfaction ; customer service ; Emotion regulation ; emotional labor ; emotional regulation ; Emotions ; Employees ; Excellence ; identification ; Job satisfaction ; Leadership ; Meta-analysis ; Organizational behavior ; Point-Counterpoint ; Studies
    ISSN: 0894-3796
    E-ISSN: 1099-1379
    Source: Business Source Ultimate
    Source: Hellenic Academic Libraries Link
    Source: JSTOR Arts & Sciences IV
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 4
    Language: English
    In: Organization science (Providence, R.I.), 2014-10, Vol.25 (5), p.1453-1478
    Description: The experience of simultaneously positive and negative orientations toward a person, goal, task, idea, and such appears to be quite common in organizations, but it is poorly understood. We develop a multilevel perspective on ambivalence in organizations that demonstrates how this phenomenon is integral to certain cognitive and emotional processes and important outcomes. Specifically, we discuss the organizational triggers of ambivalence and the cognitive and emotional mechanisms through which ambivalence diffuses between the individual and collective levels of analysis. We offer an integrative framework of major responses to highly intense ambivalence (avoidance, domination, compromise, and holism) that is applicable to actors at the individual and collective levels. The positive and negative outcomes associated with each response, and the conditions under which each is most effective, are explored. Although ambivalence is uncomfortable for actors, it has the potential to foster growth in the actor as well as highly adaptive and effective behavior.
    Subject(s): Ambivalence ; avoidance ; Behavior ; Cognition ; Cognition & reasoning ; Cognitive psychology ; Collectivism ; compromise ; Conflicts ; coping mechanisms ; defense mechanisms ; domination ; dualities ; Emotion ; emotional contagion ; Emotional defense mechanisms ; Emotional intelligence ; Emotional states ; Emotions ; Holism ; hybrid identities ; Mindfulness ; Multidimensional analysis ; multilevel ; Organizational behavior ; Organizational behaviour ; Organizations ; paradox ; Paradoxes ; role conflicts ; Sense making ; sensegiving ; sensemaking ; Studies ; Wisdom
    ISSN: 1047-7039
    E-ISSN: 1526-5455
    Source: International Bibliography of the Social Sciences (IBSS)
    Source: Business Source Ultimate
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 5
    Language: English
    In: The Academy of Management review, 2015-04-01, Vol.40 (2), p.163-181
    Description: An unexplored paradox of organizational identification is its possible association with behaviors that exploit the organization for personal benefit. In this article we address why, for some individuals in positions of power and authority in the organization, organizational identification is a path to viewing the organization as eminently exploitable. We introduce "narcissistic organizational identification," a form of organizational identification that features the individual's tendency to see his/her identity as core to the definition of the organization, in contrast to conventional conceptualizations of organizational identification, where the individual sees the organization as core to the definition of self. We provide theory explaining how antecedents of conventional organizational identification—including a sense of control and influence over the organization, a sense of psychological ownership of the organization, a sense that the organization is regarded highly by others, and a sense that others identify one in terms of the organization—can instead lead to narcissistic organizational identification in the presence of narcissism, a relatively stable personality dimension that includes grandiosity, self-importance, and a sense of superiority and entitlement.
    Subject(s): Analysis ; Authority ; Behavior ; Chief executive officers ; Corporate identity ; Corporate image ; Ethical aspects ; Identification ; Individuals ; Influence ; Management ; Management science ; Narcissism ; Occupational psychology ; Organization ; Organizational behavior ; Ownership ; Personality disorders ; Power ; Self image ; Studies ; U.S.A
    ISSN: 0363-7425
    E-ISSN: 1930-3807
    Source: International Bibliography of the Social Sciences (IBSS)
    Source: Business Source Ultimate
    Source: JSTOR Arts & Sciences IV
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 6
    Language: English
    In: The Academy of Management review, 2016-01-01, Vol.41 (1), p.28-60
    Description: Despite recognizing the importance of personal identification in organizations, researchers have rarely explored its dynamics. We define personal identification as perceived oneness with another individual, where one defines oneself in terms of the other. While many scholars have found that personal identification is associated with helpful effects, others have found it harmful. To resolve this contradiction, we distinguish between three paths to personal identification—threat-focused, opportunity-focused, and closeness-focused paths—and articulate a model that includes each. We examine the contextual features, how individuals' identities are constructed, and the likely outcomes that follow in the three paths. We conclude with a discussion of how the threat-, opportunity-, and closeness-focused personal identification processes potentially blend, as well as implications for future research and practice.
    Subject(s): Analysis ; Effects ; Identification ; Identity ; Organizational behavior ; Organizational behaviour ; Studies
    ISSN: 0363-7425
    E-ISSN: 1930-3807
    Source: International Bibliography of the Social Sciences (IBSS)
    Source: Business Source Ultimate
    Source: JSTOR Arts & Sciences IV
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 7
    Language: English
    In: The Academy of Management review, 2007-01-01, Vol.32 (1), p.9-32
    Description: We explore the meaning and significance of relational identity and relational identification, predicated on the role-relationship between two individuals. We argue that relational identity integrates person- and role-based identities and thereby the individual, interpersonal, and collective levels of self; contrast relational identity and relational identification with social identity and social identification; contend that relational identity and relational identification are each arranged in a cognitive hierarchy ranging from generalized to particularized schemas; and contrast relational identification with relational disidentification and ambivalent relational identification.
