placeholder
and
and

Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Proceed order?

Export
Filter
Document type
Language
Year
  • 1
    Language: English
    In: Epilepsia, May 2011, Vol.52(5), pp.993-9
    Description: Generalized epilepsies are clinically and genetically heterogeneous syndromes. Idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE), which has a strong genetic background, is not associated with any additional clinical features, such as mental retardation (MR). Herein we report results of linkage analysis in a large family with autosomal dominant (AD) generalized epilepsy associated with MR. We identified a four-generation kindred with several affected members with generalized epilepsy without any evidence for secondary causes. Electroencephalography (EEG) studies and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) results were reviewed when available. We performed a genome-wide linkage analysis. Fourteen individuals were classified as affected and an additional three were considered as nonpenetrant obligatory carriers. Thirteen affected individual had a history of generalized tonic-clonic seizures, and absence seizures were reported in nine affected individuals. There was no history of preceding febrile seizures. MR was present in nine affected individuals with epilepsy but the other affected individuals had normal intelligence. Neuroimaging did not reveal any structural abnormalities and EEG studies were consistent with IGE rather than symptomatic generalized epilepsy. Genetic analysis detected a group of markers with logarithmic (base 10) of odds (LOD) score 〉3 on chromosome 3p spanning a 5.5 Mbp region. Sequencing of several candidate genes, including dynein light chain-A, golgin subfamily a4, leucine rich repeat (in FLII) interacting gene, serine/threonine-protein kinase DCAMKL3 (doublecortin- like and CAM kinase-like 3), laforin (EPM2A) interacting protein 1 (EPM2AIP1, programmed... We report the identification of a genetic locus for generalized epilepsy associated with MR on chromosome 3p. Affected individuals have a form of genetic epilepsy with generalized seizures variably associated with MR. Despite the presence of MR in several affected patients, epilepsy phenotype was not fully consistent with symptomatic epilepsy and suggests a biologic continuum between symptomatic epilepsies and IGE.
    Subject(s): Chromosomes, Human, Pair 3 -- Genetics ; Epilepsy, Generalized -- Genetics ; Genetic Linkage -- Genetics ; Intellectual Disability -- Genetics
    ISSN: 0013-9580
    E-ISSN: 1528-1167
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    In: Neurology, 2016, Vol.87(16), pp.1636-1637
    Subject(s): Anesthetics–Economics ; Anticonvulsants–Therapeutic Use ; Humans–Economics ; Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care)–Therapeutic Use ; Status Epilepticus–Economics ; Status Epilepticus–Standards ; Status Epilepticus–Drug Therapy ; Status Epilepticus–Economics ; Abridged ; Anesthetics ; Anticonvulsants;
    ISSN: 0028-3878
    E-ISSN: 1526632X
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 3
    Article
    Article
    2010
    ISSN: 0013-9580 
    In: Epilepsia, February 2010, Vol.51, pp.40-42
    Subject(s): Medicine;
    ISSN: 0013-9580
    E-ISSN: 1528-1167
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 4
    In: Epilepsia, November 2015, Vol.56(11), pp.1819-1827
    Description: To purchase or authenticate to the full-text of this article, please visit this link: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/epi.13186/abstract Byline: Victoria L. Morgan, Baxter P. Rogers, Bassel Abou-Khalil Keywords: Functional neuroimaging; fMRI ; Temporal lobe epilepsy; Thalamus Abstract Objective Temporal lobe epilepsy is associated with functional changes throughout the brain, particularly including a putative seizure propagation network involving the hippocampus, insula, and thalamus. We identified a specified frequency range where functional connectivity in this network was related to duration of disease. Then, to identify specific thalamic nuclei involved in seizure propagation, we determined the subregions of the thalamus that have increased resting functional oscillations in this frequency range. Methods Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was acquired from 20 patients with unilateral temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE; 14 right and 6 left) and 20 healthy controls who were each age and gender matched to a specific patient. Wavelet-based fMRI connectivity mapping across the network was computed at each frequency to determine those frequencies where connectivity significantly decreases with duration of disease consistent with impairment due to repeated seizures. The voxel-wise power of the spontaneous blood oxygenation fluctuations of this frequency band was computed in the thalamus of each subject. Results Functional connectivity was impaired in the proposed seizure propagation network over a specific range (0.0067-0.013 Hz and 0.024-0.032 Hz) of blood oxygenation oscillations. Increased power in this frequency band (〈0.032 Hz) was detected bilaterally in the pulvinar and anterior nucleus of the thalamus of healthy controls, and was increased over the ipsilateral thalamus compared to the contralateral thalamus in TLE. Significance This study identified frequencies of impaired connectivity in a TLE seizure propagation network and used them to localize the anterior nucleus and pulvinar of the thalamus as subregions most susceptible to TLE seizures. Further examinations of these frequencies in healthy and TLE subjects may provide unique information relating to the mechanism of seizure propagation and potential treatment using electrical stimulation.
    Subject(s): Functional Neuroimaging ; Fmri ; Temporal Lobe Epilepsy ; Thalamus
    ISSN: 0013-9580
    E-ISSN: 1528-1167
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 5
    In: Epilepsia, September 2012, Vol.53(9), pp.1628-1635
    Description: Early surgical intervention can be advantageous in the treatment of refractory temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). The success of TLE surgery relies on accurate lateralization of the seizure onset. The purpose of this study was to determine whether resting functional MRI (fMRI) connectivity mapping of the hippocampus has the potential to complement conventional presurgical evaluations in distinguishing left from right TLE. In addition, we sought to determine whether this same network might separate patients with favorable from unfavorable postoperative outcomes. Resting fMRI acquisitions were performed on 21 patients with TLE and 15 healthy controls. The patients included seven patients with left TLE and seven patients with right TLE with seizure‐free postoperative outcome, and five patients with left TLE and two patients with right TLE with recurring seizures after surgery. Functional connectivity maps to each hippocampus were determined for each subject and were compared between the controls and the seizure‐free patients with left TLE and with right TLE. The one network identified was then quantified in the patients with TLE and recurring seizures. The resting functional connectivity between the right hippocampus and the ventral lateral nucleus of the right thalamus was the most statistically significant network to distinguish between seizure‐free patients with left TLE and with right TLE with high sensitivity and specificity. This connectivity was also significantly greater in the seizure‐free patients with left TLE than the healthy controls. Finally, six of the seven patients in whom seizures recurred after surgery had connectivity values in this network unlike those who were seizure‐free. This study identified a region in the ventral lateral nucleus of the right thalamus whose connectivity to the hippocampi separates left from right TLE subjects. This suggests that the quantification of resting‐state functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) connectivity across this network may be a potential indicator of lateralization of TLE that may be added to other presurgical MRI assessments. Further validation in a larger, independent cohort is required.
    Subject(s): Temporal Lobe Epilepsy ; Brain ; Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging ; Connectivity ; Hippocampus ; Thalamus
    ISSN: 0013-9580
    E-ISSN: 1528-1167
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 6
    Article
    Article
    2017
    ISSN: 1172-7047 
    Language: English
    In: CNS Drugs, 2017, Vol.31(10), pp.835-844
    Description: Monotherapy remains the standard initial therapy of epilepsy, but when the first antiepileptic drug (AED) fails, combination therapy may be considered. The choice of combination therapy should take into consideration pharmacokinetic interactions, as well as pharmacodynamic interactions related to mechanism of action. There is evidence that an AED combination with different mechanisms of action is more likely to be successful than a combination with the same mechanisms. The combination of lamotrigine and valproate has been demonstrated to be synergistic in its efficacy. However, there are limited data to support other synergistic AED combinations.
    Subject(s): Anticonvulsants -- Therapeutic Use ; Epilepsy -- Drug Therapy;
    ISSN: 1172-7047
    E-ISSN: 1179-1934
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 7
    In: Epilepsia, September 2011, Vol.52(9), pp.1741-1749
    Description: Mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE) is a chronic disorder with spontaneous seizures recurring for years, or even decades. Many structural and functional changes have been detected in both the seizure focus and distal regions throughout the brain over this duration that may reflect the development of epileptogenic networks. Resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) connectivity mapping has the potential to elucidate and quantify these networks. The network between the left and right hippocampus may very likely be one of the most susceptible to changes due to long‐term seizure propagation effects. Therefore, the objective of this study was to quantify cross hippocampal influence in mTLE using high temporal resolution fMRI, and to determine its relationship with disease duration. fMRI images were acquired in the resting (interictal) state with 500 ms temporal resolution across the temporal lobes of 19 mTLE patients (13 left, 6 right). The left and right hippocampi were identified on each subject’s images using both structurally defined and functionally defined boundaries. The cross hippocampal influence was quantified in two ways for each pair of regions: (1) the nondirectional hippocampal functional connectivity calculated as the Pearson’s correlation between the average time series in the left and the right hippocampus regions, and (2) the Granger causality (GC) laterality measure, which implies directional influence by determining temporal precedence. Each of these measures was correlated with age, age of onset, and disease duration across subjects to investigate relationship to disease progression. The hippocampal connectivity was not significantly different between patients with left and right mTLE using either the structurally or the functionally defined regions. Across all patients, hippocampal connectivity was not correlated significantly with age of onset or duration of disease. However, as duration of disease increased after 10 years (nine patients), the hippocampal connectivity increased linearly. Using the functionally defined regions, the GC laterality was increased in the right mTLE over the left mTLE, indicating that the left hippocampus was influencing the right hippocampus more than the right influencing left. This was also positively correlated with age of onset. Furthermore, like hippocampal connectivity, the relationship between GC laterality and duration of disease changes after 10 years duration of disease. After this duration, the GC laterality was positive in the three of three patients with right mTLE (left influencing right), whereas the GC laterality was negative in five of six patients with left mTLE (right influencing left). This study reveals a relationship between fMRI functional connectivity and causal influence of the left and right hippocampi and duration of disease in mTLE. During the interictal state, the interhemispheric hippocampal connectivity initially is disrupted and then linearly increases as the epilepsy progresses longer than 10 years. This increase in connectivity appears to be due to the hippocampus contralateral to the epileptogenic focus exerting more influence over the ipsilateral hippocampus. These findings may have implications in understanding the functional development of epileptic networks and possibly prediction of surgical outcome of mTLE.