    Subject(s): Ambivalence ; Analysis ; Business management ; Business organization ; Business studies ; Firm theory ; Gender identity ; Group identity ; Identification ; Identity ; Identity theory ; Interpersonal relations ; Motivation ; Organization theory ; Organizational behavior ; Professional relationships ; Self ; Social identity ; Social interaction ; Social psychology ; Studies ; Work experience ; Work place
    ISSN: 0363-7425
    E-ISSN: 1930-3807
    Source: International Bibliography of the Social Sciences (IBSS)
    Source: Business Source Ultimate
    Source: JSTOR Arts & Sciences IV
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 8
    Language: English
    In: Organization science (Providence, R.I.), 2011-10, Vol.22 (5), p.1144-1156
    Description: Most research on organization-based identities focuses on a single level of analysis, typically the individual, group, or organization. As a spur to more cross-level identity research, we offer speculative discussions on two issues concerning nested identities. First, regarding the processes through which identities become linked across levels, we explore how identities at one level of analysis enable and constrain identities at other levels. We argue that, for a collective identity, intrasubjective understanding ("I think") fosters intersubjective understanding ("we think") through interaction, which in turn fosters generic understanding-a sense of the collective that transcends individuals ("it is"). Second, regarding the content of linked identities, we suggest that identities are relatively isomorphic across levels because organizational goals require some internal coherence. However, for various intended and unintended reasons, isomorphism is often impeded across levels, and identities tend to become somewhat differentiated.
    Subject(s): Analysis ; Associations, institutions, etc ; Corporate identity ; cross-level ; Cultural identity ; Evaluation ; Group dynamics ; Group identity ; Identity ; Identity theory ; Images ; Meta-analysis ; multilevel ; Occupational identity ; Occupational roles ; Organizational analysis ; Organizational behavior ; Organizational behaviour ; Organizational culture ; Organizational identity ; Organizational research ; Self ; Sense making ; sensemaking ; Social identity
    ISSN: 1047-7039
    E-ISSN: 1526-5455
    Source: International Bibliography of the Social Sciences (IBSS)
    Source: Business Source Ultimate
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 9
    Language: English
    In: Journal of management, 2017-05, Vol.43 (5), p.1578-1608
    Description: Research suggests that organizational members highly prize respect but rarely report adequately receiving it. However, there is a lack of theory in organizational behavior regarding what respect actually is and why members prize it. We argue that there are two distinct types of respect: generalized respect is the sense that “we” are all valued in this organization, and particularized respect is the sense that the organization values “me” for particular attributes, behaviors, and achievements. We build a theoretical model of respect, positing antecedents of generalized respect from the sender’s perspective (prestige of social category, climate for generalized respect) and proposed criteria for the evaluation of particularized respect (role, organizational member, and character prototypicality), which is then enacted by the sender and perceived by the receiver. We also articulate how these two types of respect fulfill the receiver’s needs for belonging and status, which facilitates the self-related outcomes of organization-based self-esteem, organizational and role identification, and psychological safety. Finally, we consider generalized and personalized respect jointly and present four combinations of the two types of respect. We argue that the discrepancy between organizational members’ desired and received respect is partially attributable to the challenge of simultaneously enacting or receiving respect for both the “we” and the “me.”
    Subject(s): Behavioural aspects ; Belongingness ; Group dynamics ; Individualized ; Models ; Organizational behavior ; Organizational research ; Prestige ; Respect ; Safety ; Self esteem
    ISSN: 0149-2063
    E-ISSN: 1557-1211
    Source: International Bibliography of the Social Sciences (IBSS)
    Source: Business Source Ultimate
    Source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 10
    Language: English
    In: Journal of management, 2008-06, Vol.34 (3), p.325-374
    Description: The literature on identification in organizations is surprisingly diverse and large. This article reviews the literature in terms of four fundamental questions. First, under “What is identification?,” it outlines a continuum from narrow to broad formulations and differentiates situated identification from deep identification and organizational identification from organizational commitment. Second, in answer to “Why does identification matter?,” it discusses individual and organizational outcomes as well as several links to mainstream organizational behavior topics. Third, regarding “How does identification occur?,” it describes a process model that involves cycles of sensebreaking and sensegiving, enacting identity and sensemaking, and constructing identity narratives. Finally, under “One or many?,” it discusses team, workgroup, and subunit; relational; occupational and career identifications; and how multiple identifications may conflict, converge, and combine.
    Subject(s): Commitment (Psychology) ; Commitments ; Identity ; Models ; Organizational behavior ; Organizational research ; Social identity ; Studies
    ISSN: 0149-2063
    E-ISSN: 1557-1211
    Source: International Bibliography of the Social Sciences (IBSS)
    Source: Business Source Ultimate
    Source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. More information can be found here...