    Subject(s): Temporal Lobe Epilepsy ; Brain ; Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging ; Connectivity ; Hippocampus
    ISSN: 0013-9580
    E-ISSN: 1528-1167
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 8
    In: Epilepsia, January 2014, Vol.55(1), pp.57-66
    Description: Brivaracetam (BRV) is a novel high-affinity synaptic vesicle protein 2A ligand currently being investigated for the treatment of epilepsy. The purpose of this phase III study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety/tolerability of adjunctive BRV in adults with uncontrolled partial-onset (focal) seizures. This was a prospective, multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group, fixed-dose trial (N01253; NCT00464269). Adults aged 16-70 years with well-characterized partial epilepsy not fully controlled despite treatment with one or two antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) were enrolled. Patients who experienced eight or more partial-onset seizures, whether or not secondarily generalized, during the 8-week prospective baseline period were randomized (1:1:1:1) to receive twice-daily placebo (PBO) or BRV (5, 20, or 50 mg/day) without titration. The primary efficacy endpoint was percent reduction over PBO in baseline-adjusted partial-onset seizure frequency/week during the 12-week treatment period. Comparison of BRV with PBO was sequential (50, 20 mg/day, then 5 mg/day). Secondary endpoints included greater than or equal to 50% responder rate and median percent reduction from baseline in partial-onset seizure frequency/week. Post hoc analyses included the primary efficacy endpoint evaluated over 28 days and exploratory subanalyses of efficacy by seizure subtype. Safety and tolerability assessments included treatment-emergent adverse events (TEAEs), laboratory tests, electrocardiography, vital signs, and physical and neurologic examinations. Of 400 patients randomized, 396 were included in the intent-to-treat (ITT) population (PBO n = 98, BRV 5 mg/day n = 97, BRV 20 mg/day n = 100, BRV 50 mg/day n = 101) and 392 comprised the modified ITT (mITT) population. A total of 361 (91.2%) of 396 patients completed the study. Most patients (78.3%) were receiving two concomitant AEDs. Percent reduction in partial-onset seizure frequency/week over PBO was -0.9% (p = 0.885) for BRV 5 mg/day, 4.1% (p = 0.492) for BRV 20 mg/day, and 12.8% (p = 0.025) for BRV 50 mg/day (mITT population). Statistical significance was also achieved for the percent reduction over PBO in baseline-adjusted partial-onset seizure frequency/28 days for BRV 50 mg/day (22.0%; p = 0.004) but not for the other BRV dose groups. In the BRV 50 mg/day group, statistical significance was also seen for the greater than or equal to 50% responder rate (BRV 32.7% vs. PBO 16.7%; p = 0.008) and median percent reduction from baseline in partial-onset seizure frequency/week (BRV 30.5% vs. PBO 17.8%; p = 0.003). In the exploratory subanalysis by seizure subtype, median percent reduction from baseline in seizure frequency/week and greater than or equal to 50% responder rate were numerically greater than PBO in the BRV 20 and 50 mg/day groups for simple partial, complex partial, and secondarily generalized seizures. BRV was generally well tolerated, with the majority of TEAEs being mild-to-moderate in intensity. Of the TEAEs reported by greater than or equal to 5% patients, those with a frequency 〉3% higher than PBO for any dose of BRV compared with PBO were somnolence, dizziness, fatigue, influenza, insomnia, nasopharyngitis, vomiting, diarrhea, urinary tract infection, and nausea. Adjunctive BRV at a daily dose of 50 mg was associated with statistically significant reductions in seizure frequency compared with PBO. All doses of BRV showed good tolerability throughout the study.
    Subject(s): Brivaracetam ; Partial Epilepsy ; Phase Iii ; Efficacy ; Safety/Tolerability
    ISSN: 0013-9580
    E-ISSN: 1528-1167
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 9
    Language: English
    In: Epilepsy currents, January 2012, Vol.12(1), pp.29-31
    Subject(s): Medicine
    ISSN: 1535-7597
    E-ISSN: 1535-7511
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 10
    Language: English
    In: Epilepsy currents, March 2012, Vol.12(2), pp.59-60
    Subject(s): Medicine
    ISSN: 1535-7597
    E-ISSN: 1535-7511
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. More information can be found here